Refugees

Fear and cowardice are not the way forward. ISIS has done terrible things but our reaction to them should not be to punish their victims.

Regardless of the machinations behind the current crisis in the Middle East, its effects will unsettle the whole World, including the US and Europe (http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-roots-of-the-migration-crisis-1441995372 ).

The Syrian refugee disaster presents a dilemma to the West.

A massive influx of refugees into any country compromises its social and economic stability but the crisis cannot be ignored in humanitarian and practical grounds.

Furthermore, the rise of religious fundamentalism (of all flavors: Christian, Muslim, or Jewish) is a treat to the long term viability of modern society.

Tolerance is an intractable term.  Should we tolerate the intolerant, the racist, or the violent? Who decides who’s who, who’s what? Words used in complex social situations have always a degree of double-speak; there is a disconnection between what we think we mean and our actual thinking.

Tolerance (http://www.tolerance.org/ ) is supposed to be about letting those different from us be themselves, but in practice is about pretending that we are different from ourselves. To always have a favorite football team as an essential part of our identity? Even in this limited sense, one has to be careful; it might not be healthful to display the wrong loyalty in the wrong bar.

Tolerance stems from a sated world. In times of plenty, we can afford to be kind to those who are different. We are less threatened when we are comfortable. If our 21st Century standard of living peaks—coincident with a peak in surplus energy (i.e., fossil fuels)—then we may not have the luxury of viewing our social progress as an irreversible ratchet. Hard times revive old tribal instincts: different is not welcome.

Robert Paxton says that fascism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascism )  is “a form of political behavior marked by obsessive preoccupation with community decline, humiliation, or victimhood and by compensatory cults of unity, energy, and purity, in which a mass-based party of committed nationalist militants, working in uneasy but effective collaboration with traditional elites, abandons democratic liberties and pursues with redemptive violence and without ethical or legal restraints goals of internal cleansing and external expansion.”

Yet, the conflict is not about religion nor race, but power (in the sociopathic sense) and resources. Human activity is not driven by justice but by power. In a way, justice is the right of the strong. One thing is rationalizations used to justify actions, and another, real social and psychological motives behind. These ulterior motives are not necessary explicit or even conscious.

All three religions   – Christianity, Judaism, and Islam – in conflict share the same core barbaric Bronze Age believes sated in the Hebrew Bible, and all pick and choose what’s convenient to their respective social order. Whether one is consider a Christian or a Muslim is more an accident of geography or ethnicity, than a reflection of actual belief.   That is, religion is mainly a marker of cultural identity.

The scourge of Islamic fundamentalism is a monster created by the same people crying wolf (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2014/08/18/the-islamic-state/ ).

Humans are social animals and it’s our natural instinct to be emphatic with others. It’s natural for us to bond by kinship. Unfortunately the same tribal instinct hampers our ability to recognize the essential and vital global brotherhood of man. We cling to nationality, religion, and many artificial walls we build around us that compromise our chances for long term survival (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2015/12/12/merry-xmas/ ).

We must overcome our fears and reach out for peace. To live or die together is the choice.

Fear and cowardice are not the way forward. ISIS has done terrible things but our reaction to them should not be to punish their victims.

Regardless of the machinations behind the current crisis in the Middle East, its effects will unsettle the whole World, including the US and Europe (http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-roots-of-the-migration-crisis-1441995372 ).

The Syrian refugee disaster presents a dilemma to the West.

A massive influx of refugees into any country compromises its social and economic stability but the crisis cannot be ignored in humanitarian and practical grounds.

Furthermore, the rise of religious fundamentalism (of all flavors: Christian, Muslim, or Jewish) is a treat to the long term viability of modern society.

Tolerance is an intractable term.  Should we tolerate the intolerant, the racist, or the violent? Who decides who’s who, who’s what? Words used in complex social situations have always a degree of double-speak; there is a disconnection between what we think we mean and our actual thinking.

Tolerance (http://www.tolerance.org/ ) is supposed to be about letting those different from us be themselves, but in practice is about pretending that we are different from ourselves. To always have a favorite football team as an essential part of our identity? Even in this limited sense, one has to be careful; it might not be healthful to display the wrong loyalty in the wrong bar.

Tolerance stems from a sated world. In times of plenty, we can afford to be kind to those who are different. We are less threatened when we are comfortable. If our 21st Century standard of living peaks—coincident with a peak in surplus energy (i.e., fossil fuels)—then we may not have the luxury of viewing our social progress as an irreversible ratchet. Hard times revive old tribal instincts: different is not welcome.

Robert Paxton says that fascism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascism )  is “a form of political behavior marked by obsessive preoccupation with community decline, humiliation, or victimhood and by compensatory cults of unity, energy, and purity, in which a mass-based party of committed nationalist militants, working in uneasy but effective collaboration with traditional elites, abandons democratic liberties and pursues with redemptive violence and without ethical or legal restraints goals of internal cleansing and external expansion.”

Yet, the conflict is not about religion nor race, but power (in the sociopathic sense) and resources. Human activity is not driven by justice but by power. In a way, justice is the right of the strong. One thing is rationalizations used to justify actions, and another, real social and psychological motives behind. These ulterior motives are not necessary explicit or even conscious.

All three religions   – Christianity, Judaism, and Islam – in conflict share the same core barbaric Bronze Age believes sated in the Hebrew Bible, and all pick and choose what’s convenient to their respective social order. Whether one is consider a Christian or a Muslim is more an accident of geography or ethnicity, than a reflection of actual belief.   That is, religion is mainly a marker of cultural identity.

The scourge of Islamic fundamentalism is a monster created by the same people crying wolf (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2014/08/18/the-islamic-state/ ).

Humans are social animals and it’s our natural instinct to be emphatic with others. It’s natural for us to bond by kinship. Unfortunately the same tribal instinct hampers our ability to recognize the essential and vital global brotherhood of man. We cling to nationality, religion, and many artificial walls we build around us that compromise our chances for long term survival (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2015/12/12/merry-xmas/ ).

We must overcome our fears and reach out for peace. To live or die together is the choice.

Teasing WW III

18:56 15.12.2015(updated 19:37 15.12.2015) Get short URL Pepe Escobar Read more: http://sputniknews.com/columnists/20151215/1031786484/russia-ready-war.html#ixzz3uqHoNk2f “Tense” does not even begin to describe the current Russia-Turkey geopolitical tension, which shows no sign of abating. The Empire of Chaos lavishly profits from it as a … Continue reading





18:56 15.12.2015(updated 19:37 15.12.2015) Get short URL
Pepe Escobar

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/columnists/20151215/1031786484/russia-ready-war.html#ixzz3uqHoNk2f

“Tense” does not even begin to describe the current Russia-Turkey geopolitical tension, which shows no sign of abating. The Empire of Chaos lavishly profits from it as a privileged spectator; as long as the tension lasts, prospects of Eurasia integration are hampered.
Russian intel has certainly played all possible scenarios involving a NATO Turkish army on the Turkish-Syrian border as well as the possibility of Ankara closing the Bosphorus and the Dardanelles for the Russian “Syria Express”. Erdogan may not be foolish enough to offer Russia yet another casus belli. But Moscow is taking no chances.

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/columnists/20151215/1031786484/russia-ready-war.html#ixzz3uqHOMLDW


Continuar leyendo “Teasing WW III”

France’s Burqa Ban

Published on Jan 12, 2015 Burqa Battle (2010): In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo killings, secular France has been forced to examine its relationship with the country’s Islamic minority. This 2010 report looks at tensions surrounding the controversial Islamic … Continue reading

Published on Jan 12, 2015

Burqa Battle (2010): In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo killings, secular France has been forced to examine its relationship with the country’s Islamic minority. This 2010 report looks at tensions surrounding the controversial Islamic garment.

More from our France and Islam archive: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…
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Sarkozy’s burqa ban re-wrote the rule book for assimilation politics in Europe. But with elections on the way and the current halal meat controversy, has his hard line on Islam simply fueled religious tensions?

In the previous elections Sarkozy lost serious ground to the far right and many saw the burqa ban as an attempt to salvage those votes. Yet the ban also had a lot of support from many high profile Muslims. The Imam of Drancy argued, “the burka is an Afghani phenomenon. Afghan equals Taliban. Taliban equals terrorism.” With halal meat the hot topic of next month’s election campaigns, has Sarkozy been too dangerously divisive towards France’s Islamic population?

French muslims

Published on Jan 8, 2015 French Connection (2002): How tension over immigration has put French multiculturalism on the ropes. Watch the French Islamist at the heart of the 9/11 attack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LBGK… Subscribe to journeyman for daily news and current affairs: … Continue reading

Published on Jan 8, 2015

French Connection (2002): How tension over immigration has put French multiculturalism on the ropes.

Watch the French Islamist at the heart of the 9/11 attack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LBGK…
Subscribe to journeyman for daily news and current affairs: http://www.youtube.com/journeymanpict…
For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=19224

“There is such dissatisfaction, such humiliation, such resentment at the failure to fully penetrate French society”, explains Prof Dominique Moisi. “The reality is a land of great inequality.” In the slums of Marseilles, children play among the rubbish. Unemployment, poverty and systematic discrimination is driving young Muslims into the arms of extremists.

ABC Australia – Ref. 1437

Every week Journeyman offers a brand new documentary, fresh out of the cutting room. They’re award winning documentaries, some destined for the festival circuit and some for broadcast. The one thing you can know is that here you get to see them when they’re fresh, often before they appear anywhere else. To watch them in full go to our VOD platform at http://jman.TV

Santa Maria Tlahuitoltepec

Naomi Larsson @naomilars Wednesday 17 June 2015 09.48 EDT An indigenous community is considering legal action against Isabel Marant after a blouse in her collection showed similarities to their traditional costume. A blouse from Marant’s Etoile collection has been singled out … Continue reading

An indigenous community is considering legal action against Isabel Marant after a blouse in her collection showed similarities to their traditional costume.

A blouse from Marant’s Etoile collection has been singled out by the community of Santa Maria Tlahuitoltepec, which believes it bears striking resemblance to their traditional costume. In a solemn press conference last week they stated: “Isabel Marant is committing a plagiarism because the Etoile spring-summer 2015 collection contains the graphical elements specific to the Tlahuitoltepec blouse, a design which has transcended borders, and is not a novel creation as is affirmed by the designer.” They are now asking for reparation damages from the designer and are looking into the possibility of taking up legal action.

Django Reinhardt

Published on Apr 18, 2012 Uniquely, Django Reinhardt fits several simultaneous archetypes. He is the streetwise kid turned celebrity. He is the miraculous surivor of an accident who went on to overcome his handicap. He is the illiterate who used … Continue reading

Published on Apr 18, 2012
Uniquely, Django Reinhardt fits several simultaneous archetypes. He is the streetwise kid turned celebrity. He is the miraculous surivor of an accident who went on to overcome his handicap. He is the illiterate who used musical notes as a universal language. He is the whimsical musician who defied every setback. Django was already a legend in his own lifetime, and this film tells of the life and times of a genius to whom death came too early. Yet another, final archetype. But above all it allows us to discover the dazzling talent of one of the greatest jazz guitarists of the twentieth century. Recorded in Paris and Île-de-France, 2010.

Bonus
“Anouman” played by David Reinhardt (guitar solo); “Anouman” played by David Reinhardt (trio formation); “All love” composed by Babik Reinhardt , played by David Reinhardt (guitar solo), Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Gra pelli playing “J’attendrai” in BBC Studios, London

JeanDjangoReinhardt[1][2] (French: [d?ã??o ??jna?t] or [d????o ?en??t]; 23 January 1910 – 16 May 1953) was a Belgium-born French guitarist and composer of Romani ethnicity.[3][4]

Reinhardt is regarded as one of the greatest guitar players of all time; he was the first important European jazz musician who made major contributions to the development of the guitar genre. After his fourth and fifth fingers were paralyzed when he suffered burns in a fire, Reinhardt used only the index and middle finger of his left hand on his solos. He created an entirely new style of jazz guitar technique (sometimes called ‘hot’ jazz guitar), which has since become a living musical tradition within French Gypsy culture. With violinist Stéphane Grappelli, Reinhardt co-founded the Quintette du Hot Club de France, described by critic Thom Jurek as “one of the most original bands in the history of recorded jazz”.[5] Reinhardt’s most popular compositions have become jazz standards, including “Minor Swing“, “Daphne”, “Belleville”, “Djangology”, “Swing ’42”, and “Nuages“.


The Sykes–Picot Agreement

The Sykes–Picot Agreement, officially known as the Asia Minor Agreement, was a secret agreement between the governments of the United Kingdom and France,[1] with the assent of Russia, defining their proposed spheres of influence and control in the Middle East … Continue reading

The Sykes–Picot Agreement, officially known as the Asia Minor Agreement, was a secret agreement between the governments of the United Kingdom and France,[1] with the assent of Russia, defining their proposed spheres of influence and control in the Middle East should the Triple Entente succeed in defeating the Ottoman Empireduring World War I. The negotiation of the treaty occurred between November 1915 and March 1916.[2] The agreement was concluded on 16 May 1916.[3]

The agreement effectively divided the Arab provinces of the Ottoman Empire outside the Arabian peninsula into areas of future British and French control or influence.[4] An “international administration” was proposed forPalestine.[5] The terms were negotiated by the French diplomat François Georges-Picot and Briton Sir Mark Sykes. The Russian Tsarist government was a minor party to the Sykes–Picot agreement, and when, following theRussian Revolution of October 1917, the Bolsheviks exposed the agreement, “the British were embarrassed, theArabs dismayed and the Turks delighted.”

Le cochon de gaza

Le cochon de gaza film complet

Published on Mar 26, 2015
Après une tempête, Jafaar, un pêcheur palestinien de Gaza, remonte par hasard dans ses filets un cochon tombé d’un cargo.

Le cochon de gaza film complet

Published on Mar 26, 2015
Après une tempête, Jafaar, un pêcheur palestinien de Gaza, remonte par hasard dans ses filets un cochon tombé d’un cargo.

Kaputt

Kaputt

Da Wikipedia, l’enciclopedia libera.
« Kaputt è un libro crudele. La sua crudeltà è la più straordinaria esperienza che io abbia tratto dallo spettacolo dell’Europa in questi anni di guerra. Tuttavia, fra i protagonisti di questo libro, la guerra non è che un personaggio secondario. Si potrebbe dire che ha solo un valore di pretesto, se i pretesti inevitabili non appartenessero all’ordine della fatalità. In Kaputt la guerra conta dunque come fatalità. Non v’entra in altro modo. Direi che v’entra non da protagonista, ma da spettatrice, in quello stesso senso in cui è spettatore un paesaggio. La guerra è il paesaggio oggettivo di questo libro. »
(Curzio Malaparte)
Kaputt
Autore Curzio Malaparte
1ª ed. originale 1944
Genere romanzo
Sottogenere autobiografia (parziale)
Lingua originale italiano
Kaputt è un libro scritto da Curzio Malaparte tra il 1941 ed il 1943. È difficile definirlo un romanzo[1] nel senso comune del termine: non ha uno sviluppo di trama prevedibile.
È piuttosto un insieme di episodi, in parte autobiografici, tenuti assieme dal riferimento alla cornice bellica in cui si dipana il racconto

Kaputt

Da Wikipedia, l’enciclopedia libera.
« Kaputt è un libro crudele. La sua crudeltà è la più straordinaria esperienza che io abbia tratto dallo spettacolo dell’Europa in questi anni di guerra. Tuttavia, fra i protagonisti di questo libro, la guerra non è che un personaggio secondario. Si potrebbe dire che ha solo un valore di pretesto, se i pretesti inevitabili non appartenessero all’ordine della fatalità. In Kaputt la guerra conta dunque come fatalità. Non v’entra in altro modo. Direi che v’entra non da protagonista, ma da spettatrice, in quello stesso senso in cui è spettatore un paesaggio. La guerra è il paesaggio oggettivo di questo libro. »
(Curzio Malaparte)
Kaputt
Autore Curzio Malaparte
1ª ed. originale 1944
Genere romanzo
Sottogenere autobiografia (parziale)
Lingua originale italiano
Kaputt è un libro scritto da Curzio Malaparte tra il 1941 ed il 1943. È difficile definirlo un romanzo[1] nel senso comune del termine: non ha uno sviluppo di trama prevedibile.
È piuttosto un insieme di episodi, in parte autobiografici, tenuti assieme dal riferimento alla cornice bellica in cui si dipana il racconto