el principal productor mundial de aguacate

Los daños ocultos que provoca el aguacate, el “oro verde” de México Alberto Nájar BBC Mundo, Ciudad de México Michoacán: cómo se convirtió un violento estado de México en el principal productor mundial de aguacate Juan Paullier BBC Mundo, Ciudad de México (@juanpaullier) ¿Por qué el aguacate mexicano causa controversia en Costa Rica? Redacción BBC Mundo

Los daños ocultos que provoca el aguacate, el “oro verde” de México

Michoacán: cómo se convirtió un violento estado de México en el principal productor mundial de aguacate

drug planes

DC-9 ‘Cocaine One’ kingpin’s secret conviction

It was the biggest drug seizure on an airplane in Mexican history. It led directly to the forced sale of Wachovia, then America’s 4th largest bank. And it threatened to become America’s most notorious drug scandal since Iran Contra.
Yet when a leader of the drug smuggling organization responsible for the flight of the DC-9 airliner dubbed “Cocaine One” that was busted in the Yucatan carrying 5.5 tons of cocaine quietly pled guilty to unrelated drug charges two years ago in a Federal Court in Miami, his role in the massive drug move was kept secret from officials preparing his Pre-Sentence Report (PSI),  from journalists, and even from the Federal judge in the case.


An American-registered drug plane has been plying the airspace over Central and South America carrying cargoes of cocaine for a good long while (authorities admit they’ve been “investigating” it since 2011) without apparent incident, until recently, when a newspaper in Costa Rica reported that the President of Costa Rica had been seen using it to fly to Hugo Chavez’s funeral, as well as the recent wedding of the son of Peru’s Vice-President in Lima.


Six years ago this week an American-registered luxury jet, a Gulfstream II—later dubbed “Cocaine 2”—crashed just before dawn in the middle of the jungle in Mexico’s Yucatan carrying four tons of cocaine. The event, and its aftermath, changed forever an official narrative of the war on drugs which has for years been pushing the notion that there is no significant American involvement in the global drug trade, and no American Drug Lords.  

A control tower employee in Ciudad del Carmen, the airport where the DSC-9 landed, causing something of a fuss, told authorities at a crucial juncture in what was an extremely tense situation, as the American-registered DC-9 carrying 5.5 tons of cocaine circled and requested permission to land, she was approached inside the airport terminal by an American she’d never seen before.

She described him as being 40 years old, with blond hair and a deep tan, and he was wearing a green polo shirt. The American, she said, hadn’t just wanted officials in the airport to let the plane land. He wanted the tower to certify the flight, meaning the DC-9 could then continue its journey, as a domestic flight, which would not need to clear Mexican Customs.

Said green polo shirt-wearing American remains unidentified. He just disappeared from narratives of the event… except for one respected journalist at Mexican newspaper Proceso, who wisely picked up on this detail, followed up, and then reported that among the contingent of drug traffickers awaiting the arrival of the plane on the ground with as much nonchalance as they could muster…the American had been in charge.

In every country in the world in which drugs are present, and illegal, control of the drug trade is the most important tool in perpetuating that country’s oligarchy, more important than a police force with a billion Billy clubs.

The guys chopping off heads in Mexico while wearing bandoliers strapped across their bare chests are barely into middle management.

When the Gulfstream’s fuselage split into pieces on impact, spilling cocaine across an area the length of three football fields, a chain of events was set in motion that would prove that nothing could be further from the truth.  
Several hundred miles away, and more than a year earlier, in May 2006, the Gulfstream’s ‘sister ship,’ a DC-9 which became known as “Cocaine1″ because it was painted to impersonate an official US Government plane, had been caught carrying more than 5.5 tons of cocaine.
The two planes shared too many identifying characteristics, including interlocking owners and a shared base in the sleepy retirement Mecca of St Petersburg FL  on Florida’s Gulf Coast, to be coincidence. 
The twin events represented the biggest sea change in the global drug trade since the death of Pablo Escobar in 1992, or the assassination of Barry Seal in 1986. Today, despite the intervening years, new details continue to emerge about the case. 

During the course of the investigation which followed it became clear that the money used to purchase both planes—the Gulfstream and the DC-9—was laundered and funnelled through Wachovia Bank, and more importantly, that it represented just a tiny sliver of the more than $380 billion of drug money that had been laundered during the past six years through what was then America’s 4th largest bank. 
Wachovia was fined a record $165 million. The sullied bank was forced to sell itself to Wells Fargo Bank in Salt Lake City.
At about three a.m. the normal quiet of the town of Tixkobob  (pop. 17000), located an hour outside of the Yucatan capital of Merida, was disturbed by the deafening noise of a low-flying twin-engine jet circling overhead, and the whine and buzzing of several military helicopters in pursuit. 
The noise went on for an incredible two hours until, out of fuel, the jet crashed three miles outside town on a plantation, Rancho San Francisco, identified by Mexican journalists as belonging to an American named Martin Wood.
Although remote, the crash site quickly drew a crowd. Slightly after dawn a Mexican Army unit from the Tenth Military Region deployed to the site, secured it, and then guarded it over the next 36 hours, repelling intrusions from other Mexican law enforcement agencies, as well as from the DEA, which flew six agents to the scene from Mexico City to reconnoiter, only to see them turned away from the site.

Days earlier, the Gulfstream jet had begun its journey at Fort Lauderdale’s notorious Executive Airport, flying southwest across the Gulf of Mexico to Cancun. There the pilot made arrangements with the airport’s general manager that they would be able to land without incident at the airport on their return from Colombia laden with cocaine. 
The next day, negotiations being successfully concluded, the Gulfstream  took off for Colombia. Nothing unusual was noticed. The plane was on a well-worn path. The airport in Cancun was the busiest drug port in Mexico.
After loading its cargo of cocaine the following day, the Gulfstream took off from the international airport just outside Medellin, in Rio Negro Colombia, bound once more for the exclusive Mexican Caribbean resort of Cancun, in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo.
Among the mysteries surrounding the flight, the one which looms largest is this: Why did authorities at the Cancun airport change their minds, renege on their promise, and refuse the plane permission to land? 
At a press conference a year earlier after the crash of the DC-9, Mexican Attorney General Daniel Cabeza de Vaca said officials from Federal security agencies in the Yucatan were known to be in collusion with drug traffickers. Curiously, with his next breath he mentioned Kamel Nacif, 69, a Lebanese businessman in Cancun who was in the news for alleged links to an international network of pedophiles.
 
In the drug trade, it is important to recall, the title “cartel du jour” is a designation which changes rapidly and without notice. Just ask the kingpins from the Medellin, or the Cali, cartels. 
It turns out that when the drug traffickers on the Gulfstream lost their «get out of jail free» card, a drug kingpin who the DEA has called the biggest drug trafficker since Pablo Escobar had just been captured.
On August 7, just over a month earlier, a joint operation between forces including Brazil, the US,  Argentina, Spain and Uruguay took down a drug kingpin who was recently profiled here. Before being caught, Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia, known as “Lollipop” (El Chupeta), had been successfully holed up for more than five years in Sao Paulo Brazil. 
Three weeks after his arrest,  two Brazilians bought the Gulfstream.


The Sins of the Son and — The Smoking Airplane

by
Daniel Hopsicker and Michael C. Ruppert

Texas Governor and Republican Presidential contender George W. Bush and his brother Jeb, allegedly caught on videotape in 1985 picking up kilos of cocaine at a Florida airport in a DEA sting set up by Barry Seal

And a private turboprop King Air 200 supposedly caught on  tape in the sting with FAA ownership records leading directly to the CIA and some of the perpetrators of the most notorious (and never punished) major financial frauds of the ’80s. 

Add to this mix the now irrefutable proof, some of it from the CIA itself, that then Vice President George H.W. Bush was a decision maker in illegal Contra support operations connected to the «unusual» acquisition of aircraft  and that his staff participated in key financial, operational and political decisions

All these events lead inexorably to one unanswered question: How did this one plane go from being controlled by Barry Seal, the biggest drug smuggler in American history, to becoming, according to state officials,  a favored airplane of Texas Governor George W. Bush?

———————————–

Three months into an exhaustive investigation of persistent reports dating to 1995 that there exists an incriminating videotape of current Republican Presidential front-runner Bush caught in a hastily-aborted DEA cocaine sting, the central allegation remains unproven

But some startling details have been confirmed, amid a raft of new suspicions emerging from conflicting FAA records. Those records, along with other irrefutable documents, point to the existence of far more than mere happenstance or dark «conspiracy theorist speculations» in the matter of how George W. Bush came to be flying the friendly Texas skies in an airplane that was a crown jewel in the drug smuggling fleet of the notorious Barry Seal. Those documents reveal – beyond any doubt – that in the 1980s Barry Seal, with whom the CIA has consistently denied any relationship, piloted and controlled airplanes owned by the same Phoenix Arizona company, Greycas, which in a 1998 bankruptcy filing, was revealed to have been a subsidiary of the same company that owned the now defunct CIA proprietary airline Southern Air Transport.

The investigation started with a lead into the history of the aircraft (a 1982 Beechcraft King Air 200 with FAA registration number N6308F – Serial Number BB-1014).


According to a flurry of stories between Sept 15 and 17 in the Washington Post, Newsweek, and Knight Ridder newspapers, as many as six of the terrorists, including ringleader Mohammed Atta, received training at U.S. military facilities.

«U.S. military sources have given the FBI information that suggests five of the alleged hijackers of the planes used in Tuesday’s terror attacks received training at secure U.S. military installations in the 1990’s,» Newsweek reported. Newsweek also reported that three of the hijackers received training at the Pensacola Naval Station in Florida.

The “Magic Dutch Boys.” Rudi Dekkers and Arne Kruithof, two Dutch nationals, purchased the two flight schools that trained three of the four terrorist pilots to fly at the tiny Venice Airport, which has an extensive history of CIA involvement,.

DC-9 ‘Cocaine One’ kingpin’s secret conviction

It was the biggest drug seizure on an airplane in Mexican history. It led directly to the forced sale of Wachovia, then America's 4th largest bank. And it threatened to become America’s most notorious drug scandal since Iran Contra.
Yet when a leader of the drug smuggling organization responsible for the flight of the DC-9 airliner dubbed “Cocaine One” that was busted in the Yucatan carrying 5.5 tons of cocaine quietly pled guilty to unrelated drug charges two years ago in a Federal Court in Miami, his role in the massive drug move was kept secret from officials preparing his Pre-Sentence Report (PSI),  from journalists, and even from the Federal judge in the case.



An American-registered drug plane has been plying the airspace over Central and South America carrying cargoes of cocaine for a good long while (authorities admit they’ve been “investigating” it since 2011) without apparent incident, until recently, when a newspaper in Costa Rica reported that the President of Costa Rica had been seen using it to fly to Hugo Chavez’s funeral, as well as the recent wedding of the son of Peru's Vice-President in Lima.




Six years ago this week an American-registered luxury jet, a Gulfstream II—later dubbed “Cocaine 2”—crashed just before dawn in the middle of the jungle in Mexico’s Yucatan carrying four tons of cocaine. The event, and its aftermath, changed forever an official narrative of the war on drugs which has for years been pushing the notion that there is no significant American involvement in the global drug trade, and no American Drug Lords.  

A control tower employee in Ciudad del Carmen, the airport where the DSC-9 landed, causing something of a fuss, told authorities at a crucial juncture in what was an extremely tense situation, as the American-registered DC-9 carrying 5.5 tons of cocaine circled and requested permission to land, she was approached inside the airport terminal by an American she'd never seen before.

She described him as being 40 years old, with blond hair and a deep tan, and he was wearing a green polo shirt. The American, she said, hadn’t just wanted officials in the airport to let the plane land. He wanted the tower to certify the flight, meaning the DC-9 could then continue its journey, as a domestic flight, which would not need to clear Mexican Customs.

Said green polo shirt-wearing American remains unidentified. He just disappeared from narratives of the event… except for one respected journalist at Mexican newspaper Proceso, who wisely picked up on this detail, followed up, and then reported that among the contingent of drug traffickers awaiting the arrival of the plane on the ground with as much nonchalance as they could muster…the American had been in charge.

In every country in the world in which drugs are present, and illegal, control of the drug trade is the most important tool in perpetuating that country’s oligarchy, more important than a police force with a billion Billy clubs.

The guys chopping off heads in Mexico while wearing bandoliers strapped across their bare chests are barely into middle management.

When the Gulfstream's fuselage split into pieces on impact, spilling cocaine across an area the length of three football fields, a chain of events was set in motion that would prove that nothing could be further from the truth.  
Several hundred miles away, and more than a year earlier, in May 2006, the Gulfstream’s ‘sister ship,’ a DC-9 which became known as “Cocaine1" because it was painted to impersonate an official US Government plane, had been caught carrying more than 5.5 tons of cocaine.
The two planes shared too many identifying characteristics, including interlocking owners and a shared base in the sleepy retirement Mecca of St Petersburg FL  on Florida’s Gulf Coast, to be coincidence. 
The twin events represented the biggest sea change in the global drug trade since the death of Pablo Escobar in 1992, or the assassination of Barry Seal in 1986. Today, despite the intervening years, new details continue to emerge about the case. 

During the course of the investigation which followed it became clear that the money used to purchase both planes—the Gulfstream and the DC-9—was laundered and funnelled through Wachovia Bank, and more importantly, that it represented just a tiny sliver of the more than $380 billion of drug money that had been laundered during the past six years through what was then America’s 4th largest bank. 
Wachovia was fined a record $165 million. The sullied bank was forced to sell itself to Wells Fargo Bank in Salt Lake City.
At about three a.m. the normal quiet of the town of Tixkobob  (pop. 17000), located an hour outside of the Yucatan capital of Merida, was disturbed by the deafening noise of a low-flying twin-engine jet circling overhead, and the whine and buzzing of several military helicopters in pursuit. 
The noise went on for an incredible two hours until, out of fuel, the jet crashed three miles outside town on a plantation, Rancho San Francisco, identified by Mexican journalists as belonging to an American named Martin Wood.
Although remote, the crash site quickly drew a crowd. Slightly after dawn a Mexican Army unit from the Tenth Military Region deployed to the site, secured it, and then guarded it over the next 36 hours, repelling intrusions from other Mexican law enforcement agencies, as well as from the DEA, which flew six agents to the scene from Mexico City to reconnoiter, only to see them turned away from the site.

Days earlier, the Gulfstream jet had begun its journey at Fort Lauderdale’s notorious Executive Airport, flying southwest across the Gulf of Mexico to Cancun. There the pilot made arrangements with the airport’s general manager that they would be able to land without incident at the airport on their return from Colombia laden with cocaine. 
The next day, negotiations being successfully concluded, the Gulfstream  took off for Colombia. Nothing unusual was noticed. The plane was on a well-worn path. The airport in Cancun was the busiest drug port in Mexico.
After loading its cargo of cocaine the following day, the Gulfstream took off from the international airport just outside Medellin, in Rio Negro Colombia, bound once more for the exclusive Mexican Caribbean resort of Cancun, in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo.
Among the mysteries surrounding the flight, the one which looms largest is this: Why did authorities at the Cancun airport change their minds, renege on their promise, and refuse the plane permission to land? 
At a press conference a year earlier after the crash of the DC-9, Mexican Attorney General Daniel Cabeza de Vaca said officials from Federal security agencies in the Yucatan were known to be in collusion with drug traffickers. Curiously, with his next breath he mentioned Kamel Nacif, 69, a Lebanese businessman in Cancun who was in the news for alleged links to an international network of pedophiles.
 
In the drug trade, it is important to recall, the title “cartel du jour” is a designation which changes rapidly and without notice. Just ask the kingpins from the Medellin, or the Cali, cartels. 
It turns out that when the drug traffickers on the Gulfstream lost their "get out of jail free" card, a drug kingpin who the DEA has called the biggest drug trafficker since Pablo Escobar had just been captured.
On August 7, just over a month earlier, a joint operation between forces including Brazil, the US,  Argentina, Spain and Uruguay took down a drug kingpin who was recently profiled here. Before being caught, Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia, known as “Lollipop” (El Chupeta), had been successfully holed up for more than five years in Sao Paulo Brazil. 
Three weeks after his arrest,  two Brazilians bought the Gulfstream.


The Sins of the Son and -- The Smoking Airplane

by

Daniel Hopsicker and Michael C. Ruppert

Texas Governor and Republican Presidential contender George W. Bush and his brother Jeb, allegedly caught on videotape in 1985 picking up kilos of cocaine at a Florida airport in a DEA sting set up by Barry Seal

And a private turboprop King Air 200 supposedly caught on  tape in the sting with FAA ownership records leading directly to the CIA and some of the perpetrators of the most notorious (and never punished) major financial frauds of the '80s. 

Add to this mix the now irrefutable proof, some of it from the CIA itself, that then Vice President George H.W. Bush was a decision maker in illegal Contra support operations connected to the "unusual" acquisition of aircraft  and that his staff participated in key financial, operational and political decisions

All these events lead inexorably to one unanswered question: How did this one plane go from being controlled by Barry Seal, the biggest drug smuggler in American history, to becoming, according to state officials,  a favored airplane of Texas Governor George W. Bush?

-----------------------------------

Three months into an exhaustive investigation of persistent reports dating to 1995 that there exists an incriminating videotape of current Republican Presidential front-runner Bush caught in a hastily-aborted DEA cocaine sting, the central allegation remains unproven

But some startling details have been confirmed, amid a raft of new suspicions emerging from conflicting FAA records. Those records, along with other irrefutable documents, point to the existence of far more than mere happenstance or dark "conspiracy theorist speculations" in the matter of how George W. Bush came to be flying the friendly Texas skies in an airplane that was a crown jewel in the drug smuggling fleet of the notorious Barry Seal. Those documents reveal - beyond any doubt - that in the 1980s Barry Seal, with whom the CIA has consistently denied any relationship, piloted and controlled airplanes owned by the same Phoenix Arizona company, Greycas, which in a 1998 bankruptcy filing, was revealed to have been a subsidiary of the same company that owned the now defunct CIA proprietary airline Southern Air Transport.


The investigation started with a lead into the history of the aircraft (a 1982 Beechcraft King Air 200 with FAA registration number N6308F - Serial Number BB-1014).




According to a flurry of stories between Sept 15 and 17 in the Washington Post, Newsweek, and Knight Ridder newspapers, as many as six of the terrorists, including ringleader Mohammed Atta, received training at U.S. military facilities.

"U.S. military sources have given the FBI information that suggests five of the alleged hijackers of the planes used in Tuesday's terror attacks received training at secure U.S. military installations in the 1990’s," Newsweek reported. Newsweek also reported that three of the hijackers received training at the Pensacola Naval Station in Florida.

The “Magic Dutch Boys.” Rudi Dekkers and Arne Kruithof, two Dutch nationals, purchased the two flight schools that trained three of the four terrorist pilots to fly at the tiny Venice Airport, which has an extensive history of CIA involvement,.

legalización de la mariguana

Ciudad de México.- Tras reunirse con el Primer Ministro de Belice y los presidentes de Costa Rica y Honduras, el mandatario mexicano, Felipe Calderón, dijo que existe la necesidad de analizar las implicaciones sociales que tendría para Centroamérica legalizar la marihuana, como sucedió en Colorado y Washington, en Estados Unidos.

Calderón afirmó que el aval al uso recreativo de la marihuana constituye un cambio paradigmático en el interior de Estados Unidos respecto al régimen prohibicionista vigente en el resto del mundo.

«Es necesario analizar a profundidad las implicaciones sociales de políticas públicas y de salud general que se derivan para nuestras naciones de los procesos en marcha a nivel local y estatal en algunos países de nuestro continente para permitir la producción, consumo y distribución legal de la marihuana, lo cual constituye un cambio paradigmático por parte de tales entidades respecto del régimen internacional vigente», dijo el presidente en un mensaje ofrecido en Los Pinos junto a los mandatarios centroamericanos.

Además, también solicitaron que, a más tardar en 2015, se realice una asamblea general especial de la ONU sobre el problema mundial de las drogas.


MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Luis Videgaray, cabeza del equipo de transición del presidente electo, Enrique Peña Nieto, consideró que la legalización de la mariguana para uso recreativo en Washington y Colorado obligará a México y Estados Unidos a revisar las políticas de combate al narcotráfico.

Recordó que la postura del exgobernador mexiquense es en contra de la legalización como forma para enfrentar el problema de las drogas, sin embargo, dijo que está al tanto de los cambios en ese sentido.

“Estamos obviamente atentos a estas modificaciones importantes que cambian un poco las reglas del juego en la relación con Estados Unidos”, dijo en entrevista radiofónica con Joaquín López Dóriga.

Videgaray reconoció que la legalización de la mariguana en Washington y Colorado es algo que no estaba en el panorama. “Creo que nos tienen que llevar a revisar las políticas conjuntas tanto del combate al tráfico de drogas, y en general”, insistió.

Por otra parte, el coordinador general del equipo de transición confirmó que Peña Nieto se reunirá con el presidente estadunidense, Barack Obama, el 27 de noviembre y con Stephen Harper de Canadá, el 28.

Adelantó que los temas centrales de las reuniones serán: seguridad, economía, migración y la frontera.

“Ahora que ya hay un presidente reelecto inicia una etapa formal de trabajo entre México y EU”, indicó Videgaray.

Ciudad de México.- Tras reunirse con el Primer Ministro de Belice y los presidentes de Costa Rica y Honduras, el mandatario mexicano, Felipe Calderón, dijo que existe la necesidad de analizar las implicaciones sociales que tendría para Centroamérica legalizar la marihuana, como sucedió en Colorado y Washington, en Estados Unidos.

Calderón afirmó que el aval al uso recreativo de la marihuana constituye un cambio paradigmático en el interior de Estados Unidos respecto al régimen prohibicionista vigente en el resto del mundo.
"Es necesario analizar a profundidad las implicaciones sociales de políticas públicas y de salud general que se derivan para nuestras naciones de los procesos en marcha a nivel local y estatal en algunos países de nuestro continente para permitir la producción, consumo y distribución legal de la marihuana, lo cual constituye un cambio paradigmático por parte de tales entidades respecto del régimen internacional vigente", dijo el presidente en un mensaje ofrecido en Los Pinos junto a los mandatarios centroamericanos.
Además, también solicitaron que, a más tardar en 2015, se realice una asamblea general especial de la ONU sobre el problema mundial de las drogas.



MÉXICO, D.F. (apro).- Luis Videgaray, cabeza del equipo de transición del presidente electo, Enrique Peña Nieto, consideró que la legalización de la mariguana para uso recreativo en Washington y Colorado obligará a México y Estados Unidos a revisar las políticas de combate al narcotráfico.

Recordó que la postura del exgobernador mexiquense es en contra de la legalización como forma para enfrentar el problema de las drogas, sin embargo, dijo que está al tanto de los cambios en ese sentido.

“Estamos obviamente atentos a estas modificaciones importantes que cambian un poco las reglas del juego en la relación con Estados Unidos”, dijo en entrevista radiofónica con Joaquín López Dóriga.

Videgaray reconoció que la legalización de la mariguana en Washington y Colorado es algo que no estaba en el panorama. “Creo que nos tienen que llevar a revisar las políticas conjuntas tanto del combate al tráfico de drogas, y en general”, insistió.

Por otra parte, el coordinador general del equipo de transición confirmó que Peña Nieto se reunirá con el presidente estadunidense, Barack Obama, el 27 de noviembre y con Stephen Harper de Canadá, el 28.

Adelantó que los temas centrales de las reuniones serán: seguridad, economía, migración y la frontera.

“Ahora que ya hay un presidente reelecto inicia una etapa formal de trabajo entre México y EU”, indicó Videgaray.

La caravana de Televisa

MÉXICO, D.F., (apro).- Los 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua y declarados culpables de los delitos de narcotráfico, lavado de dinero y crimen organizado, podrían ser extraditados a México, una vez que concluya el juicio oral al que están siendo sometidos, según insinuó hoy la presidenta de la Corte Suprema de Justicia de Nicaragua, Alba Luz Ramos.

“No tenemos ningún interés de tenerlos aquí”, declaró a los periodistas.

El pasado 20 de diciembre, los 18 mexicanos que se identificaron como trabajadores de Televisa e incluso viajaban en camionetas con logotipos de la empresa, en una de las cuales por cierto, transportaban 9.2 millones de dólares ocultos, fueron declarados culpables por el juez de la causa, Edgard Altamirano.

Sin embargo, está pendiente la sentencia. La audiencia para tal efecto se llevará a cabo el próximo miércoles 18. La fiscalía solicitó la pena máxima, que en Nicaragua es de 30 años de cárcel.

Ana Julia Guido, la fiscal general adjunta de Nicaragua, comparte la opinión de la presidenta de la Corte, Alba Luz Ramos, en el sentido de que lo mejor es extraditar a los mexicanos.

”Para nosotros sería mucho mejor que se vayan a México, porque (aquí) significan mucho más gastos para nosotros, mucho más riesgos”, dijo.

El gobierno de México ya inició los trámites correspondientes para extraditar al grupo, a pesar de que ni las autoridades nicaragüenses ni mexicanas han aclarado plenamente si las 18 personas eran trabajadores de Televisa o forman parte de alguna organización criminal.

Según Guido, la extradición solo se puede tramitar una vez exista sentencia firme, luego de agotar todos los recursos de apelación o casación a los que tienen derecho los mexicanos.

Los 18 mexicanos fueron retenidos el pasado 20 de agosto en el puesto de seguridad de Las Manos, en la zona fronteriza con Honduras, y la policía les encontró 9.2 millones de dólares, además de rastros de cocaína, en las seis camionetas en las que se desplazaban y que tenían logotipos de Televisa.

La jefa del grupo es Raquel Alatorre, quien al momento de su detención se comunicó a un número telefónico que, ahora se sabe, corresponde a Amador Narcia, vicepresidente de Información Nacional de Televisa, entre otras personas, cuyos nombres se mantienen bajo reserva.

De acuerdo con las autoridades nicaragüenses, Alatorre Correa se habría comunicado 106 veces con Narcia antes, durante y después de que fuera detenida en Nicaragua.

Además, portaba una carta supuestamente firmada por Amador Narcia para que se les dieran todas las facilidades para el desempeño de sus funciones “periodísticas”.


Managua, Nicaragua.- La Policía nicaragüense afirmó hoy que Raquel Alatorre Correa, considerada la cabecilla del grupo de mexicanos que se hicieron pasar por periodistas de Televisa y a los que se les incautó en Nicaragua 9,2 millones de dólares, se habría comunicado con un alto cargo de esa cadena de televisión.
Así lo aseguraron este martes oficiales de la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas (DIE) de la Policía Nacional, a cargo del teniente Isaac Pérez, durante el juicio por narcotráfico y lavado de dinero, entre otros delitos, contra el grupo de mexicanos.


Un perito del DIE, Wiston Galeano, quien elaboró el análisis del intercambio de llamadas del número de Alatorre Correa, dijo que la considerada cabecilla del grupo de mexicanos tenía anotado en su agenda un número telefónico identificado como «Lic. Amador Narcia», que coincide con el nombre del vicepresidente de información nacional de Televisa.

De acuerdo con el oficial, que brindó su declaración en calidad de testigo, Alatorre Correa se habría comunicado con Narcia antes, durante y después de que fuera retenida en Nicaragua.
Las llamadas fueron realizadas entre el 25 de julio y el 24 de agosto pasado, según el agente.
Los 18 mexicanos fueron retenidos el pasado 20 de agosto en un puesto de seguridad en la zona fronteriza con Honduras y la Policía nicaragüense halló 9,2 millones de dólares, además de rastros de cocaína, en las seis camionetas en los que se desplazaban y que tenían logotipos de Televisa.

Según las investigaciones, los mexicanos portaban una carta supuestamente firmada por Amador Narcia para que respaldaran la cobertura periodística a los falsos comunicadores.

El fiscal nicaragüense Armando Juárez confirmó hoy que Televisa solicitó al Ministerio Público del país una investigación aparte contra el grupo de falsos periodistas mexicanos acusados en Nicaragua de narcotráfico y otros delitos.

«La investigación es sobre si en realidad algún empleado de Televisa firmó o no la carta (de acreditación con la que viajaban). Esa es una denuncia que puso la misma Televisa en Nicaragua y que nosotros estamos obligados a complementar», explicó Juárez.

La Fiscalía nicaragüense espera obtener en los primeros 15 días de enero una firma original de Amador Narcia para compararla con los folios que portaban los acusados.

Televisa ha negado algún vínculo con los detenidos.

Durante el juicio, otro testigo policial confirmó que el grupo de mexicanos había ingresado a Nicaragua en otras ocasiones.

Los que más transitaron, según el testigo, fueron Alatorre Correa, con 43 entradas y salidas, Salvador Guardado con 40 y Julio Alvarado, con 37.
Aunque los pasaportes incautados son verdaderos, cada uno de los 18 mexicanos hizo trámites con al menos tres identificaciones falsas, aseguró otro inspector de la Policía Nacional.

Un especialista de la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas testificó que el grupo tenía registrados 132 certificados de vehículos cuya legitimidad no pudo ser confirmada, así como 18 placas de vehículos diferentes.

La Fiscalía nicaragüense acusa a los 18 detenidos mexicanos por los delitos de narcotráfico, lavado de dinero y crimen organizado, y de ser un grupo criminal «altamente organizado» dedicado al tráfico de «grandes cantidades» de droga entre Costa Rica y México.

El juez noveno del distrito penal de juicio de Managua, Edgard Altamirano, encargado del caso, ordenó un receso en horas de la noche para continuar posteriormente con los alegatos orales.


MÉXICO, D.F. (proceso.com.mx).- Entre 2008 y 2012, los 18 mexicanos procesados en Nicaragua ingresaron a ese país en más de 40 ocasiones, de acuerdo con registros migratorios consultados por la agencia informativa AFP.

La acusación de la fiscalía indica que la líder Raquel Alatorre y cuatro integrantes de la banda ingresaron por cuatro puestos de migración y utilizaron cinco pasaportes.

El proceso contra los mexicanos se reanudará este martes luego de que el juez suspendió el jueves pasado la audiencia, a petición de los abogados de la defensa con el fin de estudiar las pruebas.

El informe de Investigaciones y Análisis de Movimientos Migratorios y Certificados de Vehículos, realizado por la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas (DIE) de la Policía, indica que los mexicanos usaban pasaportes originales con diferente numeración y que por certificado vehicular utilizaban diferentes números de placas.

Además, agrega que el tránsito por Nicaragua de la supuesta red de narcotraficantes aumentó en número de viajes, personas y medios de movilización.

Los acusados usaban identificaciones como empleados de Televisa y presentaban cartas de acreditación de dicha empresa.

Su destino final era Panamá y posteriormente Costa Rica, señala el documento.

La información extraída de los GPS instalados en seis vehículos en que se movilizaban establece posición en Hidalgo y como destino final la localidad de Aserri, en Costa Rica.

De acuerdo con el periódico El Nuevo Diario, de Nicaragua, una carta fechada el 10 de diciembre y dirigida a la comisionada general Glenda Zavala, jefa de la Dirección de Auxilio Judicial (DAJ), indica los resultados de la investigación realizada por los especialistas de la DIE a las llamadas hechas entre julio y agosto por Alatorre Correa.

En total efectuó 249 llamadas a 20 números, siendo el mayor número de ellas las hechas al teléfono identificado como del “Licenciado Amador Narcia Estrada” (5215548149887), el vicepresidente nacional de información de Televisa. Le siguen 36 llamadas al número mexicano (5213317618246) y 20 al 525548149887.

El teléfono usado por la mexicana corresponde al de una compañía nicaragüense, 87258474. Los resultados finales contienen un esquema donde se ubica a Juan Luis Torres a la par de la fotografía de Alatorre Correa. Ambos realizaron llamadas a un mismo número telefónico, el 5215511950449, cuyo dueño no fue identificado, señala el diario.


A partir de 2010, el tránsito por Nicaragua de los presuntos integrantes de la red de narcotraficantes se incrementó en número de viajes, personas y medios de movilización.

Managua, Nicaragua.- Los 18 mexicanos procesados en Nicaragua por actividades ligadas al narcotráfico ingresaron al país centroamericano por los cuatro puestos fronterizos en más de 40 ocasiones entre 2008 y 2012, según registros migratorios.

La líder del grupo, Raquel Alatorre, y cuatro miembros más, señalados como los más antiguos, ingresaron más de 40 veces por los cuatro puestos de migración y usaron cinco pasaportes, según el escrito acusatorio de la fiscalía.

El informe de Investigaciones y Análisis de Movimientos Migratorios y Certificados de Vehículos, realizado por la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas (DIE) de la Policía, forma parte de las nuevas pruebas aportadas por la fiscalía en el juicio.

El juez noveno de Distrito Penal de Juicio, Edgard Altamirano, suspendió el jueves la audiencia a petición de los abogados de la defensa para estudiar las pruebas; el proceso se reanudará el próximo martes.

«Estas personas durante sus ingresos y salidas comúnmente se identificaban con tres a cuatro pasaportes, con diferente numeración y por certificado vehicular usaban diferentes números de placas», precisa el informe.

El análisis efectuado a los pasaportes determinó que son originales.

A partir de 2010, el tránsito por Nicaragua de los presuntos integrantes de la red de narcotraficantes se incrementó en número de viajes, personas y medios de movilización.

Los acusados usaban documentos de identidad como empleados de la empresa Televisa y presentaban cartas de acreditación de dicha empresa.

Procedían de México y transitaban por los países de Centroamérica. Su destino final era Panamá, en un primer momento, y posteriormente Costa Rica, agrega el documento.

La información extraída de los GPS instalados en seis vehículos en que se movilizaban establece posición en Hidalgo y como destino final la localidad de Aserri, en Costa Rica.

Hay igualmente registros de estancia en varios estados mexicanos y en las localidades hondureñas de Santa Barbara, Gualioco, Siguatepeque (Comayagua) y Danlí; en las nicaragüenses Las Manos, Estelí, Managua, Nandaime y Peñas Blancas, así como en Liberia y Heredia, en Costa Rica.

Detenidos en posesión de 9.2 millones de dólares el 20 de agosto en el puesto de Las Manos, en Nicaragua, son acusados por delitos de lavado de dinero, asociación al crimen organizado y tráfico internacional de droga


MANAGUA.- Raquel Alatorrre sigue demostrando su liderazgo natural en el seno del grupo de 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua. Minutos después de concluir la audiencia preparatoria del juicio, que se celebró el viernes 9 en el juzgado noveno penal de Managua, la mujer de edad misteriosa, de baja estatura y cintura de avispa, se acercó a consolar y dar aliento a dos compañeros que sollozaban en silencio.


En la semana que termina, el caso de los 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua cuando transportaban 9.2 millones de dólares de origen desconocido en camionetas con logotipos de Televisa rebasó ya el simple encono mediático-profesional entre Televisa y Carmen Aristegui. Mientras la televisora busca ahora atribuir a motivaciones empresariales sus reportes sobre el caso difundidos en el espacio radiofónico de MVS, ella aclara: “Se quiere desacreditar a la periodista para desacreditar el todo”. En un virulento comunicado, la empresa de Emilio Azcárraga Jean optó de plano por descalificar las documentadas investigaciones de Aristegui con un simple calificativo: ella “miente”.


Caso Televisa-Nicaragua: muchas preguntas abiertas

A más de dos meses de la detención de 18 mexicanos que viajaban en seis vehículos con logotipos de Televisa, en una garita fronteriza de Nicaragua, el caso sigue siendo una incógnita.

El grupo, que viajó desde México a Costa Rica y regresaba vía Nicaragua, fue detenido el 20 de agosto. A bordo de los vehículos, la Policía Nacional nicaragüense encontró ocultos en compartimentos y maletas 9.2 millones de dólares en efectivo (que según la policía contenían restos de cocaína). Por estos hechos, el ministerio público nicaragüense abrió una investigación.

Desde los primeros días, los mexicanos detenidos declararon ser empleados de Televisa. Durante semanas lo han reiterado. La empresa lo niega.

Antes que la empresa, el gobierno mexicano, a través del embajador de México en Nicaragua, Rodrigo Labardini, declaró ante la autoridad ministerial que las personas detenidas «no eran de Televisa». En el mismo sentido se ha pronunciado Marisela Morales, titular de la PGR. Sin embargo, la Cancillería y la PGR han reconocido que en ambos casos la fuente de información fue la propia televisora.

Televisa ha rechazado cualquier vínculo con los detenidos y con la propiedad de los seis vehículos confiscados en Nicaragua. Y lo ha reiterado varias veces a través de su noticiero estelar.

Noticias MVS investigó y documentó que las seis camionetas confiscadas no sólo tenían los logotipos de la empresa, sino que estaban bien equipadas para realizar transmisiones de televisión, y que las mismas fueron registradas ante la autoridad vehicular del Distrito Federal (Setravi) a nombre de «Televisa, SA
de CV».

La Procuraduría de Justicia capitalina informó el 1 de noviembre que el registro de esos vehículos no fue realizado por el apoderado legal de la empresa. Sin embargo, confirmó que en los expedientes de registro se presentaron todos los documentos necesarios para realizar el trámite y que todos son verdaderos (sólo uno es extemporáneo) y ninguno es falso.

¿Quién registró entonces los vehículos en Setravi? ¿Por qué y para qué?

El 7 de octubre, la revista Proceso publicó cartas que fueron encontradas en un fólder, en el interior de una de las camionetas. Las misivas supuestamente están firmadas por Amador Narcia Estrada, vicepresidente de Información Nacional de Televisa, y en ellas se pide a las autoridades de Nicaragua y Costa Rica que faciliten a los supuestos periodistas la realización de su trabajo.

Cuando ha sido aludido, Narcia sólo ha respondido vía Twitter: «Por supuesto, nada que ver con el tema de las camionetas de Nicaragua. Ya se ha dicho varias veces» (1 de octubre)

«Proceso miente otra vez. Dice que son mías unas cartas falsas: no es mi firma, el sello es apócrifo y esa ‘Dirección’ no existe en Televisa» (7 de octubre).

El 8 de noviembre Noticias MVS y el sitio nicaragüense de internet confidencial.com.ni publicaron que existen cartas similares con la firma «Narcia Estrada» dirigidas a autoridades de Honduras y de un estado mexicano.

Asimismo, la investigación reveló que en la agenda telefónica de Raquel Alatorre Correa, la líder del grupo, la Policía Nacional encontró contactos registrados como «Lic. Narcia Estrada» y «Oficina Televisa». Alatorre llamó al primero de esos números telefónicos el día de su detención.

El 26 de septiembre, el fiscal especial del Ministerio Público de Nicaragua, Armando Juárez, refirió que algunos de los detenidos intentaron comunicarse con «personal de Televisa» cuando fueron detenidos.

Varios de ellos aún reiteran que trabajaban para Televisa.

Los 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua están acusados de «narcotráfico, delincuencia organizada y lavado de dinero».

El juicio en su contra se inicia este viernes 9 de noviembre. Las autoridades de ese país han aclarado que «la relación de los detenidos con Televisa corresponde investigarla a las autoridades mexicanas».

Aún quedan muchas interrogantes: ¿Quiénes son los 18 mexicanos que integraban esta «caravana» de vehículos? ¿Para quién trabajan? ¿Por qué desde el principio declararon trabajar para Televisa? ¿Cuántas veces antes de ahora viajaron de México a Centroamérica en este tipo de vehículos? ¿Quiénes registraron las seis camionetas a nombre de la empresa?, ¿Quién tuvo acceso a documentos no apócrifos de la televisora y quién los presentó ante módulos de la Setravi? ¿Por qué las camionetas que no son de la televisora tienen equipos para transmisión televisiva? ¿A quiénes llamaron los detenidos en México?

MÉXICO, D.F., (apro).- Los 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua y declarados culpables de los delitos de narcotráfico, lavado de dinero y crimen organizado, podrían ser extraditados a México, una vez que concluya el juicio oral al que están siendo sometidos, según insinuó hoy la presidenta de la Corte Suprema de Justicia de Nicaragua, Alba Luz Ramos.

“No tenemos ningún interés de tenerlos aquí”, declaró a los periodistas.

El pasado 20 de diciembre, los 18 mexicanos que se identificaron como trabajadores de Televisa e incluso viajaban en camionetas con logotipos de la empresa, en una de las cuales por cierto, transportaban 9.2 millones de dólares ocultos, fueron declarados culpables por el juez de la causa, Edgard Altamirano.

Sin embargo, está pendiente la sentencia. La audiencia para tal efecto se llevará a cabo el próximo miércoles 18. La fiscalía solicitó la pena máxima, que en Nicaragua es de 30 años de cárcel.

Ana Julia Guido, la fiscal general adjunta de Nicaragua, comparte la opinión de la presidenta de la Corte, Alba Luz Ramos, en el sentido de que lo mejor es extraditar a los mexicanos.

”Para nosotros sería mucho mejor que se vayan a México, porque (aquí) significan mucho más gastos para nosotros, mucho más riesgos”, dijo.

El gobierno de México ya inició los trámites correspondientes para extraditar al grupo, a pesar de que ni las autoridades nicaragüenses ni mexicanas han aclarado plenamente si las 18 personas eran trabajadores de Televisa o forman parte de alguna organización criminal.

Según Guido, la extradición solo se puede tramitar una vez exista sentencia firme, luego de agotar todos los recursos de apelación o casación a los que tienen derecho los mexicanos.

Los 18 mexicanos fueron retenidos el pasado 20 de agosto en el puesto de seguridad de Las Manos, en la zona fronteriza con Honduras, y la policía les encontró 9.2 millones de dólares, además de rastros de cocaína, en las seis camionetas en las que se desplazaban y que tenían logotipos de Televisa.

La jefa del grupo es Raquel Alatorre, quien al momento de su detención se comunicó a un número telefónico que, ahora se sabe, corresponde a Amador Narcia, vicepresidente de Información Nacional de Televisa, entre otras personas, cuyos nombres se mantienen bajo reserva.

De acuerdo con las autoridades nicaragüenses, Alatorre Correa se habría comunicado 106 veces con Narcia antes, durante y después de que fuera detenida en Nicaragua.

Además, portaba una carta supuestamente firmada por Amador Narcia para que se les dieran todas las facilidades para el desempeño de sus funciones “periodísticas”.



Managua, Nicaragua.- La Policía nicaragüense afirmó hoy que Raquel Alatorre Correa, considerada la cabecilla del grupo de mexicanos que se hicieron pasar por periodistas de Televisa y a los que se les incautó en Nicaragua 9,2 millones de dólares, se habría comunicado con un alto cargo de esa cadena de televisión.
Así lo aseguraron este martes oficiales de la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas (DIE) de la Policía Nacional, a cargo del teniente Isaac Pérez, durante el juicio por narcotráfico y lavado de dinero, entre otros delitos, contra el grupo de mexicanos.


Un perito del DIE, Wiston Galeano, quien elaboró el análisis del intercambio de llamadas del número de Alatorre Correa, dijo que la considerada cabecilla del grupo de mexicanos tenía anotado en su agenda un número telefónico identificado como "Lic. Amador Narcia", que coincide con el nombre del vicepresidente de información nacional de Televisa.

De acuerdo con el oficial, que brindó su declaración en calidad de testigo, Alatorre Correa se habría comunicado con Narcia antes, durante y después de que fuera retenida en Nicaragua.
Las llamadas fueron realizadas entre el 25 de julio y el 24 de agosto pasado, según el agente.
Los 18 mexicanos fueron retenidos el pasado 20 de agosto en un puesto de seguridad en la zona fronteriza con Honduras y la Policía nicaragüense halló 9,2 millones de dólares, además de rastros de cocaína, en las seis camionetas en los que se desplazaban y que tenían logotipos de Televisa.

Según las investigaciones, los mexicanos portaban una carta supuestamente firmada por Amador Narcia para que respaldaran la cobertura periodística a los falsos comunicadores.

El fiscal nicaragüense Armando Juárez confirmó hoy que Televisa solicitó al Ministerio Público del país una investigación aparte contra el grupo de falsos periodistas mexicanos acusados en Nicaragua de narcotráfico y otros delitos.
"La investigación es sobre si en realidad algún empleado de Televisa firmó o no la carta (de acreditación con la que viajaban). Esa es una denuncia que puso la misma Televisa en Nicaragua y que nosotros estamos obligados a complementar", explicó Juárez.
La Fiscalía nicaragüense espera obtener en los primeros 15 días de enero una firma original de Amador Narcia para compararla con los folios que portaban los acusados.

Televisa ha negado algún vínculo con los detenidos.

Durante el juicio, otro testigo policial confirmó que el grupo de mexicanos había ingresado a Nicaragua en otras ocasiones.

Los que más transitaron, según el testigo, fueron Alatorre Correa, con 43 entradas y salidas, Salvador Guardado con 40 y Julio Alvarado, con 37.
Aunque los pasaportes incautados son verdaderos, cada uno de los 18 mexicanos hizo trámites con al menos tres identificaciones falsas, aseguró otro inspector de la Policía Nacional.

Un especialista de la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas testificó que el grupo tenía registrados 132 certificados de vehículos cuya legitimidad no pudo ser confirmada, así como 18 placas de vehículos diferentes.

La Fiscalía nicaragüense acusa a los 18 detenidos mexicanos por los delitos de narcotráfico, lavado de dinero y crimen organizado, y de ser un grupo criminal "altamente organizado" dedicado al tráfico de "grandes cantidades" de droga entre Costa Rica y México.

El juez noveno del distrito penal de juicio de Managua, Edgard Altamirano, encargado del caso, ordenó un receso en horas de la noche para continuar posteriormente con los alegatos orales.



MÉXICO, D.F. (proceso.com.mx).- Entre 2008 y 2012, los 18 mexicanos procesados en Nicaragua ingresaron a ese país en más de 40 ocasiones, de acuerdo con registros migratorios consultados por la agencia informativa AFP.

La acusación de la fiscalía indica que la líder Raquel Alatorre y cuatro integrantes de la banda ingresaron por cuatro puestos de migración y utilizaron cinco pasaportes.

El proceso contra los mexicanos se reanudará este martes luego de que el juez suspendió el jueves pasado la audiencia, a petición de los abogados de la defensa con el fin de estudiar las pruebas.

El informe de Investigaciones y Análisis de Movimientos Migratorios y Certificados de Vehículos, realizado por la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas (DIE) de la Policía, indica que los mexicanos usaban pasaportes originales con diferente numeración y que por certificado vehicular utilizaban diferentes números de placas.

Además, agrega que el tránsito por Nicaragua de la supuesta red de narcotraficantes aumentó en número de viajes, personas y medios de movilización.

Los acusados usaban identificaciones como empleados de Televisa y presentaban cartas de acreditación de dicha empresa.

Su destino final era Panamá y posteriormente Costa Rica, señala el documento.

La información extraída de los GPS instalados en seis vehículos en que se movilizaban establece posición en Hidalgo y como destino final la localidad de Aserri, en Costa Rica.

De acuerdo con el periódico El Nuevo Diario, de Nicaragua, una carta fechada el 10 de diciembre y dirigida a la comisionada general Glenda Zavala, jefa de la Dirección de Auxilio Judicial (DAJ), indica los resultados de la investigación realizada por los especialistas de la DIE a las llamadas hechas entre julio y agosto por Alatorre Correa.

En total efectuó 249 llamadas a 20 números, siendo el mayor número de ellas las hechas al teléfono identificado como del “Licenciado Amador Narcia Estrada” (5215548149887), el vicepresidente nacional de información de Televisa. Le siguen 36 llamadas al número mexicano (5213317618246) y 20 al 525548149887.

El teléfono usado por la mexicana corresponde al de una compañía nicaragüense, 87258474. Los resultados finales contienen un esquema donde se ubica a Juan Luis Torres a la par de la fotografía de Alatorre Correa. Ambos realizaron llamadas a un mismo número telefónico, el 5215511950449, cuyo dueño no fue identificado, señala el diario.



A partir de 2010, el tránsito por Nicaragua de los presuntos integrantes de la red de narcotraficantes se incrementó en número de viajes, personas y medios de movilización.


Managua, Nicaragua.- Los 18 mexicanos procesados en Nicaragua por actividades ligadas al narcotráfico ingresaron al país centroamericano por los cuatro puestos fronterizos en más de 40 ocasiones entre 2008 y 2012, según registros migratorios.

La líder del grupo, Raquel Alatorre, y cuatro miembros más, señalados como los más antiguos, ingresaron más de 40 veces por los cuatro puestos de migración y usaron cinco pasaportes, según el escrito acusatorio de la fiscalía.

El informe de Investigaciones y Análisis de Movimientos Migratorios y Certificados de Vehículos, realizado por la Dirección de Investigaciones Económicas (DIE) de la Policía, forma parte de las nuevas pruebas aportadas por la fiscalía en el juicio.

El juez noveno de Distrito Penal de Juicio, Edgard Altamirano, suspendió el jueves la audiencia a petición de los abogados de la defensa para estudiar las pruebas; el proceso se reanudará el próximo martes.

"Estas personas durante sus ingresos y salidas comúnmente se identificaban con tres a cuatro pasaportes, con diferente numeración y por certificado vehicular usaban diferentes números de placas", precisa el informe.

El análisis efectuado a los pasaportes determinó que son originales.

A partir de 2010, el tránsito por Nicaragua de los presuntos integrantes de la red de narcotraficantes se incrementó en número de viajes, personas y medios de movilización.

Los acusados usaban documentos de identidad como empleados de la empresa Televisa y presentaban cartas de acreditación de dicha empresa.

Procedían de México y transitaban por los países de Centroamérica. Su destino final era Panamá, en un primer momento, y posteriormente Costa Rica, agrega el documento.

La información extraída de los GPS instalados en seis vehículos en que se movilizaban establece posición en Hidalgo y como destino final la localidad de Aserri, en Costa Rica.

Hay igualmente registros de estancia en varios estados mexicanos y en las localidades hondureñas de Santa Barbara, Gualioco, Siguatepeque (Comayagua) y Danlí; en las nicaragüenses Las Manos, Estelí, Managua, Nandaime y Peñas Blancas, así como en Liberia y Heredia, en Costa Rica.

Detenidos en posesión de 9.2 millones de dólares el 20 de agosto en el puesto de Las Manos, en Nicaragua, son acusados por delitos de lavado de dinero, asociación al crimen organizado y tráfico internacional de droga



MANAGUA.- Raquel Alatorrre sigue demostrando su liderazgo natural en el seno del grupo de 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua. Minutos después de concluir la audiencia preparatoria del juicio, que se celebró el viernes 9 en el juzgado noveno penal de Managua, la mujer de edad misteriosa, de baja estatura y cintura de avispa, se acercó a consolar y dar aliento a dos compañeros que sollozaban en silencio.


En la semana que termina, el caso de los 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua cuando transportaban 9.2 millones de dólares de origen desconocido en camionetas con logotipos de Televisa rebasó ya el simple encono mediático-profesional entre Televisa y Carmen Aristegui. Mientras la televisora busca ahora atribuir a motivaciones empresariales sus reportes sobre el caso difundidos en el espacio radiofónico de MVS, ella aclara: “Se quiere desacreditar a la periodista para desacreditar el todo”. En un virulento comunicado, la empresa de Emilio Azcárraga Jean optó de plano por descalificar las documentadas investigaciones de Aristegui con un simple calificativo: ella “miente”.


Caso Televisa-Nicaragua: muchas preguntas abiertas

A más de dos meses de la detención de 18 mexicanos que viajaban en seis vehículos con logotipos de Televisa, en una garita fronteriza de Nicaragua, el caso sigue siendo una incógnita.

El grupo, que viajó desde México a Costa Rica y regresaba vía Nicaragua, fue detenido el 20 de agosto. A bordo de los vehículos, la Policía Nacional nicaragüense encontró ocultos en compartimentos y maletas 9.2 millones de dólares en efectivo (que según la policía contenían restos de cocaína). Por estos hechos, el ministerio público nicaragüense abrió una investigación.

Desde los primeros días, los mexicanos detenidos declararon ser empleados de Televisa. Durante semanas lo han reiterado. La empresa lo niega.

Antes que la empresa, el gobierno mexicano, a través del embajador de México en Nicaragua, Rodrigo Labardini, declaró ante la autoridad ministerial que las personas detenidas "no eran de Televisa". En el mismo sentido se ha pronunciado Marisela Morales, titular de la PGR. Sin embargo, la Cancillería y la PGR han reconocido que en ambos casos la fuente de información fue la propia televisora.

Televisa ha rechazado cualquier vínculo con los detenidos y con la propiedad de los seis vehículos confiscados en Nicaragua. Y lo ha reiterado varias veces a través de su noticiero estelar.

Noticias MVS investigó y documentó que las seis camionetas confiscadas no sólo tenían los logotipos de la empresa, sino que estaban bien equipadas para realizar transmisiones de televisión, y que las mismas fueron registradas ante la autoridad vehicular del Distrito Federal (Setravi) a nombre de "Televisa, SA
de CV".

La Procuraduría de Justicia capitalina informó el 1 de noviembre que el registro de esos vehículos no fue realizado por el apoderado legal de la empresa. Sin embargo, confirmó que en los expedientes de registro se presentaron todos los documentos necesarios para realizar el trámite y que todos son verdaderos (sólo uno es extemporáneo) y ninguno es falso.

¿Quién registró entonces los vehículos en Setravi? ¿Por qué y para qué?

El 7 de octubre, la revista Proceso publicó cartas que fueron encontradas en un fólder, en el interior de una de las camionetas. Las misivas supuestamente están firmadas por Amador Narcia Estrada, vicepresidente de Información Nacional de Televisa, y en ellas se pide a las autoridades de Nicaragua y Costa Rica que faciliten a los supuestos periodistas la realización de su trabajo.

Cuando ha sido aludido, Narcia sólo ha respondido vía Twitter: "Por supuesto, nada que ver con el tema de las camionetas de Nicaragua. Ya se ha dicho varias veces" (1 de octubre)

"Proceso miente otra vez. Dice que son mías unas cartas falsas: no es mi firma, el sello es apócrifo y esa 'Dirección' no existe en Televisa" (7 de octubre).

El 8 de noviembre Noticias MVS y el sitio nicaragüense de internet confidencial.com.ni publicaron que existen cartas similares con la firma "Narcia Estrada" dirigidas a autoridades de Honduras y de un estado mexicano.

Asimismo, la investigación reveló que en la agenda telefónica de Raquel Alatorre Correa, la líder del grupo, la Policía Nacional encontró contactos registrados como "Lic. Narcia Estrada" y "Oficina Televisa". Alatorre llamó al primero de esos números telefónicos el día de su detención.

El 26 de septiembre, el fiscal especial del Ministerio Público de Nicaragua, Armando Juárez, refirió que algunos de los detenidos intentaron comunicarse con "personal de Televisa" cuando fueron detenidos.

Varios de ellos aún reiteran que trabajaban para Televisa.

Los 18 mexicanos detenidos en Nicaragua están acusados de "narcotráfico, delincuencia organizada y lavado de dinero".

El juicio en su contra se inicia este viernes 9 de noviembre. Las autoridades de ese país han aclarado que "la relación de los detenidos con Televisa corresponde investigarla a las autoridades mexicanas".

Aún quedan muchas interrogantes: ¿Quiénes son los 18 mexicanos que integraban esta "caravana" de vehículos? ¿Para quién trabajan? ¿Por qué desde el principio declararon trabajar para Televisa? ¿Cuántas veces antes de ahora viajaron de México a Centroamérica en este tipo de vehículos? ¿Quiénes registraron las seis camionetas a nombre de la empresa?, ¿Quién tuvo acceso a documentos no apócrifos de la televisora y quién los presentó ante módulos de la Setravi? ¿Por qué las camionetas que no son de la televisora tienen equipos para transmisión televisiva? ¿A quiénes llamaron los detenidos en México?

presencia del narcotráfico en Centroamérica

Querétaro, México.- El aumento de la criminalidad y la presencia del narcotráfico en Centroamérica condiciona la relación entre los países de esa región y México, afirmó Laura Chinchilla, Presidenta de Costa Rica.»Claro que inevitablemente el…

Querétaro, México.- El aumento de la criminalidad y la presencia del narcotráfico en Centroamérica condiciona la relación entre los países de esa región y México, afirmó Laura Chinchilla, Presidenta de Costa Rica.
"Claro que inevitablemente el tema del narcotráfico y la criminalidad están condicionado mucho las relaciones", dijo en conferencia de prensa tras su participación en el arranque de la X Cumbre de Negocios, en la Ciudad de Querétaro.
Actualmente, el tema de seguridad ocupa un lugar importante en la agenda multilateral de los países centroamericanos y México, y la solución al problema no debe ser tomada de manera unilateral, mencionó.
"Nos alegra mucho el éxito que tuvo Colombia en el combate a los cárteles en su país, pero si bien ellos tuvieron éxito, hubo un desplazamiento de la criminalidad hacia México.
"Nosotros no queremos que el éxito que México tenga en el futuro frente a este problema provoque que se desplace la criminalidad hacia Centroamérica", subrayó.
Chinchilla destacó que mañana sostendrá una reunión con el Presidente electo, Enrique Peña Nieto, y uno de los temas será el combate al narcotráfico.
Indicó que es necesario comenzar a buscar soluciones distintas al problema, pues con la reciente aprobación del uso de mariguana con fines recreativos en algunas entidades de Estados Unidos está cambiando de paradigma.
"Es un escenario que, desde luego, nos obliga a revisar y ajustar políticas y a tener respuestas que por un lado sean más sensatas, que sean más compartidas en sus costos y que generen menos traumas que las políticas actuales han generado en nuestras naciones, que han puesto miles de vidas humanas para poder defender este problema", dijo.
Según la Mandataria, la presencia de los cárteles mexicanos en Costa Rica ha comenzado a sentirse con mayor fuerza y las aprehensiones y crímenes violentos relacionados con el narcotráfico han aumentado, y con ello se ha agravado el problema de sobrepoblación de las cárceles.
Chinchilla comentó que Costa Rica y el resto de los países centroamericanos, junto con México, son víctimas de una geopolítica perversa, ya que están ubicados entre los grandes centros de producción y el mayor mercado consumidor de drogas del mundo.
"Ese convoy de violencia y de corrupción amenaza la vida de los ciudadanos, pero también nuestra estabilidad institucional. Es un desafío mayúsculo que debemos enfrentar con una mezcla de determinación para atacar las fuerzas estructurales del problema y de una más balanceada distribución de costos", señaló.
Recalcó que el narcotráfico y la criminalidad que ha afectado a México y a los países centroamericanos invita a fortalecer a las instituciones para evitar un daño mayor.
Señaló que no se puede olvidar que el sufragio universal, como elemento legitimador de los gobiernos y gobernantes, no es suficiente, y se requiere de un esfuerzo para promover la seguridad y bienestar de la población.
La Mandataria centroamericana reconoció la fortaleza económica que ha mostrado América Latina durante y tras la crisis económica global, pues consideró que mientras que hay varios países en el mundo que sufren los estragos de la debacle económica, las naciones latinoamericanas disfrutan de los beneficios de la estabilidad y fortaleza de sus finanzas públicas logradas con años de disciplina.
Después de las serias dificultades que enfrentaron las economías latinoamericanas en los años ochenta y noventa, explicó, los gobiernos aprendieron a ser más responsables, a "apretarse el cinturón presupuestario", aumentar sus reservas y evitar las políticas públicas poco responsables.
Comentó que los países cuya inflación es de dos dígitos se cuentan con una mano, y aquellos que aún mantienen un control artificial de su tipo de cambio son todavía menos.
"América Latina aprendió; la lección fue dura, pero bien enseñada", dijo.