about origins of life

Now, research from UNC School of Medicine biochemist Charles Carter, PhD, appearing in the September 13 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, offers an intriguing new view on how life began. Carter’s work is based on lab experiments during which his team recreated ancient protein enzymes that likely played a vital role in helping […]

Now, research from UNC School of Medicine biochemist Charles Carter, PhD, appearing in the September 13 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, offers an intriguing new view on how life began. Carter’s work is based on lab experiments during which his team recreated ancient protein enzymes that likely played a vital role in helping create life on Earth. Carter’s finding flies in the face of the widely-held theory that Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) self-replicated without the aid of simple proteins and eventually led to life as we know it.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-assumptions-life.html#jCp

Quantum physics explanation for smell gains traction

By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News, Dallas http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12827893 The quantum details of a flower’s chemicals may make the difference to our noses Continue reading the main story Related Stories Protein reveals how insects smell Research aims for … Continue reading

By Jason Palmer
Science and technology reporter, BBC News, Dallas

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12827893

The quantum details of a flower’s chemicals may make the difference to our noses
Continue reading the main story
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The theory that our sense of smell has its basis in quantum physics events is gaining traction, say researchers.

The idea remains controversial, but scientists reporting at the American Physical Society meeting in Dallas, US, are slowly unpicking how it could work.

The key, they say, is tiny packets of energy, or quanta, lost by electrons.

Experiments using tiny wires show that as electrons move on proteins within the nose, odor molecules could absorb these quanta and thereby be detected.

If the theory is right, by extending these studies, an “electronic nose” superior to any chemical sensor could be devised.