Deep learning

Software libraries https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_deep_learning_software Main article: Comparison of deep learning software Deeplearning4j — An open-source deep-learning library written for Java/C++ with LSTMs and convolutional networks. It provides parallelization with Spark on CPUs and GPUs. Gensim — A toolkit for natural language processing implemented in the Python programming language. Keras — An open-source deep learning framework for … Continue reading «Deep learning»

Software libraries

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_deep_learning_software

  • Deeplearning4j — An open-source deep-learning library written for Java/C++ with LSTMs and convolutional networks. It provides parallelization with Spark on CPUs and GPUs.
  • Gensim — A toolkit for natural language processing implemented in the Python programming language.
  • Keras — An open-source deep learning framework for the Python programming language.
  • Microsoft CNTK (Computational Network Toolkit) — Microsoft’s open-source deep-learning toolkit for Windows and Linux. It provides parallelization with CPUs and GPUs across multiple servers.
  • MXNet — An open source deep learning framework that allows you to define, train, and deploy deep neural networks.
  • OpenNN — An open source C++ library which implements deep neural networks and provides parallelization with CPUs.
  • PaddlePaddle — An open source C++ /CUDA library with Python API for scalable deep learning platform with CPUs and GPUs, originally developed by Baidu.
  • TensorFlow — Google’s open source machine learning library in C++ and Python with APIs for both. It provides parallelization with CPUs and GPUs.
  • Theano — An open source machine learning library for Python supported by the University of Montreal and Yoshua Bengio’s team.
  • Torch — An open source software library for machine learning based on the Lua programming language and used by Facebook.
  • Caffe – Caffe is a deep learning framework made with expression, speed, and modularity in mind. It is developed by the Berkeley Vision and Learning Center (BVLC) and by community contributors.
  • DIANNE – A modular open-source deep learning framework in Java / OSGi developed at Ghent University, Belgium. It provides parallelization with CPUs and GPUs across multiple servers.

Chicago Transims Evacuation

Uploaded on Jun 23, 2011
A collection of clips showcasing the downtown Chicago buildings, a normal day case simulation at 20% load, and a preliminary evacuation from the area (Evacuees are the purple cars).

Uploaded on Jun 23, 2011
A collection of clips showcasing the downtown Chicago buildings, a normal day case simulation at 20% load, and a preliminary evacuation from the area (Evacuees are the purple cars).

Anki

Anki is a program which makes remembering things easy. Because it’s a lot more efficient than traditional study methods, you can either greatly decrease your time spent studying, or greatly increase the amount you learn. Anyone who needs to remember things in their daily life can benefit from Anki. Since it is content-agnostic and supports … Continue reading Anki

Anki is a program which makes remembering things easy. Because it’s a lot more efficient than traditional study methods, you can either greatly decrease your time spent studying, or greatly increase the amount you learn.

Anyone who needs to remember things in their daily life can benefit from Anki. Since it is content-agnostic and supports images, audio, videos and scientific markup (via LaTeX), the possibilities are endless.
For example:

  • Learning a language
  • Studying for medical and law exams
  • Memorizing people’s names and faces
  • Brushing up on geography
  • Mastering long poems
  • Even practicing guitar chords!

Tor

Tor is free software for enabling anonymous communication. The name is an acronym derived from the original software project name The Onion Router,[7] however the correct spelling is “Tor”, capitalizing only the first letter.[8] Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer network consisting of more than seven thousand relays[9] to conceal a user’s … Continue reading Tor

Tor is free software for enabling anonymous communication. The name is an acronym derived from the original software project name The Onion Router,[7] however the correct spelling is “Tor”, capitalizing only the first letter.[8] Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer network consisting of more than seven thousand relays[9] to conceal a user’s location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Using Tor makes it more difficult for Internet activity to be traced back to the user: this includes “visits to Web sites, online posts, instant messages, and other communication forms”.[10] Tor’s use is intended to protect the personal privacy of users, as well as their freedom and ability to conduct confidential communication by keeping their Internet activities from being monitored.

Onion routing is implemented by encryption in the application layer of a communication protocol stack, nested like the layers of anonion. Tor encrypts the data, including the destination IP address, multiple times and sends it through a virtual circuit comprising successive, randomly selected Tor relays. Each relay decrypts a layer of encryption to reveal only the next relay in the circuit in order to pass the remaining encrypted data on to it. The final relay decrypts the innermost layer of encryption and sends the original data to its destination without revealing, or even knowing, the source IP address. Because the routing of the communication is partly concealed at every hop in the Tor circuit, this method eliminates any single point at which the communicating peers can be determined through network surveillance that relies upon knowing its source and destination.

An adversary might try to de-anonymize the user by some means. One way this may be achieved is by exploiting vulnerable software on the user’s computer.[11] The NSA has a technique that targets outdated Firefox browsers codenamed EgotisticalGiraffe,[12] and targets Tor users in general for close monitoring under its XKeyscore program.[13] Attacks against Tor are an active area of academic research,[14][15] which is welcomed by the Tor Project itself.[16]

Leonardo Sticks

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) invented a great many machines to do an extraordinary number of things. On two pages of sketches Leonardo described a roofing system for spanning large areas without internal support. He shows wooden beams laced together in a particular way so that they are self-supporting, and says this idea can be used to […]

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) invented a great many machines to do an extraordinary number of things. On two pages of sketches Leonardo described a roofing system for spanning large areas without internal support. He shows wooden beams laced together in a particular way so that they are self-supporting, and says this idea can be used to cover a space without internal support, quickly and simply without complicated joints or special tools. The structures are shallow domes that are built starting from a center, supporting themselves on the ends of new sticks added to the edges. Leonardo says that the beams should be tied together with ropes and covered with strips of woven wool. He probably had in mind a shady cover for a space like a marketplace or military camp. There is no record that any of them were ever built.
In 1989 Dutch sculptor Rinus Roelofs was working on ways to divide a sphere and found a system that was simple and elegant. He recognized that in addition to dividing a sphere into solid pieces, he could also make the joints of that division into wooden sticks that interlaced to form the sphere. He invented sticks with two notches to help with alignment. They didn’t need to be tied together as Leonardo’s beams did: their weight alone held them in place.