Pen and Ink Cross Hatching Masters Edition

Published on Mar 7, 2013
In the long-awaited sequel to Pen and Ink Crosshatching master illustrator Dan Nelson describes and demonstrates his refined cross-hatching technique.

Published on Mar 7, 2013
In the long-awaited sequel to Pen and Ink Crosshatching master illustrator Dan Nelson describes and demonstrates his refined cross-hatching technique.

ink

Uploaded on Dec 9, 2011 Portrait ‘Ink and Water’ (speed painting) offers a glance at my artistic vision—it is my first artwork featured on Youtube. I’m playing with ink by dropping it on some wet surfaces of the paper (size … Continue reading


Uploaded on Dec 9, 2011
Portrait ‘Ink and Water’ (speed painting) offers a glance at my artistic vision—it is my first artwork featured on Youtube. I’m playing with ink by dropping it on some wet surfaces of the paper (size A4) in order to create a lasting visual impression.

I’m a French contemporary artist (drawer, painter and illustrator) and I’m glad to offer a glance at my artistic vision. This particular artwork is probably in the vein of contemporary pop art and pop artists. I’m often asked whether I use watercolor but with this type of paintings, ink is by far the best material.

ART SUPPLIES
– Pentel Waterbrush Pens : fine, medium and broad tip.
– Regular Black India Ink, from “Pébéo”
– Watercolor paper called “Centenaire”

List of materials:

Round brushes n. 2 and n.10
Blue and red Chinese ink
Green watercolour (I didn’t have green Chinese ink, so used this).
Fabriano white watercolor paper, fine grain
Yellow cardboard paper
dropper

The Calling of Saint Matthew

The Calling of Saint Matthew is a masterpiece by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, depicting the moment at which Jesus Christ inspires Matthew to follow him. It was completed in 1599-1600 for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of the French … Continue reading

CaravaggioContarelli

The Calling of Saint Matthew is a masterpiece by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, depicting the moment at which Jesus Christ inspires Matthew to follow him. It was completed in 1599-1600 for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of the French congregation, San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome, where it remains today. It hangs alongside two other paintings of Matthew by Caravaggio, The Martyrdom of Saint Matthew (painted around the same time as the Calling) and The Inspiration of Saint Matthew (1602).

The painting depicts the story from the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 9:9): “Jesus saw a man named Matthew at his seat in the custom house, and said to him, “Follow me”, and Matthew rose and followed Him.” Caravaggio depicts Matthew the tax collector sitting at a table with four other men. Jesus Christ and Saint Peter have entered the room, and Jesus is pointing at Matthew. A beam of light illuminates the faces of the men at the table who are looking at Christ.

There is some debate over which man in the picture is Saint Matthew, as the surprised gesture of the bearded man at the table can be read in two ways.

Most writers on the Calling assume Saint Matthew to be the bearded man, and see him to be pointing at himself, as if to ask “Me?” in response to Christ’s summons. This theory is strengthened when one takes into consideration the other two works in this series, The Inspiration of Saint Matthew, and the The Martyrdom of Saint Matthew. The bearded man who models as Saint Matthew appears in all three works, with him unequivocally playing the role of Saint Matthew in both the Inspiration and the Martyrdom. It is also possible that the bearded Saint Matthew is pointing to the younger man whose head is slumped, unsure if Christ is summoning him or the younger man, the latter of which is not looking in the direction of Christ.

A more recent interpretation proposes that the bearded man is in fact pointing at the young man at the end of the table, whose head is slumped. In this reading, the bearded man is asking “Him?” in response to Christ’s summons, and the painting is depicting the moment immediately before a young Matthew raises his head to see Christ. Other writers describe the painting as deliberately ambiguous.[2]

475px-Caravaggio_MatthewAndTheAngel_byMikeyAngels

Pope Francis has said that he often went to San Luigi as a young man to contemplate the painting. Referring both to Christ’s outstretched arm and Matthew’s response, Francis said, “This is me, a sinner on whom the Lord has turned his gaze.”[3]

Michelangelo_Caravaggio_047

Chinese painting

Chinese painting is one of the oldest continuous artistic traditions in the world. The earliest paintings were not representational but ornamental; they consisted of patterns or designs rather than pictures. Early pottery was painted with spirals, zigzags, dots, or animals. … Continue reading

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Chinese painting is one of the oldest continuous artistic traditions in the world. The earliest paintings were not representational but ornamental; they consisted of patterns or designs rather than pictures. Early pottery was painted with spirals, zigzags, dots, or animals. It was only during the Warring States Period (403-221 BC) that artists began to represent the world around them.

Painting in the traditional style is known today in Chinese as guó huà (??), meaning ‘national’ or ‘native painting’, as opposed to Western styles of art which became popular in China in the 20th century. Traditional painting involves essentially the same techniques as calligraphy and is done with a brush dipped in black or colored ink; oils are not used. As with calligraphy, the most popular materials on which paintings are made of are paper and silk. The finished work can be mounted on scrolls, such as hanging scrolls or handscrolls. Traditional painting can also be done on album sheets, walls, lacquerware, folding screens, and other media.

The two main techniques in Chinese painting are:

  • Meticulous – Gong-bi (??) often referred to as “court-style” painting
  • Freehand – Shui-mo (??) loosely termed watercolour or brush painting. The Chinese character “mo” means ink and “shui” means water. This style is also referred to as “xie yi” (??) or freehand style.

Artists from the Han (202 BC) to the Tang (618–906) dynasties mainly painted the human figure. Much of what we know of early Chinese figure painting comes from burial sites, where paintings were preserved on silk banners, lacquered objects, and tomb walls. Many early tomb paintings were meant to protect the dead or help their souls get to paradise. Others illustrated the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius, or showed scenes of daily life.

Many critics consider landscape to be the highest form of Chinese painting. The time from the Five Dynasties period to the Northern Song period (907–1127) is known as the “Great age of Chinese landscape”. In the north, artists such as Jing Hao, Fan Kuan, and Guo Xi painted pictures of towering mountains, using strong black lines, ink wash, and sharp, dotted brushstrokes to suggest rough stone. In the south, Dong Yuan, Juran, and other artists painted the rolling hills and rivers of their native countryside in peaceful scenes done with softer, rubbed brushwork. These two kinds of scenes and techniques became the classical styles of Chinese landscape painting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_painting