a luxury

Dear Friends, Next week the Senate is planning to vote on H.R. 4038, a bill that would slam the door in the face of Iraqi and Syrian refugees who have been victimized by ISIS and Assad.  Please write to your … Continue reading

Dear Friends,

Next week the Senate is planning to vote on H.R. 4038, a bill that would slam the door in the face of Iraqi and Syrian refugees who have been victimized by ISIS and Assad.  Please write to your Members of Congress and tell them that our country should be a place of safety for those fleeing violence.

Fear and cowardice are not the way forward.  ISIS has done terrible things but our reaction to them should not be to punish their victims.  Refugees already face an intense, often multi-year screening process to ensure that they are not a threat.  We should not make it harder for them.  Instead our country should protect victims of torture, abuse, and other forms of violence.  Please write to your Members of Congress today and tell them that you oppose H.R. 4038.

Sincerely,

Matt Hawthorne
Policy Director

P.S. You can also extend a hand of welcome to refugees in your local community.  We encourage you to think of ways you can also help local refugee families – whether by raising money, contributing time or goods, or making clear to your local elected leaders that you believe your community should be a welcoming one.

Uploaded on Nov 15, 2010
Trailer from the multi-award winning documentary Climate Refugees

for documentary filmmaker and immigration expert Sheila Murray, the Syrian refugee crisis is only a prelude.

Her film on international refugee law, No Place to Go, was made for Amnesty International Canada’s refugee program.

In a 2010 report in Refuge magazine, Murray predicted that by 2050, the world could see a mass exodus of 200 million environmental refugees fleeing homelands rendered uninhabitable by extreme weather, rising sea levels, and mega-droughts.

Published on Oct 27, 2015
This drone footage filmed near the Croatian border shows thousands of migrants and refugees crossing through farmland on foot.


People are outraged to see refugees with smartphones. They shouldn’t be.

By: Lloyd Alter

September 8, 2015, 4:16 p.m.

Read more: http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/gadgets-electronics/blogs/people-are-outraged-see-refugees-smartphones-they-shouldnt-be?utm_content=buffer7fb4f&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=planetgreen#ixzz3mW69xuMR

Dalvik VM Internals

Dan Bornstein (Google) Dalvik — the virtual machine with the unusual name — runs your code on Android. Join us to learn about the motivation for its design and get some details about how it works. You’ll also walk away with a few tips for how to write code that works well with the platform. … Continue reading Dalvik VM Internals

Dan Bornstein (Google)

Dalvik — the virtual machine with the unusual name — runs your code on Android. Join us to learn about the motivation for its design and get
some details about how it works. You’ll also walk away with a few tips for how to write code that works well with the platform. Be prepared
for a deep dive into technical details. Questions encouraged!

Presentation Slides
Handouts

SkyAlert

Reconocen a mexicanos creadores de la app de alerta sísmica
by MANUEL SEBREROS on 9-08-2014

Internacional.- Una de las creaciones tecnológicas de mayor éxito en los años recientes en México ha sido la app SkyAlert, la cual funciona como alarma…

Reconocen a mexicanos creadores de la app de alerta sísmica
by MANUEL SEBREROS on 9-08-2014

Internacional.- Una de las creaciones tecnológicas de mayor éxito en los años recientes en México ha sido la app SkyAlert, la cual funciona como alarma sísmica y es de gran funcionalidad para los habitantes de la Ciudad de México, Estado de México, Guerrero, Michoacán y Oaxaca, que son los estados con

robo de un teléfono móvil

Qué hacer ante el robo de un teléfono móvil o una tableta

Con la ayuda de las aplicaciones de seguridad que ofrecen los fabricantes, los usuarios pueden rastrear la ubicación de un dispositivo; los consejos de un especialista de la Policía Metro…

Qué hacer ante el robo de un teléfono móvil o una tableta

Con la ayuda de las aplicaciones de seguridad que ofrecen los fabricantes, los usuarios pueden rastrear la ubicación de un dispositivo; los consejos de un especialista de la Policía Metropolitana sobre cómo actuar en estos casos

Por Guillermo Tomoyose  | LA NACION

Estos servicios no tienen costo y son muy fáciles de usar. Pero si el

titanium backup cloud upload fails

I’m able to backup to Google Drive and Dropbox, but it’s a bit fragile. TB coding for the syncs/backups is really not very robust. The notifications are pretty nondescript and there is no real logging. It seems to me that any glitch in the data transfers cause the syncs to exit, rather than execute any […]

I’m able to backup to Google Drive and Dropbox, but it’s a bit fragile. TB coding for the syncs/backups is really not very robust. The notifications are pretty nondescript and there is no real logging. It seems to me that any glitch in the data transfers cause the syncs to exit, rather than execute any retries.
I’m having some troubles too im on TBP 5.6 and whenever i sync to either drop or drive i get “upload to google drive failed network error”. However i dont need to resume, i can continue. Im not sure if those backups are viable since it was disconnected so many times. The backups work, but the code seems to me to be not very robust. You need to watch your notifications to make sure the backup was successful, and if not, run another one manually.

It’s annoying, and I don’t think it’s going to change.

Google Drive and Dropbox give network errors when trying to upload. I bought Titanium Backup Pro specifically for cloud sync. The first time, it synced about 300 MB to my Google Drive account, but then the backup stopped. Now it doesn’t even sync that much anymore; it just fails – BOTH on Google Drive and on Box. For Google Drive it tells me there was a “Network error”, for Box it tells me: “Internal error com.android.providers.settings.apk.lzop”

Try Foldersync.

Had some issues originally syncing to the cloud where it always failed and it turned out to be Google music related. Specifically I think it was the amount of offline files it couldn’t sync or maybe it was a database, I don’t recall but basically I setup a new job to sync very little and slowly increased it until I figured out what the issue was.

Delete the backup for the apk listed in the error message, then back the app up again. That’s fixed Dropbox sync issues for me on multiple occasions.

Smartphone Secrets

Published on Feb 7, 2013 Source: MINNEAPOLIS (KMSP) – What are you planning to do with the old one before you sell it or toss it in the recycle bin? Read more: Investigators: Smartphone Secrets – KMSP-TVhttp://www.myfoxtwincities.com/story/…

Published on Feb 7, 2013

Source: MINNEAPOLIS (KMSP) – What are you planning to do with the old one before you sell it or toss it in the recycle bin? Read more: Investigators: Smartphone Secrets – KMSP-TVhttp://www.myfoxtwincities.com/story/…

free mobile applications malware

You might want to think twice the next time you download a free app to your smartphone. That app could be riddled with malware able to steal information stored on your phone, according to IEEE Fellow Jeffrey Voas. It pays … Continue reading

You might want to think twice the next time you download a free app to your smartphone. That app could be riddled with malware able to steal information stored on your phone, according to IEEE Fellow Jeffrey Voas. It pays to be extra cautious now, Voas says, because mobile hacking is on the rise, with free apps possibly the most popular tool for gaining access.
Recent research by Voas, a computer scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Md., and his team of researchers found malware in more than 2000 free smartphone apps. The malware can infiltrate your phone’s operating system and cause all kinds of trouble, including stealing personal data.
“Of all the free mobile applications we researched, about 1 in 100 visibly contained malware—and that doesn’t even account for the ones where the malware is so hidden it’s impossible to spot,” Voas says. “The number of malware-contaminated apps is growing by the day, and with most of the apps offering good functionality for free, it’s easy to be victimized.”
Voas used a variety of detection tools—some commercial and others home-grown—which scan an app’s source code and binaries for malware. He and his coresearchers scanned about 280 000 free Android apps. Voas says he was not surprised by what they found. “I expected we would find malware in around 1 percent of the apps.” he says. “But we might have missed a lot because the detection tools we have access to need more work.”
PAY ATTENTION
So what can you do to protect yourself against malware? Unfortunately, very little, Voas says. But he does recommend caution.
First, download free apps only from sources you trust. “The person who wrote your app could wind up acting as your new, unauthorized system administrator of your phone,” he says. He or she can “take total control of your phone, including your GPS location, wireless connection, microphone, camera, and address lists. All your e-mail could be accessible.”
Another way to protect yourself is to pay careful attention to the access rights being requested by an app. When users download apps, they often must agree to give the app access to various features, such as GPS location. That can be helpful—and necessary—for legitimate apps such as Yelp, Google Maps, and other location-based services. But ask yourself if the access being requested makes sense.
“We looked at a variety of ways in which apps behave strangely in the context of their advertised functionality,” he says. “Most of our focus was on apps that ask for permissions that are unnecessary. For example, why would a simple game, like tic-tac-toe, need Internet access or access to the camera, and why would it also wish to send e-mail? Clearly, there is more going on here than just a fun game.”
Smartphone users, in particular, should remain vigilant. “Wherever the ‘action’ is, that’s where the hackers will be,” he says. And right now, the action is in smartphones.
So the next time you see a free app, heed Voas’s warning: “Remember that ‘free’ isn’t necessarily free. All it takes is two or three seconds for malicious apps to access the information stored on your phone and transmit it anywhere.”

costing plans by mobile networks

Analysis firm Ovum studied global use of popular services like Whatsapp, Blackberry Messenger and Facebook chat. It concluded that mobile operators must “work together to face the challenge from major internet players”. Industry experts say operators can offset any losses … Continue reading

Analysis firm Ovum studied global use of popular services like Whatsapp, Blackberry Messenger and Facebook chat.

It concluded that mobile operators must “work together to face the challenge from major internet players”.

Industry experts say operators can offset any losses through effective costing plans by mobile networks.

The report gathered usage statistics from the leading social messaging applications typically used on smartphones across the world.

As well as well-known names from popular social networks in the Western world, the study also included apps such as MXit – a massively popular program used mainly in South Africa.

Social messaging apps make use of a smartphone’s internet connection to send messages rather than the usually far costlier SMS – short message service – system.

unlimited data plans

AT&T Inc. is effectively ending unlimited data plans, saying that it will no longer let customers use more than a set amount of data per month without penalty. Under a new policy, AT&T will slow download speeds for unlimited 3G and … Continue reading

AT&T Inc. is effectively ending unlimited data plans, saying that it will no longer let customers use more than a set amount of data per month without penalty.
Under a new policy, AT&T will slow download speeds for unlimited 3G and 4G smartphone customers who exceed three gigabytes and 4G LTE users who exceed five gigabytes of data in a given month. AT&T had previously been slowing speeds, or throttling, customers who were in the top 5% of data users in their respective market.

AT&T has been trying to manage capacity on its network in the face of heavy data consumption by Apple Inc. iPhone users and a limited supply of wireless airwaves, or spectrum. The carrier is spending billions to build out a new fourth-generation mobile-broadband network that can handle more data traffic.
A spokesman, Mark Siegel, said the new guidelines were necessary because of confusion among unlimited customers over when their download speeds would be slowed. He declined to say by how much the speeds would be decreased.
Now, AT&T says customers will get a text message when their usage approaches 3GB in one billing cycle. AT&T will slow customers’ data speeds for the rest of that billing cycle.
After that, speeds go back to normal if customers stay under the limit. But if they exceed the limit again, customers’ speeds get slowed without receiving another text-message reminder.
In 2010, AT&T was the first carrier to introduce so-called tiered pricing plans which capped customers’ data use. It allowed existing customers to keep their unlimited data plans indefinitely. About 56% of AT&T’s smartphone customers are on the tiered plans, the carrier said Wednesday.
The Dallas-based carrier in January boosted the prices of the tiered plans by as much as 33% while increasing the amount of data allowed per month.
AT&T and other carriers have been pushing Congress and the Federal Communications Commission to release more licenses for wireless airwaves to help stave off a capacity crunch as more customers download video, music and photos to their smartphones.
The data caps aren’t the only moves the Dallas-based telecommunications giant is taking to manage its network. In recent weeks, the carrier has begun sending out notices to some customers still using cellphones on its older 2G cellular network to swap out their devices for newer ones that can run on 3G networks.
“Your current, older-model 2G phone might not be able to make or receive calls and you may experience degradation of your wireless service in certain areas,” AT&T cautioned in the letter. Mr. Siegel said the carrier hoped to use some of the 2G spectrum for new technologies, though it would still offer 2G services to those who want them.
“We’re simply urging them to upgrade to a new device if they want to,” Mr. Siegel said.
Mr. Siegel said the carrier sent the notices to customers in the New York metropolitan area and may send them to other customers. He noted the program was voluntary and affected a small number of subscribers and most 2G phones would continue to work.
AT&T is offering the users one of four free phones, such as the Samsung Electronics Co. Evergreen or the LG Electronics Inc. GU295.


Jane Foody’s iPhone is practically her personal assistant.
The 27-year-old physical therapist and yoga instructor from Yonkers, NY, uses her iPhone for everything, from scheduling appointments, to streaming music during lessons, to showing her clients how to properly strike a downward dog pose.
But last month, AT&T threatened to shut down Jane’s personal assistant. AT&T sent Jane a text message saying that she was using too much data on her unlimited data plan, and that they could block her access to high-speed data. Jane says her iPhone would be useless for anything but making phone calls and sending text messages, and she’s not happy about it.
Jane started a petition on Change.org calling on AT&T to stop slowing down data and respect the unlimited data plans paid for by customers. AT&T is digging in its heels after 10,000 people already signed Jane’s petition. The company responded to the campaign by saying customers with unlimited plans can only access three gigabytes of data per month — meaning unlimited plans no longer exist!
Jane isn’t the only AT&T customer being accused of using “too much” data on unlimited plans. A huge article from the Associated Press revealed just weeks ago that AT&T is similarly targeting the top 5% of its “unlimited” data customers, or nearly 850,000 people.
Jane says she tried to file a complaint with AT&T about being unable to use her unlimited data, but the only responses she says she got were from sales representatives pushing her to pay more money to be able to use as much data as she wants. “I told them, ‘I shouldn’t need to do that since I have unlimited data,’” Jane said.
Cell phone companies have listened to customer outrage before: in December, more than 166,000 Change.org members successfully pushed Verizon to cancel a new fee to pay bills online. Jane hopes that if enough people speak out to AT&T, the cell phone company will also buckle and listen to their customers.
Thanks for being a change-maker,
– Jon, William, Jess, Tim, Michael, and the Change.org team