China-Mexico connection

Published on Feb 12, 2015 China is fueling meth addiction by supplying precursor chemicals to drug lords and gangs around the world. These basic chemical ingredients can be used to make Methamphetamine, and have fed a growing drug problem in … Continue reading

Published on Feb 12, 2015
China is fueling meth addiction by supplying precursor chemicals to drug lords and gangs around the world. These basic chemical ingredients can be used to make Methamphetamine, and have fed a growing drug problem in the United States through Mexican drug cartels. In recent years, Chinese authorities have launched several high-profile drug busts. But authorities are also looking the other way, or in some cases, are directly involved in synthetic drug trade. On this episode of China Uncensored, here are 11 ways that the Chinese Communist Party is breaking bad.

Under The Dome

The Pollution Documentary China’s Government Doesn’t Want You To See [Stuff to Watch] On 13th March, 2015 Web Culture The film was watched more than 100 million times in the first 24 hours alone.Chinese authorities started removing the film from Chinese video … Continue reading

The Pollution Documentary China’s Government Doesn’t Want You To See [Stuff to Watch]

The film was watched more than 100 million times in the first 24 hours alone.Chinese authorities started removing the film from Chinese video hosting services, shortly before the full English translation landed on YouTube. A leaked directive from the Chinese government even orders the media not to report on the film. 

Under The Dome

Simply called Under The Dome — a reference to the cocoon of carcinogens that enshrines many of China’s largest urbanised environments — the documentary is the work of former China Central Television host and respected investigative reporter, Chai Jing.

The documentary was an entirely self-funded affair, and came to being once Chai discovered that her unborn child had a tumour (which was removed shortly after birth) — something she attributes to poor air quality. What follows is a brutally honest glimpse into how China is losing the war on pollution.


Donald Trump

there is one candidate in this Democratic primary who Donald Trump said would make a “great president,” and it’s not Bernie Sanders. Bernie is going to fight through the narrow path we have to the nomination because there is also … Continue reading

there is one candidate in this Democratic primary who Donald Trump said would make a “great president,” and it’s not Bernie Sanders.

Bernie is going to fight through the narrow path we have to the nomination because there is also only one candidate who believes health care should be a right for everyone in this country, that kids of all backgrounds should be able to go to college without crushing debt, and that we cannot transform a corrupt system by taking its money.

Can Bernie count on you to contribute $3 to our campaign right now as a way of saying you are still with Bernie Sanders and believe that every vote and every delegate is an important declaration of support for the values we share?

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Donald Trump’s hammering away at questions of Cruz’s eligibility, given that he was born to his American citizen mother while she was living in Canada, “Trump may have something” when he levels the question about Cruz’s eligibility.

Trump might get traction out of reminding Iowa Republicans that Cruz’s given name is Rafael, which, apparently, is too “ethnic-sounding” for provincial “homeschooled” Midwestern conservatives.

– See more at: http://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/nb/ken-shepherd/2016/01/11/chris-matthews-wont-iowa-republicans-reject-canada-born-rafael-cruz#sthash.ZYe26aDO.dpuf

If national polls are to be believed, then come November, we could face the largest wave of Republican voters in decades.

Is she going to vote for Trump?
Continuar leyendo “Donald Trump”

Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb

Published on Mar 26, 2015 Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee. The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic … Continue reading

Published on Mar 26, 2015
Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee.

The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic rise, and its emergence as a regional peer of America’s in military terms is all but assured. Such a belief underpins arguments that a fundamental strategic reorganisation of Asia is inevitable, and that it will be necessary and perhaps even desirable to concede to China significant ‘strategic space’. Dependent largely on linear extrapolations about the future, such arguments ignore the implications of China’s economic, social and national fragilities, its lack of major friends or allies in the region as well as the considerable military deficiencies and challenges faced by the People’s Liberation Army. With the Defence White Paper due for release in 2015, the government should bear in mind that planning for an era of Chinese dominance in the region—or even its emergence as an American strategic peer in Asia—would be premature if not improbable. Australia should not design its defence force for war with China, but it should be able to counter Chinese coercion and contribute to Allied military operations if necessary.

Paul Dibb is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies in the Strategic & Defence Studies Centre, Coral Bell schol of Asia-Pacific Affairs, ANU. He was head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre from 1991 to 2004. Before that he held the positions of deputy secretary for Defence, director of the Joint Intelligence Organisation and head of the National Assessments Staff. He studied the former Soviet Union for over 20 years both as a senior intelligence officer and academic. He advised ASIO on certain Soviet activities. His book The Soviet Union–the Incomplete Superpower was published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies , London in 1986, reprinted 1987 and second edition 1988.

John Lee is an Australian academic working on international economic and security affairs with a focus on the Asia-Pacific. Lee is an adjunct associate professor at the Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, a Michael Hintze Fellow at the Centre for International Security Studies, University of Sydney and a senior scholar at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. Lee is a board member of the Institute for Regional Security.

China’s Ruthless Crackdown On Its Muslim Population

Published on Oct 1, 2014 Crackdown: The report on Uigher protests that broke relations between China and Australia Xinjiang province has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the Uighur population and Chinese rule. Amid fears that fanatical Uighurs … Continue reading

Published on Oct 1, 2014
Crackdown: The report on Uigher protests that broke relations between China and Australia

Xinjiang province has long been the site of ethnic tensions between the Uighur population and Chinese rule. Amid fears that fanatical Uighurs are aligning with foreign extremists, the state crackdown is fiercer than ever.

“A normal person wouldn’t raise a butcher’s knife to the elderly and children. Can we still call them human beings?”, asks policeman Ainiding Memtimin. In May he was on the scene when a group of extremists threw explosives into a busy Urumqi marketplace, killing 39 people. A Uighur himself, like most locals he is baffled by such drastic violent acts. Yet the tensions that have simmered in this region are sitting on a knife edge. “Injustice is everywhere here, but we can’t talk about it”, says one Uighur farmer in a snatched interview. On Xinjiang’s highways, cars are now being stopped for full airport-style security checks. The government keeps a close eye on religious institutions and veils for women and beards for men are actively discouraged. Teaching in the Uighur language is disappearing in schools and it’s almost non-existent at universities. And it isn’t just the Uighurs feeling the crackdown; enormous numbers of Han Chinese have been pressed into the province to water down the Uighurs’ presence and influence. In some towns, payments are being offered for inter-marriage. But is China’s central government using a sledgehammer to crack a nut? This report doggedly pushes past the press restrictions and government minders to tackle this difficult question.

a mountain cannot have two tigers

Published on Mar 26, 2015 Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee. The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic … Continue reading

Published on Mar 26, 2015
Public Lecture by Emeritus Professor Paul Dibb and Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee.

The belief that China will soon become the dominant power in Asia is based on assumptions that its continued and rapid economic rise, and its emergence as a regional peer of America’s in military terms is all but assured. Such a belief underpins arguments that a fundamental strategic reorganisation of Asia is inevitable, and that it will be necessary and perhaps even desirable to concede to China significant ‘strategic space’. Dependent largely on linear extrapolations about the future, such arguments ignore the implications of China’s economic, social and national fragilities, its lack of major friends or allies in the region as well as the considerable military deficiencies and challenges faced by the People’s Liberation Army. With the Defence White Paper due for release in 2015, the government should bear in mind that planning for an era of Chinese dominance in the region—or even its emergence as an American strategic peer in Asia—would be premature if not improbable. Australia should not design its defence force for war with China, but it should be able to counter Chinese coercion and contribute to Allied military operations if necessary.

Paul Dibb is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies in the Strategic & Defence Studies Centre, Coral Bell schol of Asia-Pacific Affairs, ANU. He was head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre from 1991 to 2004. Before that he held the positions of deputy secretary for Defence, director of the Joint Intelligence Organisation and head of the National Assessments Staff. He studied the former Soviet Union for over 20 years both as a senior intelligence officer and academic. He advised ASIO on certain Soviet activities. His book The Soviet Union–the Incomplete Superpower was published by the International Institute for Strategic Studies , London in 1986, reprinted 1987 and second edition 1988.

John Lee is an Australian academic working on international economic and security affairs with a focus on the Asia-Pacific. Lee is an adjunct associate professor at the Australian National University’s Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, a Michael Hintze Fellow at the Centre for International Security Studies, University of Sydney and a senior scholar at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. Lee is a board member of the Institute for Regional Security.

Published on Oct 16, 2015
Is China’s ascendancy a threat to the U.S.? China’s rise as an economic and military power, coupled with its aggression in the South China Sea, have led some to call for a major rebalance of U.S. policy and strategy. Can China be trusted to act as a responsible global stakeholder? And will they be a long-term ally, or adversary?

Published on May 27, 2015
Sure China has the largest standing army in the world, with 2.3 million people, a military budget of 120 billion dollars, and experimental spider tanks. But it turns out that China’s People’s Liberation Army might not be as powerful as you think.

Published on Jul 29, 2015
Japan is pushing forward a controversial set of bills that China is saying will allow Japan to wage war on China. That would break the Potsdam Declaration and change Japan’s constitution, the one the United States made Japan sign after World War 2 banning Japan from having a military .

Simojovel

28 jun 2015 7:13 AM.
Por: Redacción – xeu Noticias

Empresarios de Corea, China y Taiwán llegaron hace dos años a Simojovel, Chiapas, a comprar piezas de ámbar rojo y amarillo, considerado el de mayor calidad y belleza, agotando así de este material precioso a minas de 25 millones de años de antigüedad, denuncian habitantes de este municipio.

El periódico El Universal publica este domingo un reportaje que muestra la forma en que los asiáticos se han llevado el ámbar chiapaneco de localidades como La Pimienta, una comunidad tzotzil de Simojovel, donde sus habitantes, niños y adultos, trabajan de siete de la mañana a tres de la tarde para extraerlo de las minas por sueldos sumamente bajos.

La publicación detalla que el ámbar generó una nueva forma de hacer negocio, desde la renta de minas de aproximadamente seis mil pesos mensuales para exportarlo a China, Corea y Taiwán en donde es vendido en más de 600 pesos cada piedra, el equivalente al gramo de oro de 24 quilates, según declaraciones de artesanos chiapanecos.

Fuente: El Universal/

28 jun 2015 7:13 AM.
Por: Redacción – xeu Noticias

Empresarios de Corea, China y Taiwán llegaron hace dos años a Simojovel, Chiapas, a comprar piezas de ámbar rojo y amarillo, considerado el de mayor calidad y belleza, agotando así de este material precioso a minas de 25 millones de años de antigüedad, denuncian habitantes de este municipio.

El periódico El Universal publica este domingo un reportaje que muestra la forma en que los asiáticos se han llevado el ámbar chiapaneco de localidades como La Pimienta, una comunidad tzotzil de Simojovel, donde sus habitantes, niños y adultos, trabajan de siete de la mañana a tres de la tarde para extraerlo de las minas por sueldos sumamente bajos.

La publicación detalla que el ámbar generó una nueva forma de hacer negocio, desde la renta de minas de aproximadamente seis mil pesos mensuales para exportarlo a China, Corea y Taiwán en donde es vendido en más de 600 pesos cada piedra, el equivalente al gramo de oro de 24 quilates, según declaraciones de artesanos chiapanecos.

Fuente: El Universal/

rural Christians in China’s Henan Province

Uploaded on Sep 15, 2011 This video shows rural Christians in China’s Henan Province receiving Bibles. 70% of China’s Christians live in rural areas, where people struggle to make a living. Many of the villagers in this video received their … Continue reading

Uploaded on Sep 15, 2011
This video shows rural Christians in China’s Henan Province receiving Bibles. 70% of China’s Christians live in rural areas, where people struggle to make a living. Many of the villagers in this video received their very first Bible during this distribution.

BRIC´s bank

BEIJING
In July 2014, nations known as the “BRICS,” Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, announced the creation of a new, $100 billion development bank (NDB). The project is aimed at lending money to developing nations for investments, much like how the American and European-backed International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank operate.

Liu Haifang, a professor at Peking University’s Center for African Studies, said the bank will provide developing countries with more options for financing.


BRICs Bank To Rival World Bank and IMF and Challenge Dollar Dominance

Outgoing President of the World Bank, Robert Zoellick, after just three days ago dismissing the idea of a BRICs created, new global multi lateral bank, has come around and endorsed a BRICs bank in an interview with the FT.

Zoellick had initially said that a BRICs bank and potential rival to the western and U.S. dominated IMF and World Bank, would be difficult to implement given competing BRIC interests.

He acknowledged that a BRICs bank was being created and said that the World Bank supported such a bank. He said that not having Russia and China as part of “the World Bank system” would be a “mistake of historic proportions”.

Leaders of the BRICS nations meeting in India appear to have made much progress in creating a new global bank as the emerging economies seek to convert their growing economic might into collective diplomatic influence.

The five countries now account for nearly 28% of the global economy, a figure that is expected to continue to grow.

On Thursday morning, President Hu Jintao of China, President Dmitry Medvedev of Russia , President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, President Jacob Zuma of South Africa and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India shook hands at the start of the one day meeting in New Delhi.

Read more: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2012-04-02/markets/31272774_1_gold-prices-world-gold-council-world-bank#ixzz1ra85vRk9

BEIJING
In July 2014, nations known as the “BRICS,” Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, announced the creation of a new, $100 billion development bank (NDB). The project is aimed at lending money to developing nations for investments, much like how the American and European-backed International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank operate.

Liu Haifang, a professor at Peking University’s Center for African Studies, said the bank will provide developing countries with more options for financing.


BRICs Bank To Rival World Bank and IMF and Challenge Dollar Dominance

Outgoing President of the World Bank, Robert Zoellick, after just three days ago dismissing the idea of a BRICs created, new global multi lateral bank, has come around and endorsed a BRICs bank in an interview with the FT.

Zoellick had initially said that a BRICs bank and potential rival to the western and U.S. dominated IMF and World Bank, would be difficult to implement given competing BRIC interests.

He acknowledged that a BRICs bank was being created and said that the World Bank supported such a bank. He said that not having Russia and China as part of “the World Bank system” would be a “mistake of historic proportions”.

Leaders of the BRICS nations meeting in India appear to have made much progress in creating a new global bank as the emerging economies seek to convert their growing economic might into collective diplomatic influence.

The five countries now account for nearly 28% of the global economy, a figure that is expected to continue to grow.

On Thursday morning, President Hu Jintao of China, President Dmitry Medvedev of Russia , President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, President Jacob Zuma of South Africa and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India shook hands at the start of the one day meeting in New Delhi.

Read more: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2012-04-02/markets/31272774_1_gold-prices-world-gold-council-world-bank#ixzz1ra85vRk9