the future

What the Marshmallow Test Really Teaches About Self-Control JACOBA URIST SEP 24, 2014 One of the most influential modern psychologists, Walter Mischel, addresses misconceptions about his study, and discusses how both adults and kids can master willpower. Published on Dec 14, 2012 Silvia Helena Barcellos is an Associate Economist at RAND Corporation, Santa Monica Office. […]

What the Marshmallow Test Really Teaches About Self-Control

One of the most influential modern psychologists, Walter Mischel, addresses misconceptions about his study, and discusses how both adults and kids can master willpower.

Published on Dec 14, 2012
Silvia Helena Barcellos is an Associate Economist at RAND Corporation, Santa Monica Office. Her research focuses on applied microeconomics topics in labor and development economics. Her labor economics research includes works on the economic causes and consequences of immigration to the United States and on the effects of taxation on location and organizational choices of firms and individuals. In research on development economics, Barcellos has investigated the existence of gender discrimination in parental time investments in India.

The Stanford marshmallow experiment[1] was a series of studies on delayed gratification in the late 1960s and early 1970s led by psychologist Walter Mischel, then a professor at Stanford University. In these studies, a child was offered a choice between one small reward provided immediately or two small rewards (i.e., a larger later reward) if they waited for a short period, approximately 15 minutes, during which the tester left the room and then returned. (The reward was sometimes a marshmallow, but often a cookie or apretzel.) In follow-up studies, the researchers found that children who were able to wait longer for the preferred rewards tended to have better life outcomes, as measured by SAT scores,[2] educational attainment,[3] body mass index (BMI),[4] and other life measures.[5]

The experiment has its roots in an earlier one performed in Trinidad, where Mischel noticed that the different ethnic groups living on the island had contrasting stereotypes about one another, specifically the other’s perceived recklessness, self-control, and ability to have fun.[6] This small (n= 53) study focused on male and female children aged 7 to 9 (35Black and 18 East Indian) in a rural Trinidad school. The children were required to indicate a choice between receiving a 1¢ candy immediately, or having a (preferable) 10¢ candy given to them in one week’s time. Mischel reported a significant ethnic difference, with Indian children showing far more ability to delay gratification as compared to African students, as well as large age differences, and that “Comparison of the ‘high’ versus ‘low’ socioeconomic groups on the experimental choice did not yield a significant difference”.[6] Absence of the father was prevalent in the African-descent group (occurring only once in the East Indian group), and this variable showed the strongest link to delay of gratification, with children from intact families showing superior ability to delay.

Affective neuroscience

Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over December 30, 20134:04 PM ET MICHAELEEN DOUCLEF Affect is the experience of feeling or emotion.[1] Affect is a key part of the process of an organism‘s interaction with stimuli. The word also refers sometimes to affect display, which is “a facial, vocal, or gestural […]

People drew maps of body locations where they feel basic emotions (top row) and more complex ones (bottom row). Hot colors show regions that people say are stimulated during the emotion. Cool colors indicate deactivated areas. Image courtesy of Lauri Nummenmaa, Enrico Glerean, Riitta Hari, and Jari Hietanen.

People drew maps of body locations where they feel basic emotions (top row) and more complex ones (bottom row). Hot colors show regions that people say are stimulated during the emotion. Cool colors indicate deactivated areas.
Image courtesy of Lauri Nummenmaa, Enrico Glerean, Riitta Hari, and Jari Hietanen.

Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

December 30, 20134:04 PM ET
MICHAELEEN DOUCLEF

Affect is the experience of feeling or emotion.[1] Affect is a key part of the process of an organism‘s interaction with stimuli. The word also refers sometimes to affect display, which is “a facial, vocal, or gestural behavior that serves as an indicator of affect” (APA 2006).

The affective domain represents one of the three divisions described in modern psychology: the cognitive, the conative, and the affective. Classically, these divisions have also been referred to as the “ABC of psychology”, in that case using the terms “affect”, “behavior“, and “cognition”. In certain views, the cognitive may be considered as a part of the affective, or the affective as a part of the cognitive.[2]

Affective states are psycho-physiological constructs. According to most current views, they vary along three principal dimensions: valence, arousal, and motivational intensity.[3]Valence is the subjective positive-to-negative evaluation of an experienced state. Emotional valence refers to the emotion’s consequences, emotion-eliciting circumstances, or subjective feelings or attitudes.[4] Arousal is objectively measurable as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but can also be assessed subjectively via self-report. Arousal is a construct that is closely related to motivational intensity but they differ in that motivation necessarily implies action while arousal does not.[5] Motivational intensity refers to the impulsion to act.[6] It is the strength of an urge to move toward or away from a stimulus. Simply moving is not considered approach motivation without a motivational urge present.[7]

All three of these categories can be related to cognition when considering the construct of cognitive scope. Initially, it was thought that positive affects broadened cognitive scope whereas negative affects narrowed cognitive scope.[3] However, evidence now suggests that affects high in motivational intensity narrow cognitive scope whereas affects low in motivational intensity broaden cognitive scope. The cognitive scope has indeed proven to be a valuable construct in cognitive psychology.[3]

Affective neuroscience is the study of the neural mechanisms of emotion. This interdisciplinary field combines neuroscience with the psychological study of personality, emotion, and mood.

Emotions are thought to be related to activity in brain areas that direct our attention, motivate our behavior, and determine the significance of what is going on around us. Pioneering work by Paul Broca (1878),[2] James Papez (1937),[3] and Paul D. MacLean (1952)[4] suggested that emotion is related to a group of structures in the center of the brain called the limbic system, which includes the hypothalamus, cingulate cortex, hippocampi, and other structures. Research has shown that limbic structures are directly related to emotion, but non-limbic structures have been found to be of greater emotional relevance. The following brain structures are currently thought to be involved in emotion:[5]

In its broadest sense, cognition refers to all mental processes. However, the study of cognition has historically excluded emotion and focused on non-emotional processes (e.g., memory, attention, perception, action, problem solving and mental imagery).[40] As a result, the study of the neural basis of non-emotional and emotional processes emerged as two separate fields: cognitive neuroscience and affective neuroscience. The distinction between non-emotional and emotional processes is now thought to be largely artificial, as the two types of processes often involve overlapping neural and mental mechanisms.[41] Thus, when cognition is taken at its broadest definition, affective neuroscience could also be called the cognitive neuroscience of emotion.

Main structures of the limbic system

  • Amygdala — The amygdalae are two small, round structures located anterior to the hippocampi near the temporal poles. The amygdalae are involved in detecting and learning what parts of our surroundings are important and have emotional significance. They are critical for the production of emotion, and may be particularly so for negative emotions, especially fear.[6] Multiple studies have shown amygdala activation when perceiving a potential threat; various circuits allow the amygdala to use related past memories to better judge the possible threat.[7]
  • Thalamus– The thalamus is involved in relaying sensory and motor signals to the cerebral cortex,[8] especially visual stimuli. The thalamus also plays an important role in regulating states of sleep and wakefulness.[9]
  • Hypothalamus– The hypothalamus is located below the thalamus. It plays a role in emotional responses by synthesizing and releasing neurotransmitters which can affect mood, reward and arousal.[10]
  • Hippocampus – The hippocampus is a structure of the medial temporal lobes that is mainly involved in memory. It works to form new memories and also connecting different senses such as visual input, smell or sound to memories. The hippocampus allows memories to be stored long term and also retrieves them when necessary. It is this retrieval that is used within the amygdala to help evaluate current affective stimulus.[11]
  • Fornix The fornix is the main output pathway from the hippocampus to the mammillary bodies. It has been identified as a main region in controlling spatial memory functions, episodic memory and executive functions.[12]
  • Mammillary body – Mammillary bodies are important for recollective memory.[13]
  • Olfactory bulb– The olfactory bulbs are the first cranial nerves, located on the ventral side of the frontal lobe. They are involved in olfaction, the perception of odors.[14]
  • Cingulate gyrus– The cingulate gyrus is located above the corpus callosum and is usually considered to be part of the limbic system. The different parts of the cingulate gyrus have different functions, and are involved with affect, visceromotor control, response selection, skeletomotor control, visuospatial processing, and in memory access.[15] A part of the cingulate gyrus is the anterior cingulate cortex, that is thought to play a central role in attention[16] and behaviorally demanding cognitive tasks.[17] It may be particularly important with regard to conscious, subjective emotional awareness. This region of the brain may also play an important role in the initiation of motivated behavior.[17]

Other brain structures related to emotion

  • Basal ganglia – Basal ganglia are groups of neuclei found on either side of the thalamus. Basal ganglia play an important role in motivation.[18]
  • Orbitofrontal cortex – Is a major structure involved in decision making and the influence by emotion on that decision.[19]
  • Prefrontal cortex — The term prefrontal cortex refers to the very front of the brain, behind the forehead and above the eyes. It appears to play a critical role in the regulation of emotion and behavior by anticipating the consequences of our actions. The prefrontal cortex may play an important role in delayed gratification by maintaining emotions over time and organizing behavior toward specific goals.[20]
  • Ventral striatum — The ventral striatum is a group of subcortical structures thought to play an important role in emotion and behavior. One part of the ventral striatum called the nucleus accumbens is thought to be involved in the experience of goal-directed positive emotion. Individuals with addictions experience increased activity in this area when they encounter the object of their addiction.
  • Insula — The insular cortex is thought to play a critical role in the bodily experience of emotion, as it is connected to other brain structures that regulate the body’s autonomic functions (heart rate, breathing, digestion, etc.). This region also processes taste information and is thought to play an important role in experiencing the emotion of disgust.
  • Cerebellum – Recently, there has been a considerable amount of work that describes the role of the cerebellum in emotion as well as cognition, and a “Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome” has been described.[21] Both neuroimaging studies as well as studies following pathological lesions in the cerebellum (such as a stroke) demonstrate that the cerebellum has a significant role in emotional regulation. Lesion studies[22] have shown that cerebellar dysfunction can attenuate the experience of positive emotions. While these same studies do not show an attenuated response to frightening stimuli, the stimuli did not recruit structures that normally would be activated (such as the amygdala). Rather, alternative limbic structures were activated, such as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate gyrus, and the insula. This may indicate that evolutionary pressure resulted in the development of the cerebellum as a redundant fear-mediating circuit to enhance survival. It may also indicate a regulatory role for the cerebellum in the neural response to rewarding stimuli, such as money,[23] drugs of abuse,[24] and orgasm.[25]

 

Memory

Hermann Ebbinghaus (January 24, 1850 – February 26, 1909) was a German psychologist who pioneered the experimental study of memory, and is known for his discovery of the forgetting curve and the spacing effect. He was also the first person to describe thelearning curve.[1] He was the father of the eminent neo-Kantian philosopher Julius Ebbinghaus.

Hermann Ebbinghaus (January 24, 1850 – February 26, 1909) was a German psychologist who pioneered the experimental study of memory, and is known for his discovery of the forgetting curve and the spacing effect. He was also the first person to describe thelearning curve.[1] He was the father of the eminent neo-Kantian philosopher Julius Ebbinghaus.



Merry Xmas

Love among neighbors is not that hard. Yet, In today’s world every human is the neighbor of ech of us and that seems to be beyond our capablity. Humans are social animals and it’s our natural instinct to be emphatic … Continue reading

Love among neighbors is not that hard. Yet, In today’s world every human is the neighbor of ech of us and that seems to be beyond our capablity.

Humans are social animals and it’s our natural instinct to be emphatic with others. It’s natural for us to bond by kinship. Unfortunately the same tribal instinct hampers our ability to recognize the essential and vital global brotherhood of man. We cling to nationality, religion, and many artificial walls we build around us that compromise our chances for long terms survival.

The deal in Paris includes an agreement to limit global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius, with an aim of 1.5 degrees, and achieve climate ‘neutrality’ that will require phasing out fossil fuels soon after mid-century. That 2 degree pledge would require keeping 80% of the world’s remaining fossil fuels underground, a 1.5 degree target even more. Nonetheless, there is a disconnect between the formal pledge and actual commitments, Postponing phasing out fossil fuels til 2050 is in reality refusing to act. We should not blame our leaders but check how we live our lives, driving cars, living in big houses, buying and wasting cheap goods.

Nature does not play political games.

addiction

Bruce K. Alexander (born 20 December 1939)[1] is a psychologist and professor emeritus from Vancouver, BC, Canada.[1] He has taught and conducted research on thepsychology of addiction at Simon Fraser University since 1970.[2] He retired from active teaching in 2005. … Continue reading

Bruce K. Alexander (born 20 December 1939)[1] is a psychologist and professor emeritus from Vancouver, BC, Canada.[1] He has taught and conducted research on thepsychology of addiction at Simon Fraser University since 1970.[2] He retired from active teaching in 2005. Alexander and SFU colleagues conducted a series of experiments into drug addiction known as the Rat Park experiments. He has written two books: Peaceful Measures: Canada’s Way Out of the War on Drugs (1990)[3] and The Globalization of Addiction: A Study in Poverty of the Spirit (2008).


Rat Park

The Rat Park experiments, published in psychopharmacology journals in the late 1970s and early 1980s, flatly contradicted the dominant view of addiction in their day. They quickly disappeared from view, having evoked only negative responses in the mainstream press and journals. Lauren Slater’s controversial psychology book, Opening Skinner’s Box: Great Psychological Experiments of the Twentieth Century[5] helped to bring them back to public attention in 2005. These experiments are now widely known and cited.

The Rat Park experiments were among the first to show the error in the once dominant myth that certain drugs, particularly the opiates, convert all or most users into drug addicts. In the 1970s, this myth was said to be demonstrated by the high consumption of opiates and stimulants of rats isolated in specially modified Skinner Boxes that allowed drug self-administration. Alexander and his colleagues demonstrated experimentally that rats isolated in cages of about the same size as Skinner Boxes consume far more morphine than rats that are socially housed in Rat Park.[6] Subsequent research has confirmed that social housing reduces drug intake in rats[7] and that the dominant myth was wrong both for rats and for human beings.[8] Nonetheless, the myth is still embedded in popular culture.

Addiction as a social problem

Alexander then explored the broader implications of Rat Park experiments for human beings. The main conclusions of his experimental and historical research since 1985 can be summarized as follows:

  1. Drug addiction is only a small corner of the addiction problem. Most serious addictions do not involve either drugs or alcohol[9]
  2. Addiction is more a social problem than an individual problem. When socially integrated societies are fragmented by internal or external forces, addiction of all sorts increases dramatically, becoming almost universal in extremely fragmented societies.[10]
  3. Addiction arises in fragmented societies because people use it as a way of adapting to extreme social dislocation. As a form of adaptation, addiction is neither a disease that can be cured nor a moral error that can be corrected by punishment and education.[11]

Therefore, the current NIDA Model of addiction, which Alexander refers to as the official view, is untenable.[12] Contemporary world society can only overcome mass dislocation (and addiction) by restoring psychosocial integration on a political and social level. This requires major social change.[4]

Alexander’s controversial conclusions have been celebrated by some mainstream sources outside the United States. Alexander received a 2007 Sterling Prize for Controversy in Canada, a 2009 high commendation from the British Medical Association, and an invitation to present at the Royal Society of Arts and Manufactures in London in 2011. Although all mainstream American sources have ignored Alexander’s work, it has acquired considerable recognition in outsider sources.[5]

1995 WHO cocaine research project

One line of research in which Alexander played a key role was actively suppressed by the World Health Assembly. Early in the 1990s the World Health Organization (WHO) organized the largest study on cocaine use ever undertaken. Profiles of cocaine use were gathered from 21 cities located in 19 countries all over the world. Alexander was selected as the principal investigator for the Vancouver site. The WHO announced publication of the results of the global study in a press release in 1995.[13]

However, an American representative in the World Health Assembly effectively banned the publication, apparently because the study seemed to contradict the dominant myth of addictive drugs, as applied to cocaine. Part of the study’s findings were “that occasional cocaine use does not typically lead to severe or even minor physical or social problems.” In the sixth meeting of the B committee the US representative threatened that “If WHO activities relating to drugs failed to reinforce proven drug control approaches, funds for the relevant programs should be curtailed”. This led to the WHO decision to postpone publication. The study has not been published officially but was leaked in 2009 and is available at wikileaks.[1]

Published on Jan 7, 2014
Dr. Gabor Maté talks about the root causes of addiction and how to deal with them. This is taken from the Q&A part of TJ Dawe’s show – “Medicine”.


Jacqueline Novogratz shares stories

Jacqueline Novogratz founded and leads Acumen, a nonprofit that takes a businesslike approach to improving the lives of the poor. In her book “The Blue Sweater” she tells stories from the philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down … Continue reading

Jacqueline Novogratz founded and leads Acumen, a nonprofit that takes a businesslike approach to improving the lives of the poor. In her book “The Blue Sweater” she tells stories from the philanthropy, which emphasizes sustainable bottom-up solutions over traditional top-down aid

power

Published on Aug 14, 2014 Far too many Americans are illiterate in power — what it is, how it operates and why some people have it. As a result, those few who do understand power wield disproportionate influence over everyone … Continue reading

Published on Aug 14, 2014
Far too many Americans are illiterate in power — what it is, how it operates and why some people have it. As a result, those few who do understand power wield disproportionate influence over everyone else. “We need to make civics sexy again,” says civics educator Eric Liu. “As sexy as it was during the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement.”

Common Core Math

Published on Apr 14, 2013 Presented by Joy Pullmann Managing Editor of School Reform News and an Education Research Fellow at The Heartland Institute Uploaded on Nov 7, 2011 Talk title: Why math instruction is unnecessary John is a teacher … Continue reading


Published on Apr 14, 2013
Presented by Joy Pullmann
Managing Editor of School Reform News and an Education Research Fellow at The Heartland Institute

Uploaded on Nov 7, 2011
Talk title: Why math instruction is unnecessary

John is a teacher of math and a homeschooling parent who offers a radical-sounding proposal: that we cease to require math instruction in middle and high school. He came to this point of view over a number of years, as he attempted (and failed) to convince students that the math they were learning was beautiful, useful, or an imperative component of their future prosperity. When he stopped trying to connect math with students and simple tried to connect with the students themselves, he made a profound discovery – kids are suffering from “math anxiety.” If the goal of teaching math is to teach us deductive and inductive reasoning, might games and puzzles be equally effective in developing kids’ reasoning skills – and allow them to fulfill their life missions? “We want to reawaken analytical and critical thinking schools that have been anesthetized by the standard curriculum,” says John.

John Bennett is a math teacher in the San Francisco Bay Area and a home-schooling father of four. An outspoken advocate of education reform, he has presented lectures and workshops throughout California. He uses logic puzzles and strategy games in the classroom (and at home) to supplement the traditional mathematics curriculum. John has written three volumes of Pentagrid Puzzles, a new puzzle form he created to challenge deductive logic and visual-spatial reasoning.

Uploaded on Jan 15, 2007
M.J. McDermott is speaking about the current state of math education, as a private citizen .

The main argument for the new way of teaching Mathematics is that this isn’t the 1950’s and nobody does numerical calculations by hand anymore. Scientists, engineers, economists, etc. all use computer programs to do their calculations. If you spend too much time teaching kids how to calculate, you aren’t teaching them mathematics, yAt the core (not pun intended) of this discussion is a basic misunderstand about what it means to understand. Experts at whatever can never explain how they do what they do. Expert knowledge is in the form of pattern recognition procedures regulated by the basal ganglia and not in the form of explicit coding of rational rules. Yet a rich area of research, what is the best way to teach children math in the era of smartphones?

The Tea Party has found another front to attack the Obama administration: elementary arithmetic. The 32-12 problem is making the rounds. I do not know the source and I do not know anything about the core math curricula. There is no context to understand where this example comes from or even if it is really in some workbook. What is the rule? What is the purpose of the exercise? What level? It is not possible to discuss the merit of the method without the context. In any case the video is misleading as “old fashioned” method shown is shorthand for a complicated procedure with the complexity of “borrowing.”

For example 32-17:

17 = 10 + 7

12-7 = 5

32-12 =20

20- 10 = 10

10+5=15

Whereas the new method seems to be

17+3 = 20;

20+10 = 30;

30+2 = 32;

(3+10+2 = 15)

Arkansas is well down in the bottom half of states in educational achievement. The woman doing the presentation doesn’t even realize what she is presenting. What she’s showing is what they teach so kids understand the PRINCIPLES underlying multiplication and division. The kids will eventually do it the “normal” way. A geometric visual explanation of the meaning of addition and multiplication is misconstrued as a procedure to do the calculations.

I am not qualified to discuss how to teach children but I am a parent myself. The fact that a parent gets emotional or pokes fun at the way their children are taught does not make her opinion valid.


Epistemology

Faith is believing what you know ain’t so Mark Twain The difference between garbage and raw materials is that garbage is a motley mix while raw materials are collated. That is, if one keeps left overs and scrap in separated bins of aluminium cans, paper, organic waste, and so on, then they are no longer […]

Faith is believing what you know ain’t so

Mark Twain

The difference between garbage and raw materials is that garbage is a motley mix while raw materials are collated. That is, if one keeps left overs and scrap in separated bins of aluminium cans, paper, organic waste, and so on, then they are no longer waste but materials available for some useful purpose. However, it is not enough to collate the waste, we must have an use for the different materials or we then just have clutter.

An analogue relation exist between data and information. If data is to be useful information, it must be collated, processed, and delivered to the appropriate decision maker in time and form.

A related concept is knowledge. I cannot articulate with precision what is knowledge but it is related to the ability to act appropriately. The management of knowledge.is a key challenge for organizations. Most of what experts know is not even conscious and cannot be articulated. The experts do not really know how they do what they do. At the brain level most skills are encoded in the basal ganglia and not in the thinking parts of the brain. It is a set of experiences and patterns that are acquired by doing or executing the skill. Individual knowledge becomes for better or worst institutional knowledge trough tradition and apprenticeships.

Published on Jun 3, 2013

UNANSWERED QUESTIONS MEGA-COLLAB:http://youtu.be/UFydagCS9fg

Follow me: http://www.twitter.com/tweetsauce

LINKS/SOURCES:

music by: http://www.youtube.com/user/jakechudnow/

song at end: “Pious Reflection” by Paul Mottram downloaded fromhttp://www.audionetwork.com/
it’s on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kszd5…

Human senses:

http://science.howstuffworks.com/life…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sense

Color illusion: http://loriputnampaints.blogspot.com….

Audio illusion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9VMf…

temperature illusion: http://exs.exploratorium.edu/exhibits…

Tactile illusions: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tactile_…

epistemology wiki pages:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epistomo…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_o…

proof:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proof_(…)
http://thesaurus.com/browse/proof

a priori truth [pdf]: http://consequently.org/papers/aprior…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_priori…)

rotating brain gif: http://lcni.uoregon.edu/~dow/Space_so…

neuroscience of memory:

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/309…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroana…
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/12…
http://www.brainfacts.org/sensing-thi…

LTP:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwp5sf…
http://www.expertsmind.com/topic/neur…

engrams: http://brainsandcognition.wordpress.c…

storage of human brain: http://www.scientificamerican.com/art…

SKYentists: https://twitter.com/nice_mustard/stat…

philosophy of science:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Construc…

The Matrix defense:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/idea…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Matr…

solipsism:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solipsism
http://philosophynow.org/issues/57/Ho…
http://onlinephilosophyclub.com/forum…

Martin Gardner books:

http://bit.ly/19CvvoG
http://amzn.to/Zou74W

why cats like keyboards: http://kotaku.com/5991046/why-cats-lo…

Published on Jul 2, 2013

FOLLOW MICHAEL STEVENS: http://www.Twitter.com/tweetsauce
SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/POIaN7
SOURCES & more creepy stuff below:

John Bergeron’s SINGING ANDROIDS [videos]:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLy-Aw…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zFl_W…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-9v7a…
website: http://www.androidworld.com/prod68.htm

SHAYE ST. John [videos]:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzobV_…
http://www.youtube.com/user/ShayeSain…

“Die in a week” image from MarbleHornets:http://www.youtube.com/user/MarbleHor…

Nightmare-fuel image collections:

http://creepypasta.wikia.com/wiki/Nig…)
http://imgur.com/a/zpxZj?gallery
http://imgur.com/a/fcz3G

dot jpg?? http://i.imgur.com/82taS.jpg

scared of heights? don’t watch this: http://bit.ly/h29PLp

More info about “The Hands Resist Him” painting:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hand…

Creepypasta (unnerving stories):http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creepypasta

aphobia: people who don’t feel fear:http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/b…

sad, terrifying study on learning fear (Little Albert Experiment):http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_A…

scariest things: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear#Com…

fear processing in brain: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_pro…

Stephen King on types of scary stuff:http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/84666…

Claude Levi Strauss on masks and why CLOWNS ARE SCARY:http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/a…

Uncanny Valley:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncanny_…
http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/11/health/…

image metrics video: http://www.awntv.com/videos/image-met…

paper on “creepiness”: http://academia.edu/2465121/Creepiness

famous Cognitive Dissonace study on behavior [with video]:http://www.simplypsychology.org/cogni…

High Place Phenomenon study:http://www.nbcnews.com/health/weird-u…

HPP paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22…

terrible and terrific etymology (it’s called “amelioration”):http://english.stackexchange.com/ques…

Laurie Lipton does GREAT creepy drawings:http://www.laurielipton.com/drawings/

creepy people LITERALLY give you chills:http://www.scientificamerican.com/pod…

creepy things kids say: http://www.uncommon-parenting.com/201…

these are scary: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcas…

creepy subreddits (some may be nsfw):

http://www.reddit.com/r/creepy/
http://www.reddit.com/r/creepygifs
http://www.reddit.com/r/unnerving
http://www.reddit.com/r/FearMe/
http://www.reddit.com/r/scaredshitless
http://www.reddit.com/r/shortscarysto…

what I listened to while researching this episode (playlist):http://bit.ly/13pvoMb

***************

music by
http://www.YouTube.com/JakeChudnow
trip hop and ‘spooky’ music from http://www.audionetwork.com

Published on Dec 9, 2013

Michael Stevens the persona behind the YouTube sensation Vsauce, is an online personality with an entertaining approach to explaining the science behind seemingly ordinary, everyday phenomena. Michael’s videos have been watched over 400 million times and Vsauce’s 4.5 million subscribers continues to add an astonishing 15 thousand subscribers each day. Michael lives in London where he works for Google as an in-house consultant for other creators on the platform.
YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/Vsauce/

http://www.tedxvienna.at/
http://www.facebook.com/tedxvienna

November 2, 2013 at Volkstheater Wien, Vienna, Austria.