el héroe de Tigre

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2010
Un joven que circulaba como acompañante en una motocicleta salvó la vida del conductor de una camioneta que quedó atascada sobre las vías del ferrocarril.

El paso a nivel donde se produjo el increíble suceso está ubicado sobre la calle Perú en el límite de las localidades de General Pacheco y El Talar, ambas del partido de Tigre.

La camioneta Fiorino blanca, al igual que otro imprudente automovilista, esquivó la barrera que se encontraba baja y al querer cruzar se le detuvo el motor justo sobre las vías.

La moto con los 2 hombres miraba la situación atentamente. La camioneta parece que arranca pero se vuelve a quedar y uno de los hombres, el héroe de Tigre, se baja y empuja increíblemente la camioneta hacia el otro lado arriesgando su vida por este automovilista inconsciente que puso en riesgo su propia vida y la de terceros.

El tren casi lo arrolla, salva su vida de milagro y queda, los primeros segundos, atónito ante la mirada de los ocasionales espectadores.

Se dio cuenta que volvió a vivir. Festeja con su amigo que lo abraza emocionadamente. Grita a los cuatro vientos Sí, fui yo, yo solito la empujé y lo salvé en lo que se asemeja al festejo de un gol en el fútbol argentino de primera división.

Hasta festeja con los pasajeros del tren.

El inconsciente y el héroe nunca se conocieron.

La cámara del Municipio de Tigre que registró la situación identificó al irrespetuoso automovilista quien es buscado intensamente por el Centro de Operaciones Tigre para que pague por su falta.

Más de 330 cámaras monitorean los diferentes puntos del partido de Tigre las cuales permiten que la Policía detenga delincuentes, detectar incendios y accidentes o bien registrar imágenes de imprudentes automovilistas y un héroe como en este caso.

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2010
Un joven que circulaba como acompañante en una motocicleta salvó la vida del conductor de una camioneta que quedó atascada sobre las vías del ferrocarril.

El paso a nivel donde se produjo el increíble suceso está ubicado sobre la calle Perú en el límite de las localidades de General Pacheco y El Talar, ambas del partido de Tigre.

La camioneta Fiorino blanca, al igual que otro imprudente automovilista, esquivó la barrera que se encontraba baja y al querer cruzar se le detuvo el motor justo sobre las vías.

La moto con los 2 hombres miraba la situación atentamente. La camioneta parece que arranca pero se vuelve a quedar y uno de los hombres, el héroe de Tigre, se baja y empuja increíblemente la camioneta hacia el otro lado arriesgando su vida por este automovilista inconsciente que puso en riesgo su propia vida y la de terceros.

El tren casi lo arrolla, salva su vida de milagro y queda, los primeros segundos, atónito ante la mirada de los ocasionales espectadores.

Se dio cuenta que volvió a vivir. Festeja con su amigo que lo abraza emocionadamente. Grita a los cuatro vientos Sí, fui yo, yo solito la empujé y lo salvé en lo que se asemeja al festejo de un gol en el fútbol argentino de primera división.

Hasta festeja con los pasajeros del tren.

El inconsciente y el héroe nunca se conocieron.

La cámara del Municipio de Tigre que registró la situación identificó al irrespetuoso automovilista quien es buscado intensamente por el Centro de Operaciones Tigre para que pague por su falta.

Más de 330 cámaras monitorean los diferentes puntos del partido de Tigre las cuales permiten que la Policía detenga delincuentes, detectar incendios y accidentes o bien registrar imágenes de imprudentes automovilistas y un héroe como en este caso.

Otis Johnson

Published on Nov 24, 2015
Otis Johnson went to jail at the age of 25. When he got out at 69, he rejoined a world that was starkly different from the one he remembered. This is his story.


Published on Nov 24, 2015
Otis Johnson went to jail at the age of 25. When he got out at 69, he rejoined a world that was starkly different from the one he remembered. This is his story.

Django Reinhardt

Published on Apr 18, 2012 Uniquely, Django Reinhardt fits several simultaneous archetypes. He is the streetwise kid turned celebrity. He is the miraculous surivor of an accident who went on to overcome his handicap. He is the illiterate who used … Continue reading

Published on Apr 18, 2012
Uniquely, Django Reinhardt fits several simultaneous archetypes. He is the streetwise kid turned celebrity. He is the miraculous surivor of an accident who went on to overcome his handicap. He is the illiterate who used musical notes as a universal language. He is the whimsical musician who defied every setback. Django was already a legend in his own lifetime, and this film tells of the life and times of a genius to whom death came too early. Yet another, final archetype. But above all it allows us to discover the dazzling talent of one of the greatest jazz guitarists of the twentieth century. Recorded in Paris and Île-de-France, 2010.

Bonus
“Anouman” played by David Reinhardt (guitar solo); “Anouman” played by David Reinhardt (trio formation); “All love” composed by Babik Reinhardt , played by David Reinhardt (guitar solo), Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Gra pelli playing “J’attendrai” in BBC Studios, London

JeanDjangoReinhardt[1][2] (French: [d?ã??o ??jna?t] or [d????o ?en??t]; 23 January 1910 – 16 May 1953) was a Belgium-born French guitarist and composer of Romani ethnicity.[3][4]

Reinhardt is regarded as one of the greatest guitar players of all time; he was the first important European jazz musician who made major contributions to the development of the guitar genre. After his fourth and fifth fingers were paralyzed when he suffered burns in a fire, Reinhardt used only the index and middle finger of his left hand on his solos. He created an entirely new style of jazz guitar technique (sometimes called ‘hot’ jazz guitar), which has since become a living musical tradition within French Gypsy culture. With violinist Stéphane Grappelli, Reinhardt co-founded the Quintette du Hot Club de France, described by critic Thom Jurek as “one of the most original bands in the history of recorded jazz”.[5] Reinhardt’s most popular compositions have become jazz standards, including “Minor Swing“, “Daphne”, “Belleville”, “Djangology”, “Swing ’42”, and “Nuages“.


The Middle Way

Buddhism is a nontheistic religion that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and practices largely based on teachings attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, who is commonly known as the Buddha, meaning “the awakened one”. According to Buddhist tradition, the Buddha lived … Continue reading


Buddhism is a nontheistic religion that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and practices largely based on teachings attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, who is commonly known as the Buddha, meaning “the awakened one”. According to Buddhist tradition, the Buddha lived and taught in the eastern part of the Indian subcontinent sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[1] He is recognized by Buddhists as an awakened or enlightened teacher who shared his insights to help sentient beings end their suffering through the elimination of craving and ignorance by way of understanding and the seeing of dependent origination, with the ultimate goal of attainment of the sublime state of nirvana.[2]

Two major branches of Buddhism are generally recognized: Theravada (“The School of the Elders”) and Mahayana (“The Great Vehicle”). Theravada has a widespread following in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar etc.). Mahayana is found throughout East Asia (China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Taiwan etc.) and includes the traditions of Pure Land, Zen, Nichiren Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism, Shingon, and Tiantai (Tendai). In some classifications, Vajrayana—practiced mainly in Tibet and Mongolia, and adjacent parts of China and Russia—is recognized as a third branch, while others classify it as a part of Mahayana.

While Buddhism is practiced primarily in Asia, both major branches are now found throughout the world. Estimates of Buddhists worldwide vary significantly depending on the way Buddhist adherence is defined. Estimates range from 350 million to 1.6 billion, with 350–550 million the most widely accepted figure. Buddhism is also recognized as one of the fastest growing religions in the world.[3][4][5][6]
Buddhist schools vary on the exact nature of the path to liberation, the importance and canonicity of various teachings and scriptures, and especially their respective practices.[7] The foundations of Buddhist tradition and practice are the Three Jewels: the Buddha, the Dharma (the teachings), and the Sangha (the community). Taking “refuge in the triple gem” has traditionally been a declaration and commitment to being on the Buddhist path, and in general distinguishes a Buddhist from a non-Buddhist.[8] Other practices may include following ethical precepts; support of the monastic community; renouncing conventional living and becoming a monastic; the development of mindfulness and practice of meditation; cultivation of higher wisdom and discernment; study of scriptures; devotional practices; ceremonies; and in the Mahayana tradition, invocation of buddhas and bodhisattvas.


The Four Noble Truths (Sanskrit: catv?ri ?ryasaty?ni; Pali: catt?ri ariyasacc?ni) are “the truths of the Noble Ones,” which express the basic orientation of Buddhism: this worldly existence is fundamentally unsatisfactory, but there is a path to liberation from repeated worldly existence. The truths are as follows:

  1. The Truth of Dukkha is that all conditional phenomena and experiences are not ultimately satisfying;
  2. The Truth of the Origin of Dukkha is that craving for and clinging to what is pleasurable and aversion to what is not pleasurable result in becoming, rebirth, dissatisfaction, and redeath;
  3. The Truth of the Cessation of Dukkha is that putting an end to this craving and clinging also means that rebirth, dissatisfaction, and redeath can no longer arise;
  4. The Truth of the Path Of Liberation from Dukkha is that by following the Noble Eightfold Path—namely, behaving decently, cultivating discipline, and practicing mindfulness and meditation—an end can be put to craving, to clinging, to becoming, to rebirth, to dissatisfaction, and to redeath.

The four truths provide a useful conceptual framework for making sense of Buddhist thought, which has to be personally understood or “experienced.” Many Buddhist teachers present them as the essence of Buddhist teachings, though this importance developed over time, substituting older notions of what constitutes prajna, or “liberating insight.”[1][2]

In the sutras the four truths have both a symbolic and a propositional function. They represent the awakening and liberation of the Buddha, but also the possibility of liberation for all sentient beings, describing how release from craving is to be reached.

The first noble truth is the truth of dukkha.[note 17] It gives an overview of what is regarded to be dukkha, starting with samsara, the ongoing process of death and rebirth:[citation needed]

  1. Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, illness is dukkha, death is dukkha;
  2. Sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, & despair are dukkha;
  3. Association with the unbeloved is dukkha; separation from the loved is dukkha;
  4. Not getting what is wanted is dukkha.
  5. In conclusion, the five clinging-aggregates are dukkha.

The Dukkhata Sutta, Samyutta Nikaya 45.165,[web 13][web 14] describes three kinds of dukkhataa, suffering in the most general sense:[web 13][note 18]

  1. Dukkha-dukkhataa, “the actual feeling of physical or mental pain or anguish”,[web 13] “response to unpleasant physical or mental experiences”;[web 14]
  2. Sa?kh?ra-dukkhataa, “the suffering produced by all ‘conditioned phenomena’”;[note 19][note 20] “craving for things to be how we want them to be.”[web 14] It is a basic unsatisfactoriness pervading all forms of existence, due to ignorance of the fact that all forms of life are changing, impermanent and without any inner core or substance. It is a lack of satisfaction, a sense that things never measure up to our expectations or standards.
  3. Vipari??ma-dukkhataa, “the suffering associated with pleasant bodily and mental feelings: “because they are the cause for the arising of pain when they change”,[web 13]“when we’re enjoying a pleasant experience, we crave for it to continue […] inevitably, the universal law of impermanence leaves that craving unsatisfied.”[web 14]

Majjhima Nikaya 149:3 gives a concise description of dukkha:

When one abides inflamed by lust, fettered, infatuated, contemplating gratification, […] [o]ne’s bodily and mental troubles increase, one’s bodily and mental torments increase, one’s bodily and mental fevers increase, and one experiences bodily and mental suffering.[23]

From a Buddhist perspective, labelling Buddhism as “a bleak, pessimistic and world-denying philosophy,” as some commentators have done, “may reflect a deep-seated refusal to accept the reality of dukkha itself.”[24]


The Noble Eightfold Path (Pali: ariyo a??ha?giko maggo, Sanskrit: ?ry?????gam?rga)[1] is one of the principal teachings of?r?vakay?na. It is used to develop insight into the true nature of phenomena (or reality) and to eradicate greed, hatred, and delusion. The Noble Eightfold Path is the fourth of the Buddha’s Four Noble Truths; the first element of the Noble Eightfold Path is, in turn, an understanding of the Four Noble Truths. It is also known as the Middle Path or Middle Way. Its goal is Arhatship.[2] The Noble Eightfold Path is contrasted with the Bodhisattva path of Mahayana which culminates in Buddhahood.[3]

All eight elements of the Path begin with the word “right,” which translates the word samyañc (in Sanskrit) or samm? (in P?li). These denote completion, togetherness, and coherence, and can also suggest the senses of “perfect” or “ideal.”[4] ‘Samma’ is also translated as “wholesome,” “wise” and “skillful.”

In Buddhist symbolism, the Noble Eightfold Path is often represented by means of the dharma wheel (dharmachakra), whose eight spokes represent the eight elements of the path.

The Noble Eightfold Path is sometimes divided into three basic divisions, as follows:[11][12]

Division Eightfold Path factors Acquired factors
Wisdom (Sanskrit: prajñ?, P?li: paññ?) 1. Right view 9. Superior right knowledge
2. Right intention 10. Superior right liberation
Ethical conduct (Sanskrit: ??la, P?li: s?la) 3. Right speech
4. Right action
5. Right livelihood
Concentration (Sanskrit and P?li: sam?dhi) 6. Right effort
7. Right mindfulness
8. Right concentration

This presentation is called the “Three Higher Trainings” in Mah?y?na Buddhism: higher moral discipline, higher concentration and higher wisdom. “Higher” here refers to the fact that these trainings that lead to liberation and enlightenment are engaged in with the motivation of renunciation or bodhicitta.


The Way of Zen

The Way of Zen begins as a succinct guide through the histories of Buddhism and Taoism leading up to the development of Zen Buddhism, which drew deeply from both traditions. It then goes on to paint a broad but insightful picture of Zen as it was and is practiced, both as a religion and as an element of diverse East Asian arts and disciplines. Watts’s narrative clears away the mystery while enhancing the mystique of Zen.

Since the first publication of this book in 1957, Zen Buddhism has become firmly established in the West. As Zen has taken root in Western soil, it has incorporated much of the attitude and approach set forth by Watts in The Way of Zen, which remains one of the most important introductory books in Western Zen

Barbara Fredrickson

Published on Jan 10, 2014 Dr. Fredrickson is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Principal Investigator of the Positive Emotions and Psychophysiology Lab at the University of North Carolina. She is a leading scholar within social psychology, affective science, … Continue reading

Published on Jan 10, 2014
Dr. Fredrickson is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Principal Investigator of the Positive Emotions and Psychophysiology Lab at the University of North Carolina. She is a leading scholar within social psychology, affective science, and positive psychology. Her research centers on positive emotions and human flourishing and is supported by grants from the National Institute of Health. Her research and her teaching have been recognized with numerous honors, including the 2000 American Psychological Association’s Templeton Prize in Positive Psychology.

Her work is cited widely and she is regularly invited to give keynotes nationally and internationally. She lives in Chapel Hill with her husband and two sons. Barbara is the author of Positivity and Love 2.0: How Our Supreme Emotion Affects Everything We Feel, Think, Do, and Become.




Eudaimonia

Eudaimonia (Greek: εὐδαιμονία [eu̯dai̯moníaː]), sometimes anglicized as eudaemonia or eudemonia /juːdɨˈmoʊniə/, is a Greek word commonly translated as happiness orwelfare; however, “human flourishing” has been proposed as a more accurate translation.[1] Etymologically, it consists of the words “eu” (“good”) and … Continue reading

Eudaimonia (Greek: ?????????? [eu?dai?monía?]), sometimes anglicized as eudaemonia or eudemonia /ju?d??mo?ni?/, is a Greek word commonly translated as happiness orwelfare; however, “human flourishing” has been proposed as a more accurate translation.[1] Etymologically, it consists of the words “eu” (“good”) and “daim?n” (“spirit”). It is a central concept in Aristotelian ethics and political philosophy, along with the terms “aret?“, most often translated as “virtue” or “excellence”, and “phronesis“, often translated as “practical or ethical wisdom”.[2] In Aristotle’s works, eudaimonia was (based on older Greek tradition) used as the term for the highest human good, and so it is the aim of practical philosophy, including ethics and political philosophy, to consider (and also experience) what it really is, and how it can be achieved.

Discussion of the links between virtue of character (ethik? aret?) and happiness (eudaimonia) is one of the central concerns of ancient ethics, and a subject of much disagreement. As a result there are many varieties of eudaimonism. Two of the most influential forms are those of Aristotle[3] and the Stoics. Aristotle takes virtue and its exercise to be the most important constituent in eudaimonia but acknowledges also the importance of external goods such as health, wealth, and beauty. By contrast, the Stoics make virtue necessary and sufficient for eudaimonia and thus deny the necessity of external goods.