Under The Dome

The Pollution Documentary China’s Government Doesn’t Want You To See [Stuff to Watch] On 13th March, 2015 Web Culture The film was watched more than 100 million times in the first 24 hours alone.Chinese authorities started removing the film from Chinese video … Continue reading

The Pollution Documentary China’s Government Doesn’t Want You To See [Stuff to Watch]

The film was watched more than 100 million times in the first 24 hours alone.Chinese authorities started removing the film from Chinese video hosting services, shortly before the full English translation landed on YouTube. A leaked directive from the Chinese government even orders the media not to report on the film. 

Under The Dome

Simply called Under The Dome — a reference to the cocoon of carcinogens that enshrines many of China’s largest urbanised environments — the documentary is the work of former China Central Television host and respected investigative reporter, Chai Jing.

The documentary was an entirely self-funded affair, and came to being once Chai discovered that her unborn child had a tumour (which was removed shortly after birth) — something she attributes to poor air quality. What follows is a brutally honest glimpse into how China is losing the war on pollution.


Detox fashion

Twenty global fashion leaders have committed to Detox in response to the growing international campaign (Nike, Adidas Puma, H&M, M&S, C&A, Li-Ning, Zara, Mango, Esprit, Levi’s, Uniqlo,Benetton, Victoria’s Secret, G-Star Raw, Valentino, Coop, Canepa, Burberry,Primark). However, other clothing companies, like GAP, … Continue reading

Twenty global fashion leaders have committed to Detox in response to the growing international campaign (Nike, Adidas Puma, H&M, M&S, C&A, Li-Ning, Zara, Mango, Esprit, Levi’s, Uniqlo,Benetton, Victoria’s Secret, G-Star Raw, Valentino, Coop, Canepa, Burberry,Primark). However, other clothing companies, like GAP, American Apparel and Disney still need to respond to the urgency of the situation, Detox their brands and help Detox our future.

Published on Oct 24, 2013

Around the world a growing movement of people are using their creativity, design skills and purchasing power to demand fashion without pollution. United by a shared belief that the clothes we wear should carry a story we can be proud of, activists, bloggers, designers, scientists and models have been able to convince big brands including Zara, Mango, Valentino, UNIQLO and H&M to commit to toxic-free fashion. There is still a long way to go, but our successes so far prove that when we work together, big brands are forced to stand up and deliver.

With special thanks to Nova Heart (http://nova-heart.com) for the use of their track “My Song 9″ from the Beautiful Boys EP, and to Jeff Garner and Prophetik for the use of their footage in the making of this film.

For more information or to find out how you can join the campaign visit: http://greenpeace.org/detox

flying objects

Uploaded on Sep 22, 2008 The AirTraffic team presents the global air traffic (simulation over 24 hours). http://radar.zhaw.ch/ Uploaded on Feb 19, 2010 Courtesy NASA FACET is a simulation tool for exploring advanced air traffic management concepts. An efficient and effective air traffic management system is vital to the U.S. transportation infrastructure. Since 1978, when […]

Uploaded on Sep 22, 2008

The AirTraffic team presents the global air traffic (simulation over 24 hours).
http://radar.zhaw.ch/


Uploaded on Feb 19, 2010

Courtesy NASA

FACET is a simulation tool for exploring advanced air traffic management concepts.
An efficient and effective air traffic management system is vital to the U.S. transportation infrastructure. Since 1978, when the airline industry was deregulated, the inflation adjusted gross domestic product (GDP) has increased by 62 percent. In this same time period, total output of scheduled passenger air transportation (as measured by Revenue Passenger Miles) has increased by 190 percent and total airfreight ton miles have increased by 289 percent. Since 1997, flight delays have skyrocketed – doubling in only four years. These trends are expected to continue. In 1998, airline delays in the U.S. cost industry and passengers $4.5 billion — the equivalent of a 7 percent tax on every dollar collected by all the domestic airlines combined.


Uploaded on Oct 26, 2010

Simulation of Space Debris orbiting Earth. Created by the Institute of Aerospace Systems of the Technische Universität Braunschweig and shown at the 3rd Braunschweig Lichtparcours from June 19th to September 30th, 2010. Also available as an interactive screen saver for windows and Linux athttp://www.days-in-space.de.
More information about our research at http://www.space-debris.de.
Color Key:
Red: Satellites (operational or defunct)
Yellow: Rocket bodies
Green: Mission Related Objects (bolts, lens caps, etc.)
Blue: Solid rocket motor slag
White: Fragments from explosion events

The largest migration in history

Published on Mar 1, 2012
Migration from inland villages to coastal cities has transformed China. Now that is changing, as regional cities inland become the new focus of migration patterns.


Published on Mar 1, 2012
Migration from inland villages to coastal cities has transformed China. Now that is changing, as regional cities inland become the new focus of migration patterns.


Habitat destruction

Uploaded on Mar 30, 2010 Murray Gell-Mann, the 2004-2005 Pardee Visiting Professor of Future Studies, argues that global problems cannot be considered in isolation, and he wonders about the best ways to separate environmental issues from those involving population growth.Run time 1:27 Hosted by Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future on September […]

Uploaded on Mar 30, 2010
Murray Gell-Mann, the 2004-2005 Pardee Visiting Professor of Future Studies, argues that global problems cannot be considered in isolation, and he wonders about the best ways to separate environmental issues from those involving population growth.Run time 1:27

Hosted by Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future on September 27, 2005.


News coverage of environmental issues can be difficult, in part, because those who are affected—whether the effect is economic or environmental—routinely exaggerate their claims. Non-governmental organization advocates pull “facts” in one direction; big
business tugs them in another, and sometimes neither leaves the cushy offices in the northwest section of Washington, D.C. Truth resides in a place somewhere in between.


Preventing illness is the best way to get health-care costs down. So why aren’t governments doing more to protect the environment? We’ve long known that environmental factors contribute to disease, especially contamination of air, water, and soil. Scientists are now learning the connection is stronger than we realized.

New research shows that 60 per cent of emerging infectious diseases affecting humans — those that rapidly increase in incidence or geographic range — start with animals, two thirds from wild animals. Lyme disease, West Nile virus, Ebola, SARS, AIDS… these are just a few of the hundreds of epidemics that have spread from animals to people. A study by the International Livestock Research Institute concludes that more than two-million people a year are killed by diseases that originated with wild and domestic animals. Many more become ill.


Habitat destruction is the process in which natural habitat is rendered functionally unable to support the species present. In this process, the organisms that previously used the site are displaced or destroyed, reducing biodiversity.[1] Habitat destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industry production andurbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include miningloggingtrawling and urban sprawl. Habitat destruction is currently ranked as the primary cause of species extinction worldwide.[2] It is a process of natural environmental change that may be caused byhabitat fragmentation, geological processes, climate change[1] or by human activities such as the introduction of invasive species, ecosystem nutrient depletion, and other human activities mentioned below.

The terms “habitat loss” and “habitat reduction” are also used in a wider sense, including loss of habitat from other factors, such as water and noise pollution.

Tropical rainforests have received most of the attention concerning the destruction of habitat. From the approximately 16 million square kilometers of tropical rainforest habitat that originally existed worldwide, less than 9 million square kilometers remain today.[8] The current rate of deforestation is 160,000 square kilometers per year, which equates to a loss of approximately 1% of original forest habitat each year.[10]

Other forest ecosystems have suffered as much or more destruction as tropical rainforestsFarming and logging have severely disturbed at least 94% of temperate broadleaf forests; many old growth forest stands have lost more than 98% of their previous area because of human activities.[8] Tropical deciduous dry forests are easier to clear and burn and are more suitable for agriculture and cattle ranchingthan tropical rainforests; consequently, less than 0.1% of dry forests in Central America’s Pacific Coast and less than 8% in Madagascarremain from their original extents.

Habitat destruction caused by humans includes conversion of land to agricultureurban sprawlinfrastructure development, and other anthropogenic changes to the characteristics of land. Habitat degradation, fragmentation, and pollution are aspects of habitat destruction caused by humans that do not necessarily involve overt destruction of habitat, yet result in habitat collapse. Desertificationdeforestation, and coral reef degradation are specific types of habitat destruction for those areas (desertsforestscoral reefs).

Geist and Lambin (2002) assessed 152 case studies of net losses of tropical forest cover to determine any patterns in the proximate and underlying causes of tropical deforestation. Their results, yielded as percentages of the case studies in which each parameter was a significant factor, provide a quantitative prioritization of which proximate and underlying causes were the most significant. The proximate causes were clustered into broad categories of agricultural expansion (96%), infrastructure expansion (72%), and wood extraction (67%). Therefore, according to this study, forest conversion to agriculture is the main land use change responsible for tropical deforestation. The specific categories reveal further insight into the specific causes of tropical deforestation: transport extension (64%), commercial wood extraction (52%), permanent cultivation (48%), cattle ranching (46%), shifting (slash and burn) cultivation (41%), subsistence agriculture(40%), and fuel wood extraction for domestic use (28%). One result is that shifting cultivation is not the primary cause of deforestation in all world regions, while transport extension (including the construction of new roads) is the largest single proximate factor responsible for deforestation.[16]

Drivers

Nanjing Road in Shanghai

While the above-mentioned activities are the proximal or direct causes of habitat destruction in that they actually destroy habitat, this still does not identify why humans destroy habitat. The forces that cause humans to destroy habitat are known as drivers of habitat destruction.Demographic, economic, sociopolitical, scientific and technological, and cultural drivers all contribute to habitat destruction.[15]

Demographic drivers include the expanding human population; rate of population increase over time; spatial distribution of people in a given area (urban versus rural), ecosystem type, and country; and the combined effects of poverty, age, family planning, gender, and education status of people in certain areas.[15] Most of the exponential human population growth worldwide is occurring in or close tobiodiversity hotspots.[7] This may explain why human population density accounts for 87.9% of the variation in numbers of threatened species across 114 countries, providing indisputable evidence that people play the largest role in decreasing biodiversity.[17] The boom in human population and migration of people into such species-rich regions are making conservation efforts not only more urgent but also more likely to conflict with local human interests.[7] The high local population density in such areas is directly correlated to the poverty status of the local people, most of whom lacking an education and family planning.[16]

From the Geist and Lambin (2002) study described in the previous section, the underlying driving forces were prioritized as follows (with the percent of the 152 cases the factor played a significant role in): economic factors (81%), institutional or policy factors (78%), technological factors (70%), cultural or socio-political factors (66%), and demographic factors (61%). The main economic factors included commercialization and growth of timber markets (68%), which are driven by national and international demands; urban industrial growth (38%); low domestic costs for land, labor, fuel, and timber (32%); and increases in product prices mainly for cash crops (25%). Institutional and policy factors included formal pro-deforestation policies on land development (40%), economic growth including colonization and infrastructure improvement (34%), and subsidies for land-based activities (26%); property rights and land-tenure insecurity (44%); and policy failures such as corruption, lawlessness, or mismanagement (42%). The main technological factor was the poor application of technology in the wood industry (45%), which leads to wasteful logging practices. Within the broad category of cultural and sociopolitical factors are public attitudes and values (63%), individual/household behavior (53%), public unconcern toward forest environments (43%), missing basic values (36%), and unconcern by individuals (32%). Demographic factors were the in-migration of colonizing settlers into sparsely populated forest areas (38%) and growing population density — a result of the first factor — in those areas (25%).

There are also feedbacks and interactions among the proximate and underlying causes of deforestation that can amplify the process. Road construction has the largest feedback effect, because it interacts with—and leads to—the establishment of new settlements and more people, which causes a growth in wood (logging) and food markets.[16] Growth in these markets, in turn, progresses the commercialization of agriculture and logging industries. When these industries become commercialized, they must become more efficient by utilizing larger or more modern machinery that often are worse on the habitat than traditional farming and logging methods. Either way, more land is cleared more rapidly for commercial markets. This common feedback example manifests just how closely related the proximate and underlying causes are to each other.

The rapid expansion of the global human population is increasing the world’s food requirement substantially. Simple logic instructs that more people will require more food. In fact, as the world’s population increases dramatically, agricultural output will need to increase by at least 50%, over the next 30 years.[19] In the past, continually moving to new land and soils provided a boost in food production to appease the global food demand. That easy fix will no longer be available, however, as more than 98% of all land suitable for agriculture is already in use or degraded beyond repair.[20]

The impending global food crisis will be a major source of habitat destruction. Commercial farmers are going to become desperate to produce more food from the same amount of land, so they will use more fertilizers and less concern for the environment to meet the market demand. Others will seek out new land or will convert other land-uses to agriculture. Agricultural intensification will become widespread at the cost of the environment and its inhabitants. Species will be pushed out of their habitat either directly by habitat destruction or indirectly by fragmentation, degradation, or pollution. Any efforts to protect the world’s remaining natural habitat and biodiversity will compete directly with humans’ growing demand for natural resources, especially new agricultural lands.

Fluoride toxicity

The Food & Drug Administration now requires that all fluoride toothpastes sold in the United States bear the following poison warning: “WARNING: Keep out of reach of children under 6 years of age. If you accidentally swallow more than used for brushing, seek professional help or contact a poison control center immediately.” The FDA warning is necessary because […]

The Food & Drug Administration now requires that all fluoride toothpastes sold in the United States bear the following poison warning:

“WARNING: Keep out of reach of children under 6 years of age. If you accidentally swallow more than used for brushing, seek professional help or contact a poison control center immediately.”

The FDA warning is necessary because relatively small doses of fluoride can induce symptoms of acute fluoride toxicity (i.e., poisoning). Early symptoms of fluoride poisoning include gastrointestinal pain, nausea, vomiting, and headaches. The minimum dose that can produce these symptoms is estimated to be 0.1 to 0.3 mg/kg of fluoride (i.e., 0.1 to 0.3 milligrams of fluoride for every kilogram of bodyweight). A child weighing 10 kilograms, therefore, can suffer symptoms of acute toxicity by ingesting just 1 to 3 milligrams of fluoride in a single sitting.

The practice of water fluoridation has been controversial from day one. It was first introduced in the U.S. in the 1940s, when Grand Rapids, Mich. added fluoride to its public water supply in the wake of wide evidence that fluoride helps strengthen teeth and supports oral health. Many of us use toothpaste with fluoride in it for this purpose, and organizations like the American Dental Association and the International Dental Federation believe that drinking water with added fluoride can help our teeth in much the same way that toothpaste does. After the World Health Organization’s 1969 endorsement, countries throughout the world began fluoridating their drinking water.
However, in the 1970s through the1990s, some European countries reversed their stance. Countries like Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands and Finland discontinued fluoridation, while France never even started. The exact reasons for the policy change depend on who you ask.

In high concentrations, soluble fluoride salts are toxic and skin or eye contact with high concentrations of many fluoride salts is dangerous. Referring to a common salt of fluoride, sodium fluoride (NaF), the lethal dose for most adult humans is estimated at 5 to 10 g (which is equivalent to 32 to 64 mg/kg elemental fluoride/kg body weight).[1][2][3] Ingestion of fluoride can produce gastrointestinal discomfort at doses at least 15 to 20 times lower (0.2–0.3 mg/kg) than lethal doses.[4] Although helpful for dental health in low dosage, chronic exposure to fluoride in large amounts interferes with bone formation. In this way, the greatest examples of fluoride poisoning arise from fluoride-rich ground water

In India an estimated 60 million people have been poisoned by well water contaminated by excessive fluoride, which is dissolved from the granite rocks. The effects are particularly evident in the bone deformations of children. Similar or larger problems are anticipated in other countries including China, Uzbekistan, and Ethiopia.[5]

Historically, most cases of acute fluoride toxicity have followed accidental ingestion of sodium fluoride based insecticides or rodenticides.[9] Currently, in advanced countries, most cases of fluoride exposure are due to the ingestion of dental fluoride products.[10] Although exposure to these products does not often cause toxicity, in one study 30% of children exposed to fluoride dental products developed mild symptoms.[10] Other sources include glass-etching or chrome-cleaning agents likeammonium bifluoride or hydrofluoric acid,[11][12] industrial exposure to fluxes used to promote the flow of a molten metal on a solid surface, volcanic ejecta (for example, in cattle grazing after an 1845–1846 eruption of Hekla and the 1783–1784 flood basalt eruption of Laki), and metal cleaners. Malfunction of water fluoridation equipment has happened several times, including a notable incident in Alaska.

Children may experience gastrointestinal distress upon ingesting sufficient amounts of flavored toothpaste. Between 1990 and 1994, over 628 people, mostly children, were treated after ingesting too much fluoride-containing toothpaste. “While the outcomes were generally not serious,” gastrointestinal symptoms appear to be the most common problem reported

A meta analysis conducted on epidemiological studies conducted in China concluded that exposure to “high” levels of fluoride (variously defined) in childhood was associated with a reduction in IQ of about 7 points.[14][15] The authors of the meta analysis noted that this research is not applicable to the safety of artificial water fluoridation because the adverse effects on IQ was found with fluoride levels that were much higher than typically found in artificially fluoridated water.[16] The meta analysis has been criticized for failing to account for confounding factors. For example, in some of the studies fluoride exposure came from the burning of high fluoride content coal, and used a control group from an area in which wood was used as fuel.

Danish researcher Kaj Roholm published Fluorine Intoxication in 1937, which was praised in a 1938 review by dental researcher H. Trendley Dean as “probably the outstanding contribution to the literature of fluorine”.[31] Since that time, the fluoridation of public water has been widely implemented and has been hailed as one of the top medical achievements of the 20th Century.[32] The effects of fluoride-rich ground water became recognized in the 1990s.

a new tax

The Koch Attack on Solar Energy By THE EDITORIAL BOARD NYTimes APRIL 26, 2014 At long last, the Koch brothers and their conservative allies in state government have found a new tax they can support. Naturally it’s a tax on … Continue reading

The Koch Attack on Solar Energy

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
NYTimes
APRIL 26, 2014


Continuar leyendo “a new tax”

a new tax

The Koch Attack on Solar Energy By THE EDITORIAL BOARD NYTimes APRIL 26, 2014 At long last, the Koch brothers and their conservative allies in state government have found a new tax they can support. Naturally it’s a tax on … Continue reading

The Koch Attack on Solar Energy

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
NYTimes
APRIL 26, 2014


Continuar leyendo “a new tax”

Climate change blame and liability

I can sincerely say this is the most important petition we’ve ever done.
 
 
Sorry for the language, but one top scientist just warned that we are all “f*cked” if global warming releases gigantic amounts of methane gas from the arctic tundra. The UN knows this, and is bringing world leaders to New York for an emergency summit.
 
 
Hundreds of thousands of us will take to the streets for the People’s Climate March just before the summit. Let’s make sure that on that day we deliver the largest Avaaz petition ever, for the only solution: mobilize the world to shift to 100% clean energy. Add your voice, and forward this widely:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/100_clean_78/?bnJLaib&v=44756

Whether it’s the ‘arctic methane bomb’, the rapid acidification of our oceans, or apocalyptic flooding, climate change is the biggest threat humanity is facing, and we need the biggest petition ever to meet it. The number of us who sign will be read out to all leaders at the summit, published in hundreds of media articles, and be delivered by our marches worldwide.
 
 
100% clean energy is a realistic goal. Already, 20% of the world’s electricity comes from clean energy, and solar power is cheaper than coal in many countries! We just need to get our leaders to agree to put our foot on the accelerator.
We’re gearing up for the largest climate mobilization in history on September 21. Already hundreds of events are organised and hundreds of thousands of people signed up. But the events are designed to deliver our petition to decision makers. Let’s make it the largest call to action ever. Join now and tell everyone:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/100_clean_78/?bnJLaib&v=44756

We’re all different, and beautifully diverse. But whoever and wherever we are, climate change threatens everything we love, and brings all of us together. Let’s come together now.
 
 
With hope,

Ricken, Danny, Lisa, Judy, Alex, Iain, and the rest of the Avaaz team
PS – Every signature really does count! Add your voice here: https://secure.avaaz.org/en/100_clean_78/?bnJLaib&v=44756 

MORE INFORMATION: 

Climate scientist drops the F-bomb (Salon)
http://www.salon.com/2014/08/06/climate_scientist_drops_the_f_bomb_after_startling_arctic_discovery/

EU to beat 2020 climate targets, split over 2030 ones (Reuters)
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/05/14/eu-carbon-idUKL6N0O06BG20140514 

The most influential climate change paper today remains unknown to most people (Inside Climate News)
http://insideclimatenews.org/news/20140213/climate-change-science-carbon-budget-nature-global-warming-2-degrees-bill-mckibben-fossil-fuels-keystone-xl-oil?page=show



Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Newly leaked documents have revealed how U.S. negotiators at the U.N. climate summit in Warsaw are opposing efforts to help developing countries adapt to climate change. According to an internal U.S. briefing memo seen by Democracy Now!, the U.S. delegation is worried the talks in Warsaw will “focus increasingly on blame and liability” and that poor nations will be “seeking redress for climate damages from sea level rise, droughts, powerful storms and other adverse impacts.”


Environmental Defense Fund
1875 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 600,
Washington, DC 20009
(800) 684-3322

The images brought tears to my eyes. A chill fell over me, and goosebumps raised along my arms. I stared at the video footage in disbelief, and was suddenly so grateful that each of my family members—all in my beloved home state of New Jersey or in New York City—were safe. They were living without power or heat, but they were luckier than so many others.

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, my work—and the work of my EDF colleagues—has never felt so personally meaningful.

And it’s never been more clear: climate change is increasing the devastating effects of extreme weather—and it is time to do something about it.

The EPA is stepping up, and has proposed a groundbreaking new proposal that would—for the first time ever—nationally limit carbon pollution from new power plants. This is a historic first step in the President’s Climate Action Plan, and could be America’s first national effort at fighting back against climate change.

And you have a chance to be a part of it, to raise your voice, and to stand strong in favor of climate action.

Not just for my home—but for yours, and for everyone who has watched the places and people they love fall victim to these new, more powerful storms.

Because I’m not the only one with an extreme weather story. From devastating droughts to disastrous wildfires and calamitous floods, extreme weather is affecting more than just the East Coast. With one click, you can do something about it.

Take Action: Support EPA’s national limits on carbon pollution from new power plants.

I can sincerely say this is the most important petition we’ve ever done.
 
 
Sorry for the language, but one top scientist just warned that we are all “f*cked” if global warming releases gigantic amounts of methane gas from the arctic tundra. The UN knows this, and is bringing world leaders to New York for an emergency summit.
 
 
Hundreds of thousands of us will take to the streets for the People’s Climate March just before the summit. Let’s make sure that on that day we deliver the largest Avaaz petition ever, for the only solution: mobilize the world to shift to 100% clean energy. Add your voice, and forward this widely:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/100_clean_78/?bnJLaib&v=44756

Whether it’s the ‘arctic methane bomb’, the rapid acidification of our oceans, or apocalyptic flooding, climate change is the biggest threat humanity is facing, and we need the biggest petition ever to meet it. The number of us who sign will be read out to all leaders at the summit, published in hundreds of media articles, and be delivered by our marches worldwide.
 
 
100% clean energy is a realistic goal. Already, 20% of the world’s electricity comes from clean energy, and solar power is cheaper than coal in many countries! We just need to get our leaders to agree to put our foot on the accelerator.
We’re gearing up for the largest climate mobilization in history on September 21. Already hundreds of events are organised and hundreds of thousands of people signed up. But the events are designed to deliver our petition to decision makers. Let’s make it the largest call to action ever. Join now and tell everyone:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/100_clean_78/?bnJLaib&v=44756

We’re all different, and beautifully diverse. But whoever and wherever we are, climate change threatens everything we love, and brings all of us together. Let’s come together now.
 
 
With hope,

Ricken, Danny, Lisa, Judy, Alex, Iain, and the rest of the Avaaz team
PS – Every signature really does count! Add your voice here: https://secure.avaaz.org/en/100_clean_78/?bnJLaib&v=44756 


MORE INFORMATION: 

Climate scientist drops the F-bomb (Salon)
http://www.salon.com/2014/08/06/climate_scientist_drops_the_f_bomb_after_startling_arctic_discovery/

EU to beat 2020 climate targets, split over 2030 ones (Reuters)
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/05/14/eu-carbon-idUKL6N0O06BG20140514 

The most influential climate change paper today remains unknown to most people (Inside Climate News)
http://insideclimatenews.org/news/20140213/climate-change-science-carbon-budget-nature-global-warming-2-degrees-bill-mckibben-fossil-fuels-keystone-xl-oil?page=show



Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Newly leaked documents have revealed how U.S. negotiators at the U.N. climate summit in Warsaw are opposing efforts to help developing countries adapt to climate change. According to an internal U.S. briefing memo seen by Democracy Now!, the U.S. delegation is worried the talks in Warsaw will “focus increasingly on blame and liability” and that poor nations will be “seeking redress for climate damages from sea level rise, droughts, powerful storms and other adverse impacts.”


Environmental Defense Fund
1875 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 600,
Washington, DC 20009
(800) 684-3322

The images brought tears to my eyes. A chill fell over me, and goosebumps raised along my arms. I stared at the video footage in disbelief, and was suddenly so grateful that each of my family members—all in my beloved home state of New Jersey or in New York City—were safe. They were living without power or heat, but they were luckier than so many others.

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, my work—and the work of my EDF colleagues—has never felt so personally meaningful.

And it’s never been more clear: climate change is increasing the devastating effects of extreme weather—and it is time to do something about it.

The EPA is stepping up, and has proposed a groundbreaking new proposal that would—for the first time ever—nationally limit carbon pollution from new power plants. This is a historic first step in the President’s Climate Action Plan, and could be America’s first national effort at fighting back against climate change.

And you have a chance to be a part of it, to raise your voice, and to stand strong in favor of climate action.

Not just for my home—but for yours, and for everyone who has watched the places and people they love fall victim to these new, more powerful storms.

Because I’m not the only one with an extreme weather story. From devastating droughts to disastrous wildfires and calamitous floods, extreme weather is affecting more than just the East Coast. With one click, you can do something about it.

Take Action: Support EPA’s national limits on carbon pollution from new power plants.