Unconscious Decision Making

Published on Jul 26, 2012 Instinct is the driving force behind human decision making. Irrationality must be recognized if we’re going to get beyond the risks of not being built as thinking machines, says David Ropeik. David P. Ropeik is … Continue reading

Published on Jul 26, 2012 Instinct is the driving force behind human decision making. Irrationality must be recognized if we’re going to get beyond the risks of not being built as thinking machines, says David Ropeik. David P. Ropeik is an international consultant, author, teacher, and speaker on risk perception and risk communication.[1] He is also creator and director of Improving Media Coverage of Risk, a training program for journalists. He is a regular contributor to Big Think,[2] Psychology Today,[3] Cognoscenti,[4] and the Huffington Post.[5] http://bigthink.com


Published on Nov 26, 2012 Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University. Dr. Robert Cialdini & Steve Martin are co-authors (together with Dr. Noah Goldstein) of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Business Week International Bestseller Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to be Persuasive. US Amazon http://tinyurl.com/afbam9g UK Amazon http://tinyurl.com/adxrp6c IAW USA: http://www.influenceatwork.com IAW UK: http://www.influenceatwork.co.uk/


Nobel Prize winning neuropsychiatrist Eric Kandel describes new research which hints at the possibility of a biological basis to the unconscious mind. Directed / Produced by Elizabeth Rodd and Jonathan Fowler

Eric Richard Kandel (born November 7, 1929) is an American neuropsychiatrist. He was a recipient of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on the physiological basis of memory storage in neurons. He shared the prize with Arvid Carlsson and Paul Greengard.

Kandel, who had studied psychoanalysis, wanted to understand how memory works. His mentor, Harry Grundfest, said, “If you want to understand the brain you’re going to have to take a reductionist approach, one cell at a time.” So Kandel studied the neural system of the sea slug Aplysia californica, which has large nerve cells amenable to experimental manipulation and is a member of the simplest group of animals known to be capable of learning.[1]

Starting in 1966 James Schwartz collaborated with Kandel on a biochemical analysis of changes in neurons associated with learning and memory storage. By this time it was known that long-term memory, unlike short-term memory, involved the synthesis of new proteins. By 1972 they had evidence that the second messenger molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) was produced in Aplysia ganglia under conditions that cause short-term memory formation (sensitization). In 1974 Kandel moved his lab moved to Columbia University and became founding director of the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior. It was soon found that the neurotransmitter serotonin, acting to produce the second messenger cAMP, is involved in the molecular basis of sensitization of the gill-withdrawal reflex. By 1980, collaboration with Paul Greengard resulted in demonstration that cAMP-dependent protein kinase, also known as protein kinase A (PKA), acted in this biochemical pathway in response to elevated levels of cAMP. Steven Siegelbaum identified a potassium channel that could be regulated by PKA, coupling serotonin’s effects to altered synaptic electrophysiology. In 1983 Kandel helped form the Howard Hughes Medical Research Institute at Columbia devoted to molecular neural science. The Kandel lab then sought to identify proteins that had to be synthesized to convert short-term memories into long-lasting memories. One of the nuclear targets for PKA is the transcriptional control protein CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). In collaboration with David Glanzman and Craig Bailey, Kandel identified CREB as being a protein involved in long-term memory storage. One result of CREB activation is an increase in the number of synaptic connections. Thus, short-term memory had been linked to functional changes in existing synapses, while long-term memory was associated with a change in the number of synaptic connections. Some of the synaptic changes observed by Kandel’s laboratory provide examples of Hebbian learning. One article describes the role of Hebbian learning in the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex.[4] The Kandel lab has also performed important experiments using transgenic mice as a system for investigating the molecular basis of memory storage in the vertebrate hippocampus.[5][6][7] Kandel’s original idea that learning mechanisms would be conserved between all animals has been confirmed. Neurotransmitters, second messenger systems, protein kinasesion channels, and transcription factors like CREB have been confirmed to function in both vertebrate and invertebrate learning and memory storage.[8][9]

Kandel is a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. He is a Senior Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He was also the founding director of the Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, which is now the Department of Neuroscience at Columbia University. Kandel’s popularized account chronicling his life and research, In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind,[2] was awarded the 2006 Los Angeles Times Book Awardfor Science and Technology.


Learn every gesture and body language cue in one video. Eye, hand, leg, arm, and mouth gestures are completely covered. Gestures and Body Language Series Be an expert in body language. Applies to his and her body language. Article is here http://bit.ly/apSipQ


Energy balances in Saudi Arabia

Milk consumption in Saudi Arabia reached 729.4 million litres in 2012 … The Kingdom has already depleted 70% of these sources of water and must now turn increasingly to desalinisation which when factored into the cost of producing fresh milk … Continue reading

Milk consumption in Saudi Arabia reached 729.4 million litres in 2012

The Kingdom has already depleted 70% of these sources of water and must now turn increasingly to desalinisation which when factored into the cost of producing fresh milk is very expensive. Experts have estimated that it takes between 500- 1000 litres of fresh water to produce 1 litre of fresh milk if one takes into around the irrigation required to grow the Rhodes grass or Alfalfa required to feed the cows.

Of Milk Cows and Saudi Arabia

Posted by JoulesBurn on September 10, 2013 – 9:59am
Topic: Supply/Production
Tags: aramco, ghawar, saudi arabia [list all tags]

Under the desert in eastern Saudi Arabia lies Ghawar, the largest oil field in the world. It has been famously productive, with a per-well flow rate of thousands of barrels per day, owing to a combination of efficient water injection, good rock permeability, and other factors. At its best, it set the standard for easy oil. The first wells were drilled with rather rudimentary equipment hauled across the desert sands, and the oil would flow out at ten thousand barrels per day. It was, in a sense, a giant udder. And the world milked it hard for awhile.
However, this article isn’t just about a metaphor; it is also about cows, the Holsteins of Haradh. But in the end, I will circle back to the present and future of Saudi oil production.


Irrationality

Dan Ariely Uncovers the Truth About Dishonesty from The RSA on FORA.tv Uploaded on Jan 13, 2009 Dan Ariely, a professor of behavioral economics at Duke University, presents examples of cognitive illusions that help illustrate why humans make predictably irrational decisions. EG is the celebration of the American entertainment industry. Since 1984, Richard Saul Wurman […]

Dan Ariely Uncovers the Truth About Dishonesty from The RSA on FORA.tv

Uploaded on Jan 13, 2009
Dan Ariely, a professor of behavioral economics at Duke University, presents examples of cognitive illusions that help illustrate why humans make predictably irrational decisions.

EG is the celebration of the American entertainment industry. Since 1984, Richard Saul Wurman has created extraordinary gatherings about learning and understanding. EG is a rich extension of these ideas – a conference that explores the attitude of understanding in music, film, television, radio, technology, advertising, gaming, interactivity and the web – The Entertainment Gathering

Dan Ariely is the Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Behavioral Economics at MIT Sloan School of Management. He also holds an appointment at the MIT Media Lab where he is the head of the eRationality research group. He is considered to be one of the leading behavioral economists. Currently, Ariely is serving as a Visiting Professor at the Duke University, Fuqua School of Business where he is teaching a course based upon his findings in Predictably Irrational.

Ariely was an undergraduate at Tel Aviv University and received a Ph.D. and M.A. in cognitive psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Ph.D. in business from Duke University. His research focuses on discovering and measuring how people make decisions. He models the human decision making process and in particular the irrational decisions that we all make every day.

Ariely is the author of the book, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions, which was published on February 21, 2008 by HarperCollins.


[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDAzsZLvfPw&w=560&h=315]

Published on Jul 26, 2012
Instinct is the driving force behind human decision making. Irrationality must be recognized if we’re going to get beyond the risks of not being built as thinking machines, says David Ropeik.

Ropeik an Instructor at Harvard, a consultant in risk perception and risk communication, author of How Risky Is it, Really? Why Our Fears Don’t Always Match the Facts, and principal co-author of RISK, A Practical Guide for Deciding What’s Really Safe and What’s Really Dangerous in the World Around You.

http://bigthink.com


[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFdCzN7RYbw?list=UU8IMseLCZx2BZe3thxHXnog&hl=en_US&w=560&h=315]

Published on Nov 26, 2012
Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University.

Dr. Robert Cialdini & Steve Martin are co-authors (together with Dr. Noah Goldstein) of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Business Week International Bestseller Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to be Persuasive.

US Amazon http://tinyurl.com/afbam9g
UK Amazon http://tinyurl.com/adxrp6c

IAW USA: www.influenceatwork.com
IAW UK: www.influenceatwork.co.uk/


[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph7LcupAENw&w=560&h=315]

Nobel Prize winning neuropsychiatrist Eric Kandel describes new research which hints at the possibility of a biological basis to the unconscious mind.

Directed / Produced by
Elizabeth Rodd and Jonathan Fowler


[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUXtGQkJcQ0&w=560&h=315]

Learn every gesture and body language cue in one video. Eye, hand, leg, arm, and mouth gestures are completely covered. Gestures and Body Language Series Be an expert in body language. Applies to his and her body language. Article is here http://bit.ly/apSipQ

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