tlàtòquê

Tlatoani (Classical Nahuatl: tlàto?ni pronounced [t?a?to?a?ni]; plural tlàtòquê, [t?a?.?to?.ke?]) is the Nahuatl term for the ruler of an altepetl, a pre-Hispanic state. The word literally means “speaker”, but may be translated into English as “king“.[1] A cihu?tlàto?ni ([si.wa?.t?a?.to.?a?.ni]) is a female … Continue reading

Tlatoani (Classical Nahuatl: tlàto?ni pronounced [t?a?to?a?ni]; plural tlàtòquê, [t?a?.?to?.ke?]) is the Nahuatl term for the ruler of an altepetl, a pre-Hispanic state. The word literally means “speaker”, but may be translated into English as “king“.[1] A cihu?tlàto?ni ([si.wa?.t?a?.to.?a?.ni]) is a female ruler, or queen regnant.[2]

The term quauhtlatoani refers to “provisional, interim, or at least non-dynastic rulers”.[3] The leaders of the Mexica prior to their settlement are sometimes referred to as quauhtlatoque, as are those colonial rulers who were not descended from the ruling dynasty.