the Universal Principles of Persuasion

Published on Nov 26, 2012 For more visit our blog at http://www.insideinfluence.com Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University. Dr. Robert Cialdini & Steve Martin are co-authors (together with Dr. Noah Goldstein) of the New York Times, Wall Street […]

Published on Nov 26, 2012

For more visit our blog at http://www.insideinfluence.com

Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University.

Dr. Robert Cialdini & Steve Martin are co-authors (together with Dr. Noah Goldstein) of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Business Week International Bestseller Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to be Persuasive.

US Amazon http://tinyurl.com/afbam9g


Unconscious Decision Making

Published on Jul 26, 2012 Instinct is the driving force behind human decision making. Irrationality must be recognized if we’re going to get beyond the risks of not being built as thinking machines, says David Ropeik. David P. Ropeik is … Continue reading

Published on Jul 26, 2012 Instinct is the driving force behind human decision making. Irrationality must be recognized if we’re going to get beyond the risks of not being built as thinking machines, says David Ropeik. David P. Ropeik is an international consultant, author, teacher, and speaker on risk perception and risk communication.[1] He is also creator and director of Improving Media Coverage of Risk, a training program for journalists. He is a regular contributor to Big Think,[2] Psychology Today,[3] Cognoscenti,[4] and the Huffington Post.[5] http://bigthink.com


Published on Nov 26, 2012 Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University. Dr. Robert Cialdini & Steve Martin are co-authors (together with Dr. Noah Goldstein) of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Business Week International Bestseller Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to be Persuasive. US Amazon http://tinyurl.com/afbam9g UK Amazon http://tinyurl.com/adxrp6c IAW USA: http://www.influenceatwork.com IAW UK: http://www.influenceatwork.co.uk/


Nobel Prize winning neuropsychiatrist Eric Kandel describes new research which hints at the possibility of a biological basis to the unconscious mind. Directed / Produced by Elizabeth Rodd and Jonathan Fowler

Eric Richard Kandel (born November 7, 1929) is an American neuropsychiatrist. He was a recipient of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on the physiological basis of memory storage in neurons. He shared the prize with Arvid Carlsson and Paul Greengard.

Kandel, who had studied psychoanalysis, wanted to understand how memory works. His mentor, Harry Grundfest, said, “If you want to understand the brain you’re going to have to take a reductionist approach, one cell at a time.” So Kandel studied the neural system of the sea slug Aplysia californica, which has large nerve cells amenable to experimental manipulation and is a member of the simplest group of animals known to be capable of learning.[1]

Starting in 1966 James Schwartz collaborated with Kandel on a biochemical analysis of changes in neurons associated with learning and memory storage. By this time it was known that long-term memory, unlike short-term memory, involved the synthesis of new proteins. By 1972 they had evidence that the second messenger molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) was produced in Aplysia ganglia under conditions that cause short-term memory formation (sensitization). In 1974 Kandel moved his lab moved to Columbia University and became founding director of the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior. It was soon found that the neurotransmitter serotonin, acting to produce the second messenger cAMP, is involved in the molecular basis of sensitization of the gill-withdrawal reflex. By 1980, collaboration with Paul Greengard resulted in demonstration that cAMP-dependent protein kinase, also known as protein kinase A (PKA), acted in this biochemical pathway in response to elevated levels of cAMP. Steven Siegelbaum identified a potassium channel that could be regulated by PKA, coupling serotonin’s effects to altered synaptic electrophysiology. In 1983 Kandel helped form the Howard Hughes Medical Research Institute at Columbia devoted to molecular neural science. The Kandel lab then sought to identify proteins that had to be synthesized to convert short-term memories into long-lasting memories. One of the nuclear targets for PKA is the transcriptional control protein CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). In collaboration with David Glanzman and Craig Bailey, Kandel identified CREB as being a protein involved in long-term memory storage. One result of CREB activation is an increase in the number of synaptic connections. Thus, short-term memory had been linked to functional changes in existing synapses, while long-term memory was associated with a change in the number of synaptic connections. Some of the synaptic changes observed by Kandel’s laboratory provide examples of Hebbian learning. One article describes the role of Hebbian learning in the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex.[4] The Kandel lab has also performed important experiments using transgenic mice as a system for investigating the molecular basis of memory storage in the vertebrate hippocampus.[5][6][7] Kandel’s original idea that learning mechanisms would be conserved between all animals has been confirmed. Neurotransmitters, second messenger systems, protein kinasesion channels, and transcription factors like CREB have been confirmed to function in both vertebrate and invertebrate learning and memory storage.[8][9]

Kandel is a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He is a Senior Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He was also the founding director of the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, which is now the Department of Neuroscience at Columbia University. Kandel’s popularized account chronicling his life and research, In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind,[2] was awarded the 2006 Los Angeles Times Book Awardfor Science and Technology.


Learn every gesture and body language cue in one video. Eye, hand, leg, arm, and mouth gestures are completely covered. Gestures and Body Language Series Be an expert in body language. Applies to his and her body language. Article is here http://bit.ly/apSipQ


The Power Of Persuasion and helping behavior

CROSS-CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN HELPING STRANGERS, ROBERT V. LEVINE, ARA NORENZAYAN, KAREN PHILBRICK http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helping_behavior Helping is influenced by economic environment within the culture. In general, frequency of helping behavior is inversely related to the country economic status. The major explanation for people failing … Continue reading

CROSS-CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN HELPING STRANGERS,
ROBERT V. LEVINE,
ARA NORENZAYAN,
KAREN PHILBRICK

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helping_behavior

Helping is influenced by economic environment within the culture. In general, frequency of helping behavior is inversely related to the country economic status.

The major explanation for people failing to stop and help a victim is how obsessed with haste they are. People who were in a hurry did not even notice the victim, although, once they arrived at their destination and had time to think about the consequences, they felt some guilt and anxiousness.

Read more: http://www.experiment-resources.com/helping-behavior.html#ixzz1bWhUDhWT

http://ayn-rand.info/cth–25-Why_Did_Kitty_Genovese_Die.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kitty_Genovese

http://peopletriggers.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/the-six-weapons-of-influence-part-3-social-proof/

http://www.experiment-resources.com/helping-behavior.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asch_conformity_experiments

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Cialdini

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/102780/7621597.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15382273

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15398332