The Making of the 21st Century

Uploaded on Nov 14, 2010 Documentary on the making of Thunderbirds & all the other worlds of Gerry Anderson. Featuring interviews with Gerry Anderson, Ed Bishop, Francis Matthews, Christine Glanville & Derek Meddings. Edited by myself back in 1992 to … Continue reading

Uploaded on Nov 14, 2010
Documentary on the making of Thunderbirds & all the other worlds of Gerry Anderson. Featuring interviews with Gerry Anderson, Ed Bishop, Francis Matthews, Christine Glanville & Derek Meddings. Edited by myself back in 1992 to a radio documentary from the 1980′s. I made it in between my college course in TV/Video Production. Edited on VHS.

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Stingray – Feature Presentation

Uploaded on Oct 15, 2011 Fan edit which makes use of the unused linking materials shot for the feature presentation of the Pilot, An Echo of Danger, Raptures of the Deep & Emergency Marineville. As the whole film had never … Continue reading

Uploaded on Oct 15, 2011
Fan edit which makes use of the unused linking materials shot for the feature presentation of the Pilot, An Echo of Danger, Raptures of the Deep & Emergency Marineville. As the whole film had never been assembled, I wanted to do my own version, as well as making some custom titles for it.

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UFO

UFO is a 1970 British science fiction television series about a secret military organization which defends the Earth from Alien invaders. The series was created by Gerry & Sylvia Anderson, who previously created the “Supermarionation” puppet TV series in the … Continue reading





UFO is a 1970 British science fiction television series about a secret military organization which defends the Earth from Alien invaders. The series was created by Gerry & Sylvia Anderson, who previously created the “Supermarionation” puppet TV series in the 1960′s (THUNDERBIRDS, FIREBALL XL-5, etc.), and would later create SPACE: 1999. UFO was filmed in 1969-70, and began broadcasting in September 1970 in England and September 1972 in America. The series ran for only a single season, for a total of 26 one-hour color episodes.

Thunderbirds

Thunderbirds is a British science fiction television series first broadcast during 1965 and 1966 which was devised by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson and made by their company, AP Films, using a form of marionette puppetry dubbed “Supermarionation“. The series followed the adventures of International Rescue, a secretive organisation created … Continue reading

Thunderbirds is a British science fiction television series first broadcast during 1965 and 1966 which was devised by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson and made by their company, AP Films, using a form of marionette puppetry dubbed “Supermarionation“. The series followed the adventures of International Rescue, a secretive organisation created to help those in grave danger using technically advanced equipment and machinery launched from its hiddenTracy Island base. The series focused on the head of the organisation, ex-astronaut Jeff Tracy, and his five sons who piloted the “Thunderbird” crafts. Its London agent, Lady Penelope, also makes frequent appearances. The series has benefited from periodic revivals since – as well as subsequently inspiring other television programmes and advertisements, theatrical productions, feature films and substantial merchandise.


Deborah Haile
September 16, 2008

TALES of their daring rescue missions have captivated generations of youngsters, but now a leading academic is seeing if Thunderbirds holds up to scientific scrutiny.

Dr Phillip Atcliffe, from Salford University, has been analysing the iconic space vehicles from the 1970s show to see if their designs could have worked in the real world.

The aerospace engineer has assessed the vehicles for practicality and space and airworthiness.

And he’s done it all in the hope that his work will help to encourage others to share his interest in science and technology.

“It’s all about having fun with engineering for me,” said Dr Atcliffe, who is based in the university’s school of computing, science and engineering.

“I grew up with these TV series and I know they helped many people take an interest, and even go on to work, in engineering and science.

“What I’m doing is taking that to the next level and providing a way in which ordinary people can gain an understanding of how aircraft and spaceships work.

“While some of the features of the machines on TV or in films are dreadful from an engineering standpoint, others are very far-sighted – often in the same craft.”

Dr Atcliffe allows fans of series like Thunderbirds, Stingray and Star Trek to post him scientific questions on e-forums.

He has spoken at schools and science fiction conventions. And he has even helped with official Thunderbirds books and artwork.

Of the five Thunderbirds vehicles he has considered, he says there is one that appears to strike a particular chord with viewers.

“The most common question I get asked is would Thunderbird 2 actually fly?” he said.

Anything can fly

“The answer is yes, because anything can fly. The question is would it fly well? Could it really do its job? And what is that job anyway? That’s when it gets interesting.”

According to Dr Atcliffe, Thunderbird 2 would use body lift to keep itself up at high speeds. He believes it could be improved with better streamlining to prevent temperature problems and suggests the wings are actually of dubious value.

However he admits that when it comes to the design of science-fiction vehicles, there may be other factors – as well as the science – that are important.

“There’s a lot of history in these vehicles – fashions and influences from the times and the state of the art in design and engineering when they were created – and yet they manage to look remarkably futuristic, even 40 years later,” said Dr Atcliffe.

“But overall, it’s important to remember what a member of one forum said were the three key things about designing a vehicle for TV – it must look cool, look a bit like it might work, and look very cool.”

Dr Atcliffe’s verdict on the various machines:

Thunderbird 1: The ultimate aerial hot-rod. Nothing can go much faster and stay in the atmosphere – assuming it doesn`t melt itself. The model is rather too short and stubby for what it’s supposed to do, and has too many lumps and bumps. I’m also not sure it really needs those wings.

Thunderbird 2: The Big Green Beast. Will use body lift to keep itself up at high speeds, so again those little wings are of dubious value. Could do with some better streamlining, lest it too have temperature problems. Not very aerodynamic once it’s dropped the pod.

Thunderbird 3: It’s a rocket, and a kind of visual pun on the number 3. Will have problems if an engine is damaged. Not much else to say, though I’m still trying to work out what it uses for roll control.

Thunderbird 4: The Floating Ford Capri van. Not very streamlined. Keep it underwater because it’ll be instant seasickness on the surface. Could also do with more visible means of control.

Thunderbird 5: Big space station with loads of communications gear. Probably need a couple of others, presumably unmanned, to listen to the entire world. Would appear to have artificial gravity, which none of the others do, so the generator must be quite big and bulky.