Epistemology

Faith is believing what you know ain’t so Mark Twain The difference between garbage and raw materials is that garbage is a motley mix while raw materials are collated. That is, if one keeps left overs and scrap in separated bins of aluminium cans, paper, organic waste, and so on, then they are no longer […]

Faith is believing what you know ain’t so

Mark Twain

The difference between garbage and raw materials is that garbage is a motley mix while raw materials are collated. That is, if one keeps left overs and scrap in separated bins of aluminium cans, paper, organic waste, and so on, then they are no longer waste but materials available for some useful purpose. However, it is not enough to collate the waste, we must have an use for the different materials or we then just have clutter.

An analogue relation exist between data and information. If data is to be useful information, it must be collated, processed, and delivered to the appropriate decision maker in time and form.

A related concept is knowledge. I cannot articulate with precision what is knowledge but it is related to the ability to act appropriately. The management of knowledge.is a key challenge for organizations. Most of what experts know is not even conscious and cannot be articulated. The experts do not really know how they do what they do. At the brain level most skills are encoded in the basal ganglia and not in the thinking parts of the brain. It is a set of experiences and patterns that are acquired by doing or executing the skill. Individual knowledge becomes for better or worst institutional knowledge trough tradition and apprenticeships.

Published on Jun 3, 2013

UNANSWERED QUESTIONS MEGA-COLLAB:http://youtu.be/UFydagCS9fg

Follow me: http://www.twitter.com/tweetsauce

LINKS/SOURCES:

music by: http://www.youtube.com/user/jakechudnow/

song at end: “Pious Reflection” by Paul Mottram downloaded fromhttp://www.audionetwork.com/
it’s on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kszd5…

Human senses:

http://science.howstuffworks.com/life…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sense

Color illusion: http://loriputnampaints.blogspot.com….

Audio illusion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9VMf…

temperature illusion: http://exs.exploratorium.edu/exhibits…

Tactile illusions: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tactile_…

epistemology wiki pages:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epistomo…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_o…

proof:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proof_(…)
http://thesaurus.com/browse/proof

a priori truth [pdf]: http://consequently.org/papers/aprior…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_priori…)

rotating brain gif: http://lcni.uoregon.edu/~dow/Space_so…

neuroscience of memory:

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/309…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroana…
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/12…
http://www.brainfacts.org/sensing-thi…

LTP:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwp5sf…
http://www.expertsmind.com/topic/neur…

engrams: http://brainsandcognition.wordpress.c…

storage of human brain: http://www.scientificamerican.com/art…

SKYentists: https://twitter.com/nice_mustard/stat…

philosophy of science:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Construc…

The Matrix defense:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/idea…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Matr…

solipsism:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solipsism
http://philosophynow.org/issues/57/Ho…
http://onlinephilosophyclub.com/forum…

Martin Gardner books:

http://bit.ly/19CvvoG
http://amzn.to/Zou74W

why cats like keyboards: http://kotaku.com/5991046/why-cats-lo…

Published on Jul 2, 2013

FOLLOW MICHAEL STEVENS: http://www.Twitter.com/tweetsauce
SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/POIaN7
SOURCES & more creepy stuff below:

John Bergeron’s SINGING ANDROIDS [videos]:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLy-Aw…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zFl_W…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-9v7a…
website: http://www.androidworld.com/prod68.htm

SHAYE ST. John [videos]:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzobV_…
http://www.youtube.com/user/ShayeSain…

“Die in a week” image from MarbleHornets:http://www.youtube.com/user/MarbleHor…

Nightmare-fuel image collections:

http://creepypasta.wikia.com/wiki/Nig…)
http://imgur.com/a/zpxZj?gallery
http://imgur.com/a/fcz3G

dot jpg?? http://i.imgur.com/82taS.jpg

scared of heights? don’t watch this: http://bit.ly/h29PLp

More info about “The Hands Resist Him” painting:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hand…

Creepypasta (unnerving stories):http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creepypasta

aphobia: people who don’t feel fear:http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/b…

sad, terrifying study on learning fear (Little Albert Experiment):http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_A…

scariest things: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear#Com…

fear processing in brain: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_pro…

Stephen King on types of scary stuff:http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/84666…

Claude Levi Strauss on masks and why CLOWNS ARE SCARY:http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/a…

Uncanny Valley:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncanny_…
http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/11/health/…

image metrics video: http://www.awntv.com/videos/image-met…

paper on “creepiness”: http://academia.edu/2465121/Creepiness

famous Cognitive Dissonace study on behavior [with video]:http://www.simplypsychology.org/cogni…

High Place Phenomenon study:http://www.nbcnews.com/health/weird-u…

HPP paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22…

terrible and terrific etymology (it’s called “amelioration”):http://english.stackexchange.com/ques…

Laurie Lipton does GREAT creepy drawings:http://www.laurielipton.com/drawings/

creepy people LITERALLY give you chills:http://www.scientificamerican.com/pod…

creepy things kids say: http://www.uncommon-parenting.com/201…

these are scary: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcas…

creepy subreddits (some may be nsfw):

http://www.reddit.com/r/creepy/
http://www.reddit.com/r/creepygifs
http://www.reddit.com/r/unnerving
http://www.reddit.com/r/FearMe/
http://www.reddit.com/r/scaredshitless
http://www.reddit.com/r/shortscarysto…

what I listened to while researching this episode (playlist):http://bit.ly/13pvoMb

***************

music by
http://www.YouTube.com/JakeChudnow
trip hop and ‘spooky’ music from http://www.audionetwork.com

Published on Dec 9, 2013

Michael Stevens the persona behind the YouTube sensation Vsauce, is an online personality with an entertaining approach to explaining the science behind seemingly ordinary, everyday phenomena. Michael’s videos have been watched over 400 million times and Vsauce’s 4.5 million subscribers continues to add an astonishing 15 thousand subscribers each day. Michael lives in London where he works for Google as an in-house consultant for other creators on the platform.
YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/Vsauce/

http://www.tedxvienna.at/
http://www.facebook.com/tedxvienna

November 2, 2013 at Volkstheater Wien, Vienna, Austria.


Lies, damned lies, and statistics

“Lies, damned lies, and statistics” is a phrase describing the persuasive power of numbers, particularly the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments. It is also sometimes colloquially used to doubt statistics used to prove an opponent’s point. The term was popularised in the United States by Mark Twain (among others), who attributed it to the 19th-century British Prime Minister Benjamin […]

Lies, damned lies, and statistics” is a phrase describing the persuasive power of numbers, particularly the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments. It is also sometimes colloquially used to doubt statistics used to prove an opponent’s point.

The term was popularised in the United States by Mark Twain (among others), who attributed it to the 19th-century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881): “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” However, the phrase is not found in any of Disraeli’s works and the earliest known appearances were years after his death. Other coiners have therefore been proposed, and the phrase is often attributed to Twain himself.

History

Mark Twain popularized the saying in “Chapters from My Autobiography”, published in the North American Review in 1906. “Figures often beguile me,” he wrote, “particularly when I have the arranging of them myself; in which case the remark attributed to Disraeli would often apply with justice and force: ‘There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.’”[1]

Alternative attributions include, among many others (for example Walter Bagehot and Arthur James Balfour) the radical English journalist and politician Henry Du Pré Labouchère(1831–1912), and British politician and man of letters Leonard H. Courtney, who used the phrase in 1895 and two years later became president of the Royal Statistical Society.[2]Courtney referred to a future statesman, not a past one.[3]

The earliest instance of the phrase found in print dates to a letter written in the British newspaper National Observer on June 8, 1891, published June 13, 1891, p. 93(-94): NATIONAL PENSIONS [To the Editor of The National Observer] London, 8 June 1891 “Sir,–It has been wittily remarked that there are three kinds of falsehood: the first is a ‘fib,’ the second is a downright lie, and the third and most aggravated is statistics. It is on statistics and on the absence of statistics that the advocate of national pensions relies…..” Later, in October 1891, as a query in Notes and Queries, the pseudonymous questioner, signing as “St Swithin”, asked for the originator of the phrase, indicating common usage even at that date.[3] The pseudonym has been attributed to Eliza Gutch.[4]

The American Dialect Society list archives includes numerous posts by Stephen Goranson that cite research into uses soon after the above. . They include:

  • Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke (1843–1911) is reported twice in October 1891 to have used the phrase, without attributing it to others:
“Sir Charles Dilke [1843-1911] was saying the other day that false statements might be arranged according to their degree under three heads, fibs, lies, and statistics.” The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, Monday, October 19, 1891
The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), October 21, 1891; Issue 9223 “Sir Charles Dilke and the Bishops” “A mass meeting of the slate quarry-men of Festiniog [Ffestiniog, Wales] was held Wednesday night [Oct. 14] to protest against certain dismissals from one of the quarries….” He [Dilke] observed that the speeches of the Bishops on the disestablishment question reminded him that there were three degrees of untruth–a fib, a lie, and statistics (Laughter)”
  • The phrase, as noted by Robert Giffen in 1892, was a variation on a phrase about three types of unreliable witnesses, a liar, a damned liar, and an expert (Economic Journal 2 (6) (1892), 209-238, first paragraph; the paper was previously read at a meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science at Hobart in January 1892). 1892 Jan talk, June pub Robert Giffen (1837–1910, Walter Bagehot’s assistant editor at The Economist 1868ff; 1882-4 President of the Statistical Society): “An old jest runs to the effect that there are three degrees of comparison among liars. There are liars, there are outrageous liars, and there are scientific experts. This has lately been adapted to throw dirt upon statistics. There are three degrees of comparison, it is said, in lying. There are lies, there are outrageous lies, and there are statistics.”
  • That phrase can be found in Nature in 1885, page 74 November 26, 1885: :”A well-known lawyer, now a judge, once grouped witnesses into three classes: simple liars, damned liars, and experts. He did not mean that the expert …”
  • A minute of the X Club meeting held on 5 December 1885, recorded by Thomas Henry Huxley, noted “Talked politics, scandal, and the three classes of witnesses—liars, d—d liars, and experts.” Quoted in 1900 in Leonard Huxley‘s The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley.[5][6]

¿Grok es una palabra en ingles o en marciano?

El genero de ciencia-ficción o de fantasía es un medio utilizado para satirizar el entorno social mediante construcciones alegóricas. Por ejemplo, Un yanqui en la corte del rey Arturo [Connnecticut Yankee in King Arthur Court (El Libro De Bolsillo) (Spanish Edition)] de Mark Twain que no tiene nada que ver con el viaje en el tiempo, sino con actitudes humanas y convenciones sociales.

Al termino de la Segunda Guerra Mundial alegorías fantásticas fueron usadas por George Orwell en Animal Farm y 1984 como un subterfugio para sacarle la vuelta a la censura y hacer una critica del régimen totalitario Estalinista y la tendencia general de los gobiernos a la manipulación propagandística y la supresión de actitudes criticas en la población.
La alegoría del extranjero universal, uno de los temas centrales de la ciencia ficción, permite al autor cuestionar supuestos fundamentales, y por lo tanto invisibles, de la convención social. Es interesante como se introducen palabras nuevas para conceptos viejos, como Grok en Stranger in a Strange Land de Robert A. Heinlein.

Referencias

Technorati Tags: ,,,,,,,,,

El genero de ciencia-ficción o de fantasía es un medio utilizado para satirizar el entorno social mediante construcciones alegóricas. Por ejemplo, Un yanqui en la corte del rey Arturo [Connnecticut Yankee in King Arthur Court (El Libro De Bolsillo) (Spanish Edition)] de Mark Twain que no tiene nada que ver con el viaje en el tiempo, sino con actitudes humanas y convenciones sociales.



Al termino de la Segunda Guerra Mundial alegorías fantásticas fueron usadas por George Orwell en Animal Farm y 1984 como un subterfugio para sacarle la vuelta a la censura y hacer una critica del régimen totalitario Estalinista y la tendencia general de los gobiernos a la manipulación propagandística y la supresión de actitudes criticas en la población.

La alegoría del extranjero universal, uno de los temas centrales de la ciencia ficción, permite al autor cuestionar supuestos fundamentales, y por lo tanto invisibles, de la convención social. Es interesante como se introducen palabras nuevas para conceptos viejos, como Grok en Stranger in a Strange Land de Robert A. Heinlein.

Referencias

Technorati Tags: ,,,,,,,,,

Fool me once

Who said ‘You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time but you cannot fool all the people all the time’? It is commonly attributed to Abraham Lincoln, but there appears … Continue reading

Who said

‘You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time but you cannot fool all the people all the time’?

It is commonly attributed to Abraham Lincoln, but there appears to be no hard evidence that he actually said it. It has also been attributed to P. T. Barnum (of the world famous Ringling Bros. Barnum and Bailey Circus), poet John Lydgate and Mark Twain.
There is also a variant (sometimes claimed to be the original form):

“You can please some of the people all of the time, you can please all of the people some of the time, but you can’t please all of the people all of the time.”

However, Alexander McClure attributes the quote to Lincoln in his 1901 book Lincoln’s Own Yarns and Stories. McClure (1828-1909) was a personal friend of Lincoln and was appointed Asst Adjutant General by Lincoln. He also worked on Lincolns 1860 election.


¿Grok es una palabra en ingles o en marciano?

El genero de ciencia-ficción o de fantasía es un medio utilizado para satirizar el entorno social mediante construcciones alegóricas. Por ejemplo, Un yanqui en la corte del rey Arturo [Connnecticut Yankee in King Arthur Court (El Libro De Bolsillo) …

El genero de ciencia-ficción o de fantasía es un medio utilizado para satirizar el entorno social mediante construcciones alegóricas. Por ejemplo, Un yanqui en la corte del rey Arturo [Connnecticut Yankee in King Arthur Court (El Libro De Bolsillo) (Spanish Edition)] de Mark Twain que no tiene nada que ver con el viaje en el tiempo, sino con actitudes humanas y convenciones sociales.



Al termino de la Segunda Guerra Mundial alegorías fantásticas fueron usadas por George Orwell en Animal Farm y 1984 como un subterfugio para sacarle la vuelta a la censura y hacer una critica del régimen totalitario Estalinista y la tendencia general de los gobiernos a la manipulación propagandística y la supresión de actitudes criticas en la población.

La alegoría del extranjero universal, uno de los temas centrales de la ciencia ficción, permite al autor cuestionar supuestos fundamentales, y por lo tanto invisibles, de la convención social. Es interesante como se introducen palabras nuevas para conceptos viejos, como Grok en Stranger in a Strange Land de Robert A. Heinlein.

Referencias

Technorati Tags: ,,,,,,,,,