Sanskrit

Sanskrit (/ˈsænskrɪt/; संस्कृतम् saṃskṛtam [səmskr̩t̪əm], originally संस्कृता वाक् saṃskṛtā vāk, “refined speech”) is a standardized dialect of Old-Indo-Aryan, the primary liturgical language of Hinduism, philosophical language in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and a scholarly literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in the Indian cultural zone. Originating as Vedic Sanskrit and tracing its linguistic ancestry back to Proto-Indo-Iranian and ultimately to Proto-Indo-European, today it is listed as one of the 22 scheduled languages of India[3] and is an official language of the state ofUttarakhand.[4] Sanskrit holds a prominent position in Indo-European studies.

The corpus of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of poetry and drama as well as scientific, technical, philosophical and dharma texts. Sanskrit continues to be widely used as a ceremonial language in Hindu religious rituals and Buddhist practice in the forms of hymns and mantras. Spoken Sanskrit has been revived in some villages with traditional institutions, and there are attempts at further popularisation.


Sanskrit grammar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The grammar of the Sanskrit language has a complex verbal system, rich nominal declension, and extensive use of compound nouns. It was studied and codified by Sanskrit grammariansfrom the later Vedic period (roughly 8th century BC), culminating in the Pāṇinian grammar of the 4th century BC.


Sanskrit (/ˈsænskrɪt/; संस्कृतम् saṃskṛtam [səmskr̩t̪əm], originally संस्कृता वाक् saṃskṛtā vāk, “refined speech”) is a standardized dialect of Old-Indo-Aryan, the primary liturgical language of Hinduism, philosophical language in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and a scholarly literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in the Indian cultural zone. Originating as Vedic Sanskrit and tracing its linguistic ancestry back to Proto-Indo-Iranian and ultimately to Proto-Indo-European, today it is listed as one of the 22 scheduled languages of India[3] and is an official language of the state of Uttarakhand.[4] Sanskrit holds a prominent position in Indo-European studies.
The corpus of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of poetry and drama as well as scientific, technical, philosophical and dharma texts. Sanskrit continues to be widely used as a ceremonial language in Hindu religious rituals and Buddhist practice in the forms of hymns and mantras. Spoken Sanskrit has been revived in some villages with traditional institutions, and there are attempts at further popularisation.


Sanskrit is the classical language of Indian and the liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. It is also one of the 22 official languages of India. The name Sanskrit means “refined”, “consecrated” and “sanctified”. It has always been regarded as the ‘high’ language and used mainly for religious and scientific discourse.
Vedic Sanskrit, the pre-Classical form of the language and the liturgical language of the Vedic religion, is one of the earliest attested members of the Indo-European language family. The oldest known text in Sanskrit, the Rigveda, a collection of over a thousand Hindu hymns, composed during the 2nd millenium BC.
Today Sanskrit is used mainly in Hindu religious rituals as a ceremonial language for hymns and mantras. Efforts are also being made to revive Sanskrit as an everyday spoken language in the village of Mattur near Shimoga in Karnataka. A modern form of Sanskrit is one of the 17 official home languages in India.
Since the late 19th century, Sanskrit has been written mostly with the Devanāgarī alphabet. However it has also been written with all the other alphabets of India, except Gurmukhi and Tamil, and with other alphabets such as Thai and Tibetan. The Grantha, Sharda and Siddham alphabets are used only for Sanskrit.
Since the late 18th century, Sanskrit has also been written with the Latin alphabet. The most commonly used system is the International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration (IAST), which was been the standard for academic work since 1912.

Devanāgarī alphabet for Sanskrit

Vowels and vowel diacritics (घोष / ghoṣa)

Sanskrit vowels and vowel diacritics

Consonants (व्यञ्जन / vyajjana)

Sanskrit consonants

Conjunct consonants (संयोग / saṅyoga)

There are about a thousand conjunct consonants, most of which combine two or three consonants. There are also some with four-consonant conjuncts and at least one well-known conjunct with five consonants. Here’s a selection of commonly-used conjuncts:
A selection of Sanskrit conjunct consonants
You can find a full list of conjunct consonants used for Sanskrit at:
http://sanskrit.gde.to/learning_tutorial_wikner/P058.html

Numerals (संख्या / saṇkhyā)

Sanskrit numerals and numbers from 0-10

Sample text in Sanskrit

सर्वे मानवाः स्वतन्त्राः समुत्पन्नाः वर्तन्ते अपि च, गौरवदृशा अधिकारदृशा च समानाः एव वर्तन्ते। एते सर्वे चेतना-तर्क-शक्तिभ्यां सुसम्पन्नाः सन्ति। अपि च, सर्वेऽपि बन्धुत्व-भावनया परस्परं व्यवहरन्तु।
Translated into Sanskrit by Arvind Iyengar
Transliteration
Sarvē mānavāḥ svatantrāḥ samutpannāḥ vartantē api ca, gauravadr̥śā adhikāradr̥śā ca samānāḥ ēva vartantē. Ētē sarvē cētanā-tarka-śaktibhyāṁ susampannāḥ santi. Api ca, sarvē’pi bandhutva-bhāvanayā parasparaṁ vyavaharantu.
A recording of this text by Muralikrishnan Ramasamy

Another version of this text

सर्वे मानवाः जन्मना स्वतन्त्राः वैयक्तिकगौरवेण अधिकारेण च तुल्याः एव । सर्वेषां विवेकः आत्मसाक्षी च वर्तते । सर्वे परस्परं भ्रातृभावेन व्यवहरेयुः ॥
Transliteration (by Stefán Steinsson)
Sarvē mānavāḥ janmanā svatantrāḥ vaiyaktikagauravēṇa adhikārēṇa ca tulyāḥ ēva, sarvēṣāṃ vivēkaḥ ātmasākṣī ca vartatē, sarvē parasparaṃ bhrātṛbhāvēna vyavaharēyuḥ.
A recording of this text
Translation and recording by Shriramana Sharma

Translation

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Links

Information about the Sanskrit language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit
http://www.sanskrit-sanscrito.com.ar
http://sanskritroots.com
http://omkarananda-ashram.org/Sanskrit/Itranslt.html
http://www.samskrtam.org/
http://www.americansanskrit.com
http://www.sanskritstudies.org
Online Sanskrit lessons
http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/olcourse/sanskrit.htm
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/eieol/vedol-0-X.html
http://www.elportaldelaindia.com/El_Portal_de_la_India_Antigua/Sánscrito.html
Sanskrit phrases
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Sanskrit/Everyday_Phrases
http://or.girgit.chitthajagat.in/samskrit.wordpress.com/
Sanskrit dictionaries
http://www.uni-koeln.de/phil-fak/indologie/tamil/cap_search.html
http://aa2411s.aa.tufs.ac.jp/~tjun/sktdic
http://pauillac.inria.fr/~huet/SKT/DICO/index.html
http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/olcourse/sanskrit.htm
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/eieol/vedol-0-X.html
http://www.elportaldelaindia.com/El_Portal_de_la_India_Antigua/Sánscrito.html
http://sourceforge.net/projects/dhatu-patha/
Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon
http://webapps.uni-koeln.de/tamil/
Devanagari fonts and keyboards
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_Devanagari.html
http://www.kiranfont.com
http://www.devanagarifonts.net
http://www.sanskritweb.net/cakram/
Sanskrit Library – contains digitized Sanskrit texts and various tools to analyse them
http://sanskritlibrary.org/
Samskrita Bharati – an organisation established as an experiment in 1981 in Bangalore to bring Sanskrit back into daily life: http://www.samskrita-bharati.org/
Sanskrit Voice – a community of Sanskrit lovers
http://sanskritvoice.com
An archive of Sanskrit dictionaries, readers & grammars in German, English & Russian. (circa 4000 Mb Book Scans, devanagari fonts): http://groups.google.com/group/Nagari
Free Diwali Cards
http://www.diwali-cards.com
http://www.123diwali.com/


Some free resources on the web for learning Sanskrit:

1.)A Practical Sanskrit Introductory – Charles Wikner

http://sanskritdocuments.org/learning_tutorial_wikner/

2.)The website of “Acharya”, SDL, IIT-Madras:

http://acharya.iitm.ac.in/sanskrit/tutor.php

3.)An Analytical Cross Referenced Sanskrit Grammar – Lennart Warnemyr:

http://www.warnemyr.com/skrgram/

4.)A Taiwanese website from the “Museum of Buddhist Studies” to teach yourself Sanskrit:

http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/olcourse/sanskrit.htm

5.)Learning resources from the Sanskrit Religions Institute, U.S.A (the site also has links to other sites offering free learning resources) :

http://www.sanskrit.org/www/Sanskrit/sanskrit.htm

6.)Learning resources from Shirali Chitrapur Math’s website in PDF format (Chitrapur is a coastal town located near Honnavar, Uttara Kannada District, Karnataka):

http://www.chitrapurmath.net/sanskrit/step-by-step.htm

7.)U.K.-India’s online lessons:

http://www.ukindia.com/zip/zsan01.htm

8.)E-books from Sri Satya Sai Veda Pratistan, Puttaparthi:

http://www.vedamu.org/Sankrit/sankritmain.asp

9.)From the website of Dr. Satyavati Sriperumbuduru Kandala:

http://www.kandala.org/ClassMaterial.html

10.)Learning resources from Kalidasa Samskrita Kendram, Kanchipuram (resources include lessons as well as a free dictionary):

http://www.geocities.com/vcgrajan/kendram.html

11.)Shri Aurobindo Ashram’s Sanskrit learning resources:

http://sanskrit.sriaurobindoashram.org.in/

12.)A “teach yourself Sanskrit” freeware by the venerable Prof.Sudhir Kaicker:

http://www.sanskrit-lamp.org/

13.)An enthusiastic effort to teach Sanskrit online by Vasudeva Bhat, C.F.T.R.I., Mysore, Karnataka:

http://www.ourkarnataka.com/learnsan…skrit_main.htm

14.)Sringeri Mutt’s free learning resources:

http://www.svbf.org/sringeri/journal…/sanskrit.html

15.)”Master Sanskrit Easily” by by Dr. Narayan Kansara, Ahmedabad:

http://sanskritdocuments.org/learning_tools

16.) A learning resource put up online by two gentlemen who go by the names, Gabriel ‘Pradīpaka’ & Andrés ‘Muni’.

http://www.sanskrit-sanscrito.com.ar…entingles.html

17.)The following website gives several resources for learning Sanskrit. Go to the bottom of the page, where you will find several downloadable lessons in PDF format by Sanskrit Bharati of Bangalore, an organization that has widespread following and which aims to promote spoken Sanskrit.

http://sanskritdocuments.org/learnin…ing_tools.html

18.) Vaman Shivaram Apte’s Sanskrit Dictionary online:

http://aa2411s.aa.tufs.ac.jp/%7Etjun/sktdic/

19.) Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon, which also contains a Tamil-English Dictionary (Sanskrit-English dictionary part has been adapted from the famous Monier-Williams’ ‘Sanskrit-English Dictionary’):

http://webapps.uni-koeln.de/tamil/

20.)The mother of all Sanskrit resources:

http://www.sanskritdocuments.org/

21.)Geral Huet’s Sanskrit Dictionary & other resources:

http://sanskrit.inria.fr/sanskrit.html

It is amazing how people spend their time & money, and battle out to keep this language alive!

Last edited by kspv; 24-04-2007 at 12:45 PM.

Sanskrit (/?sænskr?t/; ????????? sa?sk?tam [s?mskr?t??m], originally ???????? ???? sa?sk?t? v?k, “refined speech”) is a standardized dialect of Old-Indo-Aryan, the primary liturgical language of Hinduism, philosophical language in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and a scholarly literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in the Indian cultural zone. Originating as Vedic Sanskrit and tracing its linguistic ancestry back to Proto-Indo-Iranian and ultimately to Proto-Indo-European, today it is listed as one of the 22 scheduled languages of India[3] and is an official language of the state ofUttarakhand.[4] Sanskrit holds a prominent position in Indo-European studies.

The corpus of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of poetry and drama as well as scientific, technical, philosophical and dharma texts. Sanskrit continues to be widely used as a ceremonial language in Hindu religious rituals and Buddhist practice in the forms of hymns and mantras. Spoken Sanskrit has been revived in some villages with traditional institutions, and there are attempts at further popularisation.


Sanskrit grammar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The grammar of the Sanskrit language has a complex verbal system, rich nominal declension, and extensive use of compound nouns. It was studied and codified by Sanskrit grammariansfrom the later Vedic period (roughly 8th century BC), culminating in the P??inian grammar of the 4th century BC.


Sanskrit (/?sænskr?t/; ????????? sa?sk?tam [s?mskr?t??m], originally ???????? ???? sa?sk?t? v?k, “refined speech”) is a standardized dialect of Old-Indo-Aryan, the primary liturgical language of Hinduism, philosophical language in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and a scholarly literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in the Indian cultural zone. Originating as Vedic Sanskrit and tracing its linguistic ancestry back to Proto-Indo-Iranian and ultimately to Proto-Indo-European, today it is listed as one of the 22 scheduled languages of India[3] and is an official language of the state of Uttarakhand.[4] Sanskrit holds a prominent position in Indo-European studies.
The corpus of Sanskrit literature encompasses a rich tradition of poetry and drama as well as scientific, technical, philosophical and dharma texts. Sanskrit continues to be widely used as a ceremonial language in Hindu religious rituals and Buddhist practice in the forms of hymns and mantras. Spoken Sanskrit has been revived in some villages with traditional institutions, and there are attempts at further popularisation.


Sanskrit is the classical language of Indian and the liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. It is also one of the 22 official languages of India. The name Sanskrit means “refined”, “consecrated” and “sanctified”. It has always been regarded as the ‘high’ language and used mainly for religious and scientific discourse.
Vedic Sanskrit, the pre-Classical form of the language and the liturgical language of the Vedic religion, is one of the earliest attested members of the Indo-European language family. The oldest known text in Sanskrit, the Rigveda, a collection of over a thousand Hindu hymns, composed during the 2nd millenium BC.
Today Sanskrit is used mainly in Hindu religious rituals as a ceremonial language for hymns and mantras. Efforts are also being made to revive Sanskrit as an everyday spoken language in the village of Mattur near Shimoga in Karnataka. A modern form of Sanskrit is one of the 17 official home languages in India.
Since the late 19th century, Sanskrit has been written mostly with the Devan?gar? alphabet. However it has also been written with all the other alphabets of India, except Gurmukhi and Tamil, and with other alphabets such as Thai and Tibetan. The Grantha, Sharda and Siddham alphabets are used only for Sanskrit.
Since the late 18th century, Sanskrit has also been written with the Latin alphabet. The most commonly used system is the International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration (IAST), which was been the standard for academic work since 1912.

Devan?gar? alphabet for Sanskrit

Vowels and vowel diacritics (??? / gho?a)

Sanskrit vowels and vowel diacritics

Consonants (??????? / vyajjana)

Sanskrit consonants

Conjunct consonants (????? / sa?yoga)

There are about a thousand conjunct consonants, most of which combine two or three consonants. There are also some with four-consonant conjuncts and at least one well-known conjunct with five consonants. Here’s a selection of commonly-used conjuncts:
A selection of Sanskrit conjunct consonants
You can find a full list of conjunct consonants used for Sanskrit at:
http://sanskrit.gde.to/learning_tutorial_wikner/P058.html

Numerals (?????? / sa?khy?)

Sanskrit numerals and numbers from 0-10

Sample text in Sanskrit

????? ?????? ??????????? ??????????? ???????? ??? ?, ???????? ?????????? ? ?????? ?? ????????? ??? ????? ?????-????-?????????? ??????????? ?????? ??? ?, ???????? ????????-?????? ??????? ???????????
Translated into Sanskrit by Arvind Iyengar
Transliteration
Sarv? m?nav?? svatantr?? samutpann?? vartant? api ca, gauravadr??? adhik?radr??? ca sam?n?? ?va vartant?. ?t? sarv? c?tan?-tarka-?aktibhy?? susampann?? santi. Api ca, sarv?’pi bandhutva-bh?vanay? paraspara? vyavaharantu.
A recording of this text by Muralikrishnan Ramasamy

Another version of this text

????? ?????? ?????? ??????????? ?????????????? ???????? ? ??????? ?? ? ???????? ?????? ?????????? ? ?????? ? ????? ??????? ??????????? ?????????? ?
Transliteration (by Stefán Steinsson)
Sarv? m?nav?? janman? svatantr?? vaiyaktikagaurav??a adhik?r??a ca tuly?? ?va, sarv???? viv?ka? ?tmas?k?? ca vartat?, sarv? paraspara? bhr?t?bh?v?na vyavahar?yu?.
A recording of this text
Translation and recording by Shriramana Sharma

Translation

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Links

Information about the Sanskrit language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit
http://www.sanskrit-sanscrito.com.ar
http://sanskritroots.com
http://omkarananda-ashram.org/Sanskrit/Itranslt.html
http://www.samskrtam.org/
http://www.americansanskrit.com
http://www.sanskritstudies.org
Online Sanskrit lessons
http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/olcourse/sanskrit.htm
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/eieol/vedol-0-X.html
http://www.elportaldelaindia.com/El_Portal_de_la_India_Antigua/Sánscrito.html
Sanskrit phrases
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Sanskrit/Everyday_Phrases
http://or.girgit.chitthajagat.in/samskrit.wordpress.com/
Sanskrit dictionaries
http://www.uni-koeln.de/phil-fak/indologie/tamil/cap_search.html
http://aa2411s.aa.tufs.ac.jp/~tjun/sktdic
http://pauillac.inria.fr/~huet/SKT/DICO/index.html
http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/olcourse/sanskrit.htm
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/lrc/eieol/vedol-0-X.html
http://www.elportaldelaindia.com/El_Portal_de_la_India_Antigua/Sánscrito.html
http://sourceforge.net/projects/dhatu-patha/
Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon
http://webapps.uni-koeln.de/tamil/
Devanagari fonts and keyboards
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_Devanagari.html
http://www.kiranfont.com
http://www.devanagarifonts.net
http://www.sanskritweb.net/cakram/
Sanskrit Library – contains digitized Sanskrit texts and various tools to analyse them
http://sanskritlibrary.org/
Samskrita Bharati – an organisation established as an experiment in 1981 in Bangalore to bring Sanskrit back into daily life: http://www.samskrita-bharati.org/
Sanskrit Voice – a community of Sanskrit lovers
http://sanskritvoice.com
An archive of Sanskrit dictionaries, readers & grammars in German, English & Russian. (circa 4000 Mb Book Scans, devanagari fonts): http://groups.google.com/group/Nagari
Free Diwali Cards
http://www.diwali-cards.com
http://www.123diwali.com/


Some free resources on the web for learning Sanskrit:

1.)A Practical Sanskrit Introductory – Charles Wikner

http://sanskritdocuments.org/learning_tutorial_wikner/

2.)The website of “Acharya”, SDL, IIT-Madras:

http://acharya.iitm.ac.in/sanskrit/tutor.php

3.)An Analytical Cross Referenced Sanskrit Grammar – Lennart Warnemyr:

http://www.warnemyr.com/skrgram/

4.)A Taiwanese website from the “Museum of Buddhist Studies” to teach yourself Sanskrit:

http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/DBLM/olcourse/sanskrit.htm

5.)Learning resources from the Sanskrit Religions Institute, U.S.A (the site also has links to other sites offering free learning resources) :

http://www.sanskrit.org/www/Sanskrit/sanskrit.htm

6.)Learning resources from Shirali Chitrapur Math’s website in PDF format (Chitrapur is a coastal town located near Honnavar, Uttara Kannada District, Karnataka):

http://www.chitrapurmath.net/sanskrit/step-by-step.htm

7.)U.K.-India’s online lessons:

http://www.ukindia.com/zip/zsan01.htm

8.)E-books from Sri Satya Sai Veda Pratistan, Puttaparthi:

http://www.vedamu.org/Sankrit/sankritmain.asp

9.)From the website of Dr. Satyavati Sriperumbuduru Kandala:

http://www.kandala.org/ClassMaterial.html

10.)Learning resources from Kalidasa Samskrita Kendram, Kanchipuram (resources include lessons as well as a free dictionary):

http://www.geocities.com/vcgrajan/kendram.html

11.)Shri Aurobindo Ashram’s Sanskrit learning resources:

http://sanskrit.sriaurobindoashram.org.in/

12.)A “teach yourself Sanskrit” freeware by the venerable Prof.Sudhir Kaicker:

http://www.sanskrit-lamp.org/

13.)An enthusiastic effort to teach Sanskrit online by Vasudeva Bhat, C.F.T.R.I., Mysore, Karnataka:

http://www.ourkarnataka.com/learnsan…skrit_main.htm

14.)Sringeri Mutt’s free learning resources:

http://www.svbf.org/sringeri/journal…/sanskrit.html

15.)”Master Sanskrit Easily” by by Dr. Narayan Kansara, Ahmedabad:

http://sanskritdocuments.org/learning_tools

16.) A learning resource put up online by two gentlemen who go by the names, Gabriel ‘Prad?paka’ & Andrés ‘Muni’.

http://www.sanskrit-sanscrito.com.ar…entingles.html

17.)The following website gives several resources for learning Sanskrit. Go to the bottom of the page, where you will find several downloadable lessons in PDF format by Sanskrit Bharati of Bangalore, an organization that has widespread following and which aims to promote spoken Sanskrit.

http://sanskritdocuments.org/learnin…ing_tools.html

18.) Vaman Shivaram Apte’s Sanskrit Dictionary online:

http://aa2411s.aa.tufs.ac.jp/%7Etjun/sktdic/

19.) Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon, which also contains a Tamil-English Dictionary (Sanskrit-English dictionary part has been adapted from the famous Monier-Williams’ ‘Sanskrit-English Dictionary’):

http://webapps.uni-koeln.de/tamil/

20.)The mother of all Sanskrit resources:

http://www.sanskritdocuments.org/

21.)Geral Huet’s Sanskrit Dictionary & other resources:

http://sanskrit.inria.fr/sanskrit.html

It is amazing how people spend their time & money, and battle out to keep this language alive!

Last edited by kspv; 24-04-2007 at 12:45 PM.

?????

Uploaded on May 22, 2011
1999年4月25日發生了震動世界的法輪功萬人北京上訪事件,事件真相被中共封鎖至­今已有15年,”4.25法輪功萬人上訪真相”仍作為被禁的關鍵­詞,被中共嚴密封鎖和抹黑。
那一天,一萬多名法輪大法修煉者從四面八方來到北京國務院信訪辦公室所在地和平請願。­從清晨到夜晚,歷時十多個小時,無暴力、無口號、無擾民、無垃圾、善意平靜,創造了在­中共幾十年極權統治下不曾有過的官民成功對話、圓滿解決問題的獨有範例,也為

Uploaded on May 22, 2011
1999?4?25???????????????????????????????­???15??”4.25?????????”????????­?????????????
????????????????????????????????????????­????????????????????????????????????????­????????????????????????????????????

Kurdish YPG and PKK fighters

Published on Oct 15, 2015
An amazing documentary. War (ISIS, Syria, Iraq). An Israeli journalist visits Kurdish YPG and PKK fighters in Iraqi & Syrian Kurdistan – Interview with ISIS prisoners. How Kurdish female fighters became ISIS’ nightmare, the dismantling of Iraq and Syria as states as we knew them, and more. Please share.

Published on Oct 15, 2015
An amazing documentary. War (ISIS, Syria, Iraq). An Israeli journalist visits Kurdish YPG and PKK fighters in Iraqi & Syrian Kurdistan – Interview with ISIS prisoners. How Kurdish female fighters became ISIS’ nightmare, the dismantling of Iraq and Syria as states as we knew them, and more. Please share.

Chalchiuhtlicue

Chalchiuhtlicue (en náhuatl: chalcihuitlìcue, ‘la que tiene su falda de jade’chalchihuitl, jade; i, su; cueitl, falda; e, que tiene’)? en la mitología mexica es la diosa de los lagos y corrientes de agua. También es patrona de los nacimientos, y desempeña un papel importante en los bautismos aztecas. Preside sobre el día 5 Serpiente y sobre el tricenal de 1 Caña. Fue una de las figuras femeninas más importantes vinculada al líquido en la cultura mesoamericana. Chalchiuhtlicue fue considerada también como la más importante protectora de la navegación costera en el México antiguo.

En el mito de los cinco soles, ella alumbró al mundo en el Primer Sol, dominaba el cuarto mundo, en la era Cuatro-Agua. Durante su reinado el cielo era de agua, la cual cayó sobre la tierra como un gran diluvio a manos de esta diosa. Los seres humanos se transformaron en peces. Pareja o dualidad de Tláloc y con él fue madre de Tecciztécatl y rigió sobre Tlalocan. En su aspecto acuático, es conocida como Acuecucyoticihuati, diosa de los océanos, los ríos y todas las aguas que corren, así como patrona de las parturientas. Se dice también que fue esposa de Xiuhtecuhtli. A veces se la asocia con la diosa de la lluvia, Matlálcueitl.
En el arte, Chalchiuhtlicue se ilustra usando una falda verde y con breves líneas negras verticales en la parte inferior de su rostro. En algunos casos pueden verse niños recién nacidos en una corriente de agua que surge de sus faldas. Se la encuentra representada en varios manuscritos de México, incluyendo las placas 11 y 65 del Códice Borgia (precolombino), en la página 5 del Códice Borbónico del siglo XVI, y en la página 17 del Códice Ríos. Sus esculturas están generalmente hechas de piedra verde, como corresponde a su nombre.

Chalchiuhtlicue (en náhuatl: chalcihuitlìcue, ‘la que tiene su falda de jade’chalchihuitl, jade; i, su; cueitl, falda; e, que tiene’)? en la mitología mexica es la diosa de los lagos y corrientes de agua. También es patrona de los nacimientos, y desempeña un papel importante en los bautismos aztecas. Preside sobre el día 5 Serpiente y sobre el tricenal de 1 Caña. Fue una de las figuras femeninas más importantes vinculada al líquido en la cultura mesoamericana. Chalchiuhtlicue fue considerada también como la más importante protectora de la navegación costera en el México antiguo.

En el mito de los cinco soles, ella alumbró al mundo en el Primer Sol, dominaba el cuarto mundo, en la era Cuatro-Agua. Durante su reinado el cielo era de agua, la cual cayó sobre la tierra como un gran diluvio a manos de esta diosa. Los seres humanos se transformaron en peces. Pareja o dualidad de Tláloc y con él fue madre de Tecciztécatl y rigió sobre Tlalocan. En su aspecto acuático, es conocida como Acuecucyoticihuati, diosa de los océanos, los ríos y todas las aguas que corren, así como patrona de las parturientas. Se dice también que fue esposa de Xiuhtecuhtli. A veces se la asocia con la diosa de la lluvia, Matlálcueitl.
En el arte, Chalchiuhtlicue se ilustra usando una falda verde y con breves líneas negras verticales en la parte inferior de su rostro. En algunos casos pueden verse niños recién nacidos en una corriente de agua que surge de sus faldas. Se la encuentra representada en varios manuscritos de México, incluyendo las placas 11 y 65 del Códice Borgia (precolombino), en la página 5 del Códice Borbónico del siglo XVI, y en la página 17 del Códice Ríos. Sus esculturas están generalmente hechas de piedra verde, como corresponde a su nombre.

Tlazoltéotl

Tlazoltéotl (en náhuatl: tlazōlteōtl, ‘diosa de la inmundicia’tla, prefijo; zōlli, inmundicia; téōtl, dios’)? Deidad de origen Huasteco, que en la mitología mexica es la diosa de la lujuria y de los amores ilícitos, patrona de la incontinencia, del adulterio, del sexo, de las pasiones, de la carnalidad y de las transgresiones morales; era la diosa que eliminaba del mundo el pecado y la diosa más relacionada con la sexualidad y con la Luna. En los códices se la representaba en la postura azteca habitual para dar a luz o a veces defecando debido a que los pecados de lujuria se simbolizaban con excrementos. Así como en otros códices aparece sosteniendo “la raíz del diablo”, planta usada para hacer más fuertes los efectos del pulque (bebida relacionada con la inmoralidad) y disminuir los dolores del parto.
Era conocida como “la comedora de suciedad” debido a que se creía que visitaba a la gente que estaba por morir. La diosa Tlazoltéotl mostraba las contradicciones de algunos valores morales sobre la feminidad en la sociedad azteca: traía el sufrimiento con enfermedades venéreas y lo curaba con la medicina, inspiraba las desviaciones sexuales pero a la vez tenía la capacidad de absolverlas, y todo ello siendo diosa madre de la fertilidad, del parto, patrona de los médicos y a la vez diosa cruel que traía locura.
Tlazoltéotl (en náhuatl: tlaz?lte?tl, ‘diosa de la inmundicia’tla, prefijo; z?lli, inmundicia; té?tl, dios’)? Deidad de origen Huasteco, que en la mitología mexica es la diosa de la lujuria y de los amores ilícitos, patrona de la incontinencia, del adulterio, del sexo, de las pasiones, de la carnalidad y de las transgresiones morales; era la diosa que eliminaba del mundo el pecado y la diosa más relacionada con la sexualidad y con la Luna. En los códices se la representaba en la postura azteca habitual para dar a luz o a veces defecando debido a que los pecados de lujuria se simbolizaban con excrementos. Así como en otros códices aparece sosteniendo “la raíz del diablo”, planta usada para hacer más fuertes los efectos del pulque (bebida relacionada con la inmoralidad) y disminuir los dolores del parto.
Era conocida como “la comedora de suciedad” debido a que se creía que visitaba a la gente que estaba por morir. La diosa Tlazoltéotl mostraba las contradicciones de algunos valores morales sobre la feminidad en la sociedad azteca: traía el sufrimiento con enfermedades venéreas y lo curaba con la medicina, inspiraba las desviaciones sexuales pero a la vez tenía la capacidad de absolverlas, y todo ello siendo diosa madre de la fertilidad, del parto, patrona de los médicos y a la vez diosa cruel que traía locura.

Tepeyóllotl

Tepeyóllotl (en náhuatl: tepeyollotl, ‘corazón del monte’tépetl, monte, montaña, cerro; yóllotl, corazón’)? en la mitología mexica es el dios de las montañas y de los ecos, patrono de los jaguares
Tepeyóllotl (en náhuatl: tepeyollotl, ‘corazón del monte’tépetl, monte, montaña, cerro; yóllotl, corazón’)? en la mitología mexica es el dios de las montañas y de los ecos, patrono de los jaguares

Iztli

Iztli (o Itztli) era un dios mexica de piedra, en la forma de un cuchillo de sacrificios.
Servía a Tezcatlipoca como dios de la Segunda Hora de la Noche.
Está asociado con Chalchiuhtlicue y Tlazoltéotl.
Iztli (o Itztli) era un dios mexica de piedra, en la forma de un cuchillo de sacrificios.
Servía a Tezcatlipoca como dios de la Segunda Hora de la Noche.
Está asociado con Chalchiuhtlicue y Tlazoltéotl.

Huehuetéotl

Escultura de Huehuetéotl.
Véase también: Xiuhtecuhtli

Huehuetéotl (en náhuatl: huēhueh-teōtl, ‘dios-viejo’)? es el nombre con el que se conoce genéricamente a la divinidad mesoamericana del fuego. Su culto fue uno de los más antiguos de Mesoamérica, como lo testifican las efigies encontradas en sitios tan antiguos como Cuicuilco y Monte Albán.
En tanto que divinidad solar, estaba relacionado con el calendario. Se le representaba como un anciano arrugado, barbado, desdentado y encorvado. Sentado, Huehuetéotl llevaba un enorme brasero sobre sus espaldas. En otras ocasiones, el mismo brasero era la propia representación del dios. La Serpiente de Fuego (Xiuhtecuhtli) parece haber sido su nahual. Uno de sus símbolos era la cruz de los cuatro rumbos del universo o quincunce, que partían del centro donde él residía.

Escultura de Huehuetéotl.

Huehuetéotl (en náhuatl: hu?hueh-te?tl, ‘dios-viejo’)? es el nombre con el que se conoce genéricamente a la divinidad mesoamericana del fuego. Su culto fue uno de los más antiguos de Mesoamérica, como lo testifican las efigies encontradas en sitios tan antiguos como Cuicuilco y Monte Albán.
En tanto que divinidad solar, estaba relacionado con el calendario. Se le representaba como un anciano arrugado, barbado, desdentado y encorvado. Sentado, Huehuetéotl llevaba un enorme brasero sobre sus espaldas. En otras ocasiones, el mismo brasero era la propia representación del dios. La Serpiente de Fuego (Xiuhtecuhtli) parece haber sido su nahual. Uno de sus símbolos era la cruz de los cuatro rumbos del universo o quincunce, que partían del centro donde él residía.

Tonatiuh

Tonatiuh o Tonatiuhtéotl (en náhuatl: tonatiuh, ‘el sol’tonatiuh, sol’)? en la mitología Azteca es el dios del Sol. El pueblo mexicano lo consideró como el líder del cielo. También fue conocido como el Quinto Sol, debido a que los mexicas creían que asumió el control cuando el Cuarto Sol fue expulsado del cielo, y de acuerdo a su Cosmogonía, cada sol era un dios con su propia era cósmica y según los aztecas, ellos aún se encontraban en la era de Tonatiuh (Nahui-Ollin).
Según cuenta el mito mexica que los dioses, después de la muerte del cuarto sol, buscaban al quinto nuevo sol. Encontraron a dos dioses, a Tecusiztécatl, un hombre cobarde pero orgulloso de sí mismo, y Nanahuatzin, un dios noble y muy pobre. Cuando se sentaron alrededor de la pira (fogata para sacrificios) dijeron los dioses que debían sacrificarse en la misma pira para ser el quinto sol. Tecuciztécatl se metió en la pira y del dolor, se salió. Quedó manchado y se cuenta que así surgieron las manchas en el jaguar. Después de la cobardía de Tecuciztécatl, Nanahuatzin se metió en la pira, salió una chispa hacia el cielo y éste mismo se iluminó, surgiendo así el quinto sol. Luego de ver Tecuciztécatl al dios pobre, que se había convertido en el quinto sol, le dio envidia y se metió en la pira. Así surgió una nueva chispa, se lanzó al cielo y apareció un segundo sol. Era invencible. Llegó el momento en que lo mataron los dioses menores. En todo el trayecto de la batalla de los dioses menores con Tecuciztécatl, Nanahuatzin se quedó callado. El segundo sol, murió porque uno de los dioses menores le lanzó un conejo y lo atravesó. De esta forma, murió y se convirtió en la Luna, y se cuenta que vemos un conejo en la Luna por el conejo que le lanzó el dios. Nanahuatzin luego de esto, se autonombró Tonatiuh.[2]
Así, el dios demandaba sacrificios humanos como tributo y si estos se le rehusaban, él se movería a través del cielo para ocultarse. Cada día exigía dos sacrificios humanos, el corazón de dos personas, para alimentarse después de sus batallas durante la noche, durante el día, lo acompañaban dioses y diosas; las diosas eran llamadas Cihuateteo, y acompañaban a Tonatiuh por haber muerto en el parto, o por algo relacionado con el agua, tanto sequía como inundación; los mexicas estaban fascinados con el sol y lo observaban cuidadosamente, y tenían un calendario solar que estaba en segundo lugar en cuanto a precisión, solamente superado por el calendario de los mayas, donde muchos de los monumentos mexicas que se mantienen en pie en la actualidad, están alineados con el sol, en la Piedra del Sol (conocida como calendario azteca) se representó con un cuchillo de sacrificio como lengua; era dibujado con el disco solar en la espalda y con el cuerpo y la cara rojos.
Al conquistador español Pedro de Alvarado se le atribuyó el nombre de Tonatiuh por su pelo rubio y ojos celestes.[3] El icono del sol de manera ancestral era el águila, en náhuatl cuauhtli.
Tonatiuh o Tonatiuhtéotl (en náhuatl: tonatiuh, ‘el sol’tonatiuh, sol’)? en la mitología Azteca es el dios del Sol. El pueblo mexicano lo consideró como el líder del cielo. También fue conocido como el Quinto Sol, debido a que los mexicas creían que asumió el control cuando el Cuarto Sol fue expulsado del cielo, y de acuerdo a su Cosmogonía, cada sol era un dios con su propia era cósmica y según los aztecas, ellos aún se encontraban en la era de Tonatiuh (Nahui-Ollin).
Según cuenta el mito mexica que los dioses, después de la muerte del cuarto sol, buscaban al quinto nuevo sol. Encontraron a dos dioses, a Tecusiztécatl, un hombre cobarde pero orgulloso de sí mismo, y Nanahuatzin, un dios noble y muy pobre. Cuando se sentaron alrededor de la pira (fogata para sacrificios) dijeron los dioses que debían sacrificarse en la misma pira para ser el quinto sol. Tecuciztécatl se metió en la pira y del dolor, se salió. Quedó manchado y se cuenta que así surgieron las manchas en el jaguar. Después de la cobardía de Tecuciztécatl, Nanahuatzin se metió en la pira, salió una chispa hacia el cielo y éste mismo se iluminó, surgiendo así el quinto sol. Luego de ver Tecuciztécatl al dios pobre, que se había convertido en el quinto sol, le dio envidia y se metió en la pira. Así surgió una nueva chispa, se lanzó al cielo y apareció un segundo sol. Era invencible. Llegó el momento en que lo mataron los dioses menores. En todo el trayecto de la batalla de los dioses menores con Tecuciztécatl, Nanahuatzin se quedó callado. El segundo sol, murió porque uno de los dioses menores le lanzó un conejo y lo atravesó. De esta forma, murió y se convirtió en la Luna, y se cuenta que vemos un conejo en la Luna por el conejo que le lanzó el dios. Nanahuatzin luego de esto, se autonombró Tonatiuh.[2]
Así, el dios demandaba sacrificios humanos como tributo y si estos se le rehusaban, él se movería a través del cielo para ocultarse. Cada día exigía dos sacrificios humanos, el corazón de dos personas, para alimentarse después de sus batallas durante la noche, durante el día, lo acompañaban dioses y diosas; las diosas eran llamadas Cihuateteo, y acompañaban a Tonatiuh por haber muerto en el parto, o por algo relacionado con el agua, tanto sequía como inundación; los mexicas estaban fascinados con el sol y lo observaban cuidadosamente, y tenían un calendario solar que estaba en segundo lugar en cuanto a precisión, solamente superado por el calendario de los mayas, donde muchos de los monumentos mexicas que se mantienen en pie en la actualidad, están alineados con el sol, en la Piedra del Sol (conocida como calendario azteca) se representó con un cuchillo de sacrificio como lengua; era dibujado con el disco solar en la espalda y con el cuerpo y la cara rojos.
Al conquistador español Pedro de Alvarado se le atribuyó el nombre de Tonatiuh por su pelo rubio y ojos celestes.[3] El icono del sol de manera ancestral era el águila, en náhuatl cuauhtli.

Cintéotl

Cintéotl o Centéotl (en náhuatl: cinteotl, ‘dios del maíz’cintli, maíz; teotl, dios’)? en la mitología mexica es el dios del maíz, en ocasiones es considerado como un ser dual, hombre y mujer, o bien solo del sexo masculino mientras en sexo femenino pasó a ser Chicomecóatl, que según la Cosmogonía mexica nació de la unión de Piltzintecuhtli, dios de los temporales, y Xochiquétzal, diosa de la belleza, de las flores, de la juventud y de la fertilidad, patrona de las jóvenes, del embarazo, de los partos y de los oficios de las mujeres, que tras su nacimiento se refugió bajo la tierra convirtiéndose en distintos sustentos, de entre ellos, el maíz divinizado. Entre sus diversos cultos se le celebraba junto a Chicomecóatl, la diosa de la agricultura, de las cosechas y de la fecundidad, en los meses de “Huey tozoztli” y “Huey tecuilhuitl” sacrificando a una cautiva.
Cintéotl o Centéotl (en náhuatl: cinteotl, ‘dios del maíz’cintli, maíz; teotl, dios’)? en la mitología mexica es el dios del maíz, en ocasiones es considerado como un ser dual, hombre y mujer, o bien solo del sexo masculino mientras en sexo femenino pasó a ser Chicomecóatl, que según la Cosmogonía mexica nació de la unión de Piltzintecuhtli, dios de los temporales, y Xochiquétzal, diosa de la belleza, de las flores, de la juventud y de la fertilidad, patrona de las jóvenes, del embarazo, de los partos y de los oficios de las mujeres, que tras su nacimiento se refugió bajo la tierra convirtiéndose en distintos sustentos, de entre ellos, el maíz divinizado. Entre sus diversos cultos se le celebraba junto a Chicomecóatl, la diosa de la agricultura, de las cosechas y de la fecundidad, en los meses de “Huey tozoztli” y “Huey tecuilhuitl” sacrificando a una cautiva.