Refugees

Fear and cowardice are not the way forward. ISIS has done terrible things but our reaction to them should not be to punish their victims.

Regardless of the machinations behind the current crisis in the Middle East, its effects will unsettle the whole World, including the US and Europe (http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-roots-of-the-migration-crisis-1441995372 ).

The Syrian refugee disaster presents a dilemma to the West.

A massive influx of refugees into any country compromises its social and economic stability but the crisis cannot be ignored in humanitarian and practical grounds.

Furthermore, the rise of religious fundamentalism (of all flavors: Christian, Muslim, or Jewish) is a treat to the long term viability of modern society.

Tolerance is an intractable term.  Should we tolerate the intolerant, the racist, or the violent? Who decides who’s who, who’s what? Words used in complex social situations have always a degree of double-speak; there is a disconnection between what we think we mean and our actual thinking.

Tolerance (http://www.tolerance.org/ ) is supposed to be about letting those different from us be themselves, but in practice is about pretending that we are different from ourselves. To always have a favorite football team as an essential part of our identity? Even in this limited sense, one has to be careful; it might not be healthful to display the wrong loyalty in the wrong bar.

Tolerance stems from a sated world. In times of plenty, we can afford to be kind to those who are different. We are less threatened when we are comfortable. If our 21st Century standard of living peaks—coincident with a peak in surplus energy (i.e., fossil fuels)—then we may not have the luxury of viewing our social progress as an irreversible ratchet. Hard times revive old tribal instincts: different is not welcome.

Robert Paxton says that fascism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascism )  is “a form of political behavior marked by obsessive preoccupation with community decline, humiliation, or victimhood and by compensatory cults of unity, energy, and purity, in which a mass-based party of committed nationalist militants, working in uneasy but effective collaboration with traditional elites, abandons democratic liberties and pursues with redemptive violence and without ethical or legal restraints goals of internal cleansing and external expansion.”

Yet, the conflict is not about religion nor race, but power (in the sociopathic sense) and resources. Human activity is not driven by justice but by power. In a way, justice is the right of the strong. One thing is rationalizations used to justify actions, and another, real social and psychological motives behind. These ulterior motives are not necessary explicit or even conscious.

All three religions   – Christianity, Judaism, and Islam – in conflict share the same core barbaric Bronze Age believes sated in the Hebrew Bible, and all pick and choose what’s convenient to their respective social order. Whether one is consider a Christian or a Muslim is more an accident of geography or ethnicity, than a reflection of actual belief.   That is, religion is mainly a marker of cultural identity.

The scourge of Islamic fundamentalism is a monster created by the same people crying wolf (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2014/08/18/the-islamic-state/ ).

Humans are social animals and it’s our natural instinct to be emphatic with others. It’s natural for us to bond by kinship. Unfortunately the same tribal instinct hampers our ability to recognize the essential and vital global brotherhood of man. We cling to nationality, religion, and many artificial walls we build around us that compromise our chances for long term survival (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2015/12/12/merry-xmas/ ).

We must overcome our fears and reach out for peace. To live or die together is the choice.

Fear and cowardice are not the way forward. ISIS has done terrible things but our reaction to them should not be to punish their victims.

Regardless of the machinations behind the current crisis in the Middle East, its effects will unsettle the whole World, including the US and Europe (http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-roots-of-the-migration-crisis-1441995372 ).

The Syrian refugee disaster presents a dilemma to the West.

A massive influx of refugees into any country compromises its social and economic stability but the crisis cannot be ignored in humanitarian and practical grounds.

Furthermore, the rise of religious fundamentalism (of all flavors: Christian, Muslim, or Jewish) is a treat to the long term viability of modern society.

Tolerance is an intractable term.  Should we tolerate the intolerant, the racist, or the violent? Who decides who’s who, who’s what? Words used in complex social situations have always a degree of double-speak; there is a disconnection between what we think we mean and our actual thinking.

Tolerance (http://www.tolerance.org/ ) is supposed to be about letting those different from us be themselves, but in practice is about pretending that we are different from ourselves. To always have a favorite football team as an essential part of our identity? Even in this limited sense, one has to be careful; it might not be healthful to display the wrong loyalty in the wrong bar.

Tolerance stems from a sated world. In times of plenty, we can afford to be kind to those who are different. We are less threatened when we are comfortable. If our 21st Century standard of living peaks—coincident with a peak in surplus energy (i.e., fossil fuels)—then we may not have the luxury of viewing our social progress as an irreversible ratchet. Hard times revive old tribal instincts: different is not welcome.

Robert Paxton says that fascism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascism )  is “a form of political behavior marked by obsessive preoccupation with community decline, humiliation, or victimhood and by compensatory cults of unity, energy, and purity, in which a mass-based party of committed nationalist militants, working in uneasy but effective collaboration with traditional elites, abandons democratic liberties and pursues with redemptive violence and without ethical or legal restraints goals of internal cleansing and external expansion.”

Yet, the conflict is not about religion nor race, but power (in the sociopathic sense) and resources. Human activity is not driven by justice but by power. In a way, justice is the right of the strong. One thing is rationalizations used to justify actions, and another, real social and psychological motives behind. These ulterior motives are not necessary explicit or even conscious.

All three religions   – Christianity, Judaism, and Islam – in conflict share the same core barbaric Bronze Age believes sated in the Hebrew Bible, and all pick and choose what’s convenient to their respective social order. Whether one is consider a Christian or a Muslim is more an accident of geography or ethnicity, than a reflection of actual belief.   That is, religion is mainly a marker of cultural identity.

The scourge of Islamic fundamentalism is a monster created by the same people crying wolf (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2014/08/18/the-islamic-state/ ).

Humans are social animals and it’s our natural instinct to be emphatic with others. It’s natural for us to bond by kinship. Unfortunately the same tribal instinct hampers our ability to recognize the essential and vital global brotherhood of man. We cling to nationality, religion, and many artificial walls we build around us that compromise our chances for long term survival (https://arnulfo.wordpress.com/2015/12/12/merry-xmas/ ).

We must overcome our fears and reach out for peace. To live or die together is the choice.

Kurdish YPG and PKK fighters

Published on Oct 15, 2015
An amazing documentary. War (ISIS, Syria, Iraq). An Israeli journalist visits Kurdish YPG and PKK fighters in Iraqi & Syrian Kurdistan – Interview with ISIS prisoners. How Kurdish female fighters became ISIS’ nightmare, the dismantling of Iraq and Syria as states as we knew them, and more. Please share.

Published on Oct 15, 2015
An amazing documentary. War (ISIS, Syria, Iraq). An Israeli journalist visits Kurdish YPG and PKK fighters in Iraqi & Syrian Kurdistan – Interview with ISIS prisoners. How Kurdish female fighters became ISIS’ nightmare, the dismantling of Iraq and Syria as states as we knew them, and more. Please share.

Flags

Published on Mar 12, 2014Video: Settler tries to take down Palestinian flag from roof of Hebron man; soldiers then order homeowner to take down flag himselfUploaded on Jan 31, 2010On 15 December 2009, settlers prevented Palestinian farmers from plantin…

Published on Mar 12, 2014
Video: Settler tries to take down Palestinian flag from roof of Hebron man; soldiers then order homeowner to take down flag himself

Uploaded on Jan 31, 2010
On 15 December 2009, settlers prevented Palestinian farmers from planting olive trees on the farmers land in Deir Nidham, north of Ramallah. Soldiers at the scene did nothing to prevent the harm to the Palestinians. Instead, they closed the area to all civilians, Palestinians and settlers.

More at http://www.btselem.org/english/video/…

Kaputt

Kaputt

Da Wikipedia, l’enciclopedia libera.
« Kaputt è un libro crudele. La sua crudeltà è la più straordinaria esperienza che io abbia tratto dallo spettacolo dell’Europa in questi anni di guerra. Tuttavia, fra i protagonisti di questo libro, la guerra non è che un personaggio secondario. Si potrebbe dire che ha solo un valore di pretesto, se i pretesti inevitabili non appartenessero all’ordine della fatalità. In Kaputt la guerra conta dunque come fatalità. Non v’entra in altro modo. Direi che v’entra non da protagonista, ma da spettatrice, in quello stesso senso in cui è spettatore un paesaggio. La guerra è il paesaggio oggettivo di questo libro. »
(Curzio Malaparte)
Kaputt
Autore Curzio Malaparte
1ª ed. originale 1944
Genere romanzo
Sottogenere autobiografia (parziale)
Lingua originale italiano
Kaputt è un libro scritto da Curzio Malaparte tra il 1941 ed il 1943. È difficile definirlo un romanzo[1] nel senso comune del termine: non ha uno sviluppo di trama prevedibile.
È piuttosto un insieme di episodi, in parte autobiografici, tenuti assieme dal riferimento alla cornice bellica in cui si dipana il racconto

Kaputt

Da Wikipedia, l’enciclopedia libera.
« Kaputt è un libro crudele. La sua crudeltà è la più straordinaria esperienza che io abbia tratto dallo spettacolo dell’Europa in questi anni di guerra. Tuttavia, fra i protagonisti di questo libro, la guerra non è che un personaggio secondario. Si potrebbe dire che ha solo un valore di pretesto, se i pretesti inevitabili non appartenessero all’ordine della fatalità. In Kaputt la guerra conta dunque come fatalità. Non v’entra in altro modo. Direi che v’entra non da protagonista, ma da spettatrice, in quello stesso senso in cui è spettatore un paesaggio. La guerra è il paesaggio oggettivo di questo libro. »
(Curzio Malaparte)
Kaputt
Autore Curzio Malaparte
1ª ed. originale 1944
Genere romanzo
Sottogenere autobiografia (parziale)
Lingua originale italiano
Kaputt è un libro scritto da Curzio Malaparte tra il 1941 ed il 1943. È difficile definirlo un romanzo[1] nel senso comune del termine: non ha uno sviluppo di trama prevedibile.
È piuttosto un insieme di episodi, in parte autobiografici, tenuti assieme dal riferimento alla cornice bellica in cui si dipana il racconto

?? ??

Dr. Jiro Horikoshi (堀越 二郎 Horikoshi Jirō?, 22 June 1903 – 11 January 1982) was the chief engineer of many Japanese fighterdesigns of World War II, including the Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter.

Despite Mitsubishi’s close ties to the Japanese military establishment and his direct participation in the nation’s buildup towards the Second World War, Horikoshi was strongly opposed to what he regarded as a futile war. Excerpts from his personal diary during the final year of the war were published in 1956 and made his position clear:
When we awoke on the morning of December 8, 1941, we found ourselves — without any foreknowledge — to be embroiled in war…Since then, the majority of us who had truly understood the awesome industrial strength of the United States never really believed that Japan would win this war. We were convinced that surely our government had in mind some diplomatic measures which would bring the conflict to a halt before the situation became catastrophic for Japan. But now, bereft of any strong government move to seek a diplomatic way out, we are being driven to doom. Japan is being destroyed. I cannot do [anything] other but to blame the military hierarchy and the blind politicians in power for dragging Japan into this hellish cauldron of defeat.[2]
On 7 December 1944, a powerful earthquake in the Tokai region forced Mitsubishi to halt aircraft production at its plant in Ohimachi, Nagoya. An air raid made by B-29s on the Mitsubishi Engine Works in Daiko-cho, Nagoya a week later caused extensive damage to the works and a severe setback in production. Horikoshi, who had been at a conference in Tokyo with Imperial Navy officers to discuss the newReppu fighter, returned to Nagoya on the 17th, in time to experience another air raid on the Mitsubishi factories the next day. As a result of the air raid, the company evacuated its machinery and engineers to the suburbs of eastern Nagoya. Horikoshi and the Engineering Department were rehoused in a school building which had been requisitioned. Exhausted and overworked, Horikoshi fell ill with pleurisy on 25 December and remained bedridden through early April. During this time, he recorded in detail the horrors of the increasing air raids on Tokyo and Nagoya, including the devastating Operation Meetinghouse Tokyo incendiary raid of 9-10 March. A massive air raid on Nagoya the following night, with B-29s hurling “tens of thousands of incendiary bombs,” destroyed most of the largely wooden city. On 12 March, Horikoshi sent most of his family, including his elderly mother, children and brother-in-law, to his home village near Takasaki to be safe from the bombings, though his wife remained with him in Nagoya.
The Wind Rises (風立ちぬ Kaze Tachinu?) is a 2013 Japanese animated historical drama film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, and is animated by Studio Ghibli. It was the final film directed by Miyazaki before his retirement in September 2013.[5] The film is a fictionalized biography of Jiro Horikoshi (1903–1982), designer of the Mitsubishi A5M and its successor, the Mitsubishi A6M Zero; both aircraft were used by the Empire of Japan during World War II. The film is adapted from Miyazaki’s manga of the same name, which was in turn loosely based on the 1937 short story The Wind Has Risen by Tatsuo Hori.[6]
The Wind Has Risen (風立ちぬ – Kaze Tachinu)is a Japanese novel by Hori Tatsuo, written between 1936-37. It is set in a tuberculosis sanitarium in Nagano, Japan. The plot follows the condition of the female character’s illness. It was originally serialised in Kaizō.
The title is a quote from Paul Valéry‘s poem “Le Cimetière marin”.[1]
Three films have been produced based on the story. Most recently, Hayao Miyazaki‘s 2013 film, Kaze Tachinu, is loosely based on the novel.
 

Dr. Jiro Horikoshi (?? ?? Horikoshi Jir??, 22 June 1903 – 11 January 1982) was the chief engineer of many Japanese fighterdesigns of World War II, including the Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter.

Despite Mitsubishi’s close ties to the Japanese military establishment and his direct participation in the nation’s buildup towards the Second World War, Horikoshi was strongly opposed to what he regarded as a futile war. Excerpts from his personal diary during the final year of the war were published in 1956 and made his position clear:
When we awoke on the morning of December 8, 1941, we found ourselves — without any foreknowledge — to be embroiled in war…Since then, the majority of us who had truly understood the awesome industrial strength of the United States never really believed that Japan would win this war. We were convinced that surely our government had in mind some diplomatic measures which would bring the conflict to a halt before the situation became catastrophic for Japan. But now, bereft of any strong government move to seek a diplomatic way out, we are being driven to doom. Japan is being destroyed. I cannot do [anything] other but to blame the military hierarchy and the blind politicians in power for dragging Japan into this hellish cauldron of defeat.[2]
On 7 December 1944, a powerful earthquake in the Tokai region forced Mitsubishi to halt aircraft production at its plant in Ohimachi, Nagoya. An air raid made by B-29s on the Mitsubishi Engine Works in Daiko-cho, Nagoya a week later caused extensive damage to the works and a severe setback in production. Horikoshi, who had been at a conference in Tokyo with Imperial Navy officers to discuss the newReppu fighter, returned to Nagoya on the 17th, in time to experience another air raid on the Mitsubishi factories the next day. As a result of the air raid, the company evacuated its machinery and engineers to the suburbs of eastern Nagoya. Horikoshi and the Engineering Department were rehoused in a school building which had been requisitioned. Exhausted and overworked, Horikoshi fell ill with pleurisy on 25 December and remained bedridden through early April. During this time, he recorded in detail the horrors of the increasing air raids on Tokyo and Nagoya, including the devastating Operation Meetinghouse Tokyo incendiary raid of 9-10 March. A massive air raid on Nagoya the following night, with B-29s hurling “tens of thousands of incendiary bombs,” destroyed most of the largely wooden city. On 12 March, Horikoshi sent most of his family, including his elderly mother, children and brother-in-law, to his home village near Takasaki to be safe from the bombings, though his wife remained with him in Nagoya.
The Wind Rises (???? Kaze Tachinu?) is a 2013 Japanese animated historical drama film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, and is animated by Studio Ghibli. It was the final film directed by Miyazaki before his retirement in September 2013.[5] The film is a fictionalized biography of Jiro Horikoshi (1903–1982), designer of the Mitsubishi A5M and its successor, the Mitsubishi A6M Zero; both aircraft were used by the Empire of Japan during World War II. The film is adapted from Miyazaki’s manga of the same name, which was in turn loosely based on the 1937 short story The Wind Has Risen by Tatsuo Hori.[6]
The Wind Has Risen (???? – Kaze Tachinu?is a Japanese novel by Hori Tatsuo, written between 1936-37. It is set in a tuberculosis sanitarium in Nagano, Japan. The plot follows the condition of the female character’s illness. It was originally serialised in Kaiz?.
The title is a quote from Paul Valéry‘s poem “Le Cimetière marin”.[1]
Three films have been produced based on the story. Most recently, Hayao Miyazaki‘s 2013 film, Kaze Tachinu, is loosely based on the novel.
 

Unter falscher Flagge

Während die Amerikaner verhältnismäßig schnell mit gefälschten Beweisen zuerst Afghanistan und später den Irak angreifen, wächst der Zweifel an der offiziellen Version des 11. Septembers. Was unmittelbar nach den Anschlägen an Spekulationen im Internet kursierte, galt bisher als wilde Verschwörungstheorie. Doch die Indizien und sogar Beweise zeichnen ein deutliches Bild. Nicht islamische Terroristen, sondern einige ranghohe Militärs und Politiker der US-Regierung selbst, scheinen für die schrecklichen Anschläge verantwortlich zu sein.

Bei Verlinkung bitte Quelle angeben: http://www.NuoViso.TV

Während die Amerikaner verhältnismäßig schnell mit gefälschten Beweisen zuerst Afghanistan und später den Irak angreifen, wächst der Zweifel an der offiziellen Version des 11. Septembers. Was unmittelbar nach den Anschlägen an Spekulationen im Internet kursierte, galt bisher als wilde Verschwörungstheorie. Doch die Indizien und sogar Beweise zeichnen ein deutliches Bild. Nicht islamische Terroristen, sondern einige ranghohe Militärs und Politiker der US-Regierung selbst, scheinen für die schrecklichen Anschläge verantwortlich zu sein.

Bei Verlinkung bitte Quelle angeben: http://www.NuoViso.TV