How to Learn Japanese

Hacking the Kanji: 2,200 Kanji in 97 Days

Be warned: this post on how to learn the kanji easily and remember them is very long.
step-by-step breakdown of how you can and should learn the kanji in 97 days.

excerpt from Hacking Japanese Supercourse, a practical, detailed guidebook for mastering the Japanese language.

Divide the Kanji into Constituents

Create Effective Mnemonics

I first learned about this person from the website Hacking Chinese, which has an amazing article titled “Remembering is a skill you can learn.”
If you go look at that article, it will talk about the mechanics of memory.

Only Worry About 1 Thing: Recognizing the Meaning of Characters

As you will learn very early in your Japanese studies, there are many different elements to “learning the kanji,” which, by itself, is quite a vague statement. For example, consider the following. Say we have the kanji 食, which means “eat.” There are many aspects to “knowing” this kanji:
taberu kanji
(Image from Jisho.org)
  1. In general, it means “eat,” “eating,” or “food.”
  2. The On’Yomi (Chinese-derived reading) is しょく / shoku or じき / jiki.
    • Yeah, by the way, there are different sounds for each kanji. This is one of the side effects of smashing Japanese into the Chinese writing system. So, for one characters, there are many possible readings (ways to pronounce it). We’ll worry about this later. Also, it won’t be stressful at all.
  3. The Kun’Yomi (Japanese reading) is た.べる / taberu or く.う / kuu or く.らう kurau.
  4. This is the stroke order:
taberu stroke order
That’s a lot of info, right? And I’ve had so many readers email me saying that they think they should just learn all of that at once in a sort of get-it-over-with attack on kanji. I also have readers that look at all of that information and just say, “You know what? This just isn’t for me after all.”

Review Them with an SRS Program (Anki)

three tools? Well…
  1. Anki Flashcards will keep us from forgetting what we learn.
  2. Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji will help us break our kanji into parts so we can learn them via stories and mnemonics.
  3. Reviewing the Kanji will save us when we have a hard time coming up with our own kanji stories and mnemonics.
Used together, these three tools can speed up your kanji acquisition exponentially.

Keep a Time-Efficient Flow

Clean Up Mnemonics over Time

Decide Your Challenge Time Period

Prioritizing Your Study Flow

Do every single review card every single day.

Find Your Study Sanctuary

Focus on the Habit

Get Your Grit On

I read this really awesome article on grit recently, and I thought that it could definitely apply to language learning. I probably sound like a broken record talking about how we need to make studying into an enjoyable, routine process full of flowers and sexy anime girls. But there’s no sugarcoating the fact that this will be difficult. This will be work. This will require grit and resilience.
A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets To Grit And Resilience
What we can learn from James, the SEALs and the research on how to have grit:
  1. Purpose and meaning. It’s easier to be persistent when what we’re doing is tied to something personally meaningful.
  2. Make it a game. It’s the best way to stay in a competitive mindset without stressing yourself out.
  3. Be confident — but realistic. See the challenges honestly but believe in your own ability to take them on.
  4. Prepare, prepare, prepare. Grit comes a lot easier when you’ve done the work to make sure you’re ready.
  5. [For #5-8, Please read the original article, below.]
–            Eric Barker, from “A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets To Grit And Resilience,” from Barking Up The Wrong Tree

Don’t Make Kanji the Enemy

 

1 Kanji at a Time

Just take it 1 kanji at a time. Don’t look forward. Look at the one kanji. Some day in the future, that kanji will be the last kanji. It doesn’t matter when that day is. All that matters is knowing that such a day exists, and it will come eventually.

Kanji Challenge Recap

  1. Download Anki.
  2. Download the Nihongoshark.com Kanji Deck.
  3. Set Anki’s preferences.
  4. Start learning new kanji.
  5. Repeat new-kanji-learning process 2,131 times.
  6. Review kanji flashcards every day.

Hacking Japanese Supercourse

Like I said at the beginning of this article, this is an excerpt from the Hacking Japanese Supercourse.

Hermann Ebbinghaus (January 24, 1850 – February 26, 1909) was a German psychologist who pioneered the experimental study of memory, and is known for his discovery of the forgetting curve and the spacing effect. He was also the first person to describe thelearning curve.[1] He was the father of the eminent neo-Kantian philosopher Julius Ebbinghaus.

Published on Jun 22, 2013

“Remembering and learning the Kanji” – How to learn 2,200 Japanese Kanji characters using Heisig (stroke order and meaning) the easy, fun and most importantly – quick way. 
*GET SPEAKING WITH A JAPANESE PERSON!* (iTalki): http://promos.italki.com/abroad-in-ja… 

When I found out the Japanese writing system, Kanji, has over 2,000 characters I nearly packed up my bags and went home after I finished crying – but after discovering a fun and creative solution to the problem , which turned a hell of a task into a short, enjoyable one, I feel I have to share the method with the world.

The method revolves around a book called “Remembering the Kanji” by Heisig and is very popular for learners of Japanese who struggle with the characters. I highly recommend the book to all and it can be found HERE:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/08…

For those interested in Japan, sarcasm and ridiculous things, why not check out the rest of my YouTube channel here:http://www.youtube.com/user/cmbroad44…

And why not check out AbroadinJapan.com for articles as well, including how to fail in a Tokyo Nightclub:
http://www.abroadinjapan.com/






Hacking the Kanji: 2,200 Kanji in 97 Days

Be warned: this post on how to learn the kanji easily and remember them is very long.
step-by-step breakdown of how you can and should learn the kanji in 97 days.

excerpt from Hacking Japanese Supercourse, a practical, detailed guidebook for mastering the Japanese language.

Divide the Kanji into Constituents

Create Effective Mnemonics

I first learned about this person from the website Hacking Chinese, which has an amazing article titled “Remembering is a skill you can learn.”
If you go look at that article, it will talk about the mechanics of memory.

Only Worry About 1 Thing: Recognizing the Meaning of Characters

As you will learn very early in your Japanese studies, there are many different elements to “learning the kanji,” which, by itself, is quite a vague statement. For example, consider the following. Say we have the kanji ?, which means “eat.” There are many aspects to “knowing” this kanji:
taberu kanji
(Image from Jisho.org)
  1. In general, it means “eat,” “eating,” or “food.”
  2. The On’Yomi (Chinese-derived reading) is ??? / shoku or ?? / jiki.
    • Yeah, by the way, there are different sounds for each kanji. This is one of the side effects of smashing Japanese into the Chinese writing system. So, for one characters, there are many possible readings (ways to pronounce it). We’ll worry about this later. Also, it won’t be stressful at all.
  3. The Kun’Yomi (Japanese reading) is ?.?? / taberu or ?.? / kuu or ?.?? kurau.
  4. This is the stroke order:
taberu stroke order
That’s a lot of info, right? And I’ve had so many readers email me saying that they think they should just learn all of that at once in a sort of get-it-over-with attack on kanji. I also have readers that look at all of that information and just say, “You know what? This just isn’t for me after all.”

Review Them with an SRS Program (Anki)

three tools? Well…
  1. Anki Flashcards will keep us from forgetting what we learn.
  2. Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji will help us break our kanji into parts so we can learn them via stories and mnemonics.
  3. Reviewing the Kanji will save us when we have a hard time coming up with our own kanji stories and mnemonics.
Used together, these three tools can speed up your kanji acquisition exponentially.

Keep a Time-Efficient Flow

Clean Up Mnemonics over Time

Decide Your Challenge Time Period

Prioritizing Your Study Flow

Do every single review card every single day.

Find Your Study Sanctuary

Focus on the Habit

Get Your Grit On

I read this really awesome article on grit recently, and I thought that it could definitely apply to language learning. I probably sound like a broken record talking about how we need to make studying into an enjoyable, routine process full of flowers and sexy anime girls. But there’s no sugarcoating the fact that this will be difficult. This will be work. This will require grit and resilience.
A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets To Grit And Resilience
What we can learn from James, the SEALs and the research on how to have grit:
  1. Purpose and meaning. It’s easier to be persistent when what we’re doing is tied to something personally meaningful.
  2. Make it a game. It’s the best way to stay in a competitive mindset without stressing yourself out.
  3. Be confident — but realistic. See the challenges honestly but believe in your own ability to take them on.
  4. Prepare, prepare, prepare. Grit comes a lot easier when you’ve done the work to make sure you’re ready.
  5. [For #5-8, Please read the original article, below.]
–            Eric Barker, from “A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets To Grit And Resilience,” from Barking Up The Wrong Tree

Don’t Make Kanji the Enemy

 

1 Kanji at a Time

Just take it 1 kanji at a time. Don’t look forward. Look at the one kanji. Some day in the future, that kanji will be the last kanji. It doesn’t matter when that day is. All that matters is knowing that such a day exists, and it will come eventually.

Kanji Challenge Recap

  1. Download Anki.
  2. Download the Nihongoshark.com Kanji Deck.
  3. Set Anki’s preferences.
  4. Start learning new kanji.
  5. Repeat new-kanji-learning process 2,131 times.
  6. Review kanji flashcards every day.

Hacking Japanese Supercourse

Like I said at the beginning of this article, this is an excerpt from the Hacking Japanese Supercourse.

Hermann Ebbinghaus (January 24, 1850 – February 26, 1909) was a German psychologist who pioneered the experimental study of memory, and is known for his discovery of the forgetting curve and the spacing effect. He was also the first person to describe thelearning curve.[1] He was the father of the eminent neo-Kantian philosopher Julius Ebbinghaus.

Published on Jun 22, 2013

“Remembering and learning the Kanji” – How to learn 2,200 Japanese Kanji characters using Heisig (stroke order and meaning) the easy, fun and most importantly – quick way. 
*GET SPEAKING WITH A JAPANESE PERSON!* (iTalki): http://promos.italki.com/abroad-in-ja… 

When I found out the Japanese writing system, Kanji, has over 2,000 characters I nearly packed up my bags and went home after I finished crying – but after discovering a fun and creative solution to the problem , which turned a hell of a task into a short, enjoyable one, I feel I have to share the method with the world.

The method revolves around a book called “Remembering the Kanji” by Heisig and is very popular for learners of Japanese who struggle with the characters. I highly recommend the book to all and it can be found HERE:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/08…

For those interested in Japan, sarcasm and ridiculous things, why not check out the rest of my YouTube channel here:http://www.youtube.com/user/cmbroad44…

And why not check out AbroadinJapan.com for articles as well, including how to fail in a Tokyo Nightclub:
http://www.abroadinjapan.com/

Why are we doing this?

Originally posted on Sonia Furstenau:
It’s hard to believe what’s going on in Shawnigan Lake. Doctors, realtors, teachers, home builders, nurses, scientists, young mothers and fathers, grandparents – people from all walks of life are putting their lives aside to…

Sonia Furstenau

SIA Protest Stebbings Road-2

It’s hard to believe what’s going on in Shawnigan Lake.

Doctors, realtors, teachers, home builders, nurses, scientists, young mothers and fathers, grandparents – people from all walks of life are putting their lives aside to give all their energy and effort to one thing: trying to stop the loads of contaminated soil being dumped on a mountain above our lake where the headwaters of our watershed flow.

And while the people gather over and over again there is a resounding silence from the provincial government.

Premier Christy Clark, Minister of Environment Mary Polak, and the Liberal MLAs are putting holiday greetings out on their social media pages, wishing everyone a safe and happy break, urging people to enjoy time with their families.

But there is not even a whisper from this government about what is happening in Shawnigan Lake, where hundreds get up in the freezing dark to stand on…

View original post 647 more words

water crises

Last year, news broke that Nestlé, the largest bottled water producer in the world, had been extracting water from the drought-stricken San Bernardino National Forest on a permit that was supposed to expire in 1988 — and hadn’t been re-evaluated … Continue reading

Last year, news broke that Nestlé, the largest bottled water producer in the world, had been extracting water from the drought-stricken San Bernardino National Forest on a permit that was supposed to expire in 1988 — and hadn’t been re-evaluated by the U.S. Forest Service in nearly 40 years!

Now, the Forest Service is proposing to renew Nestlé’s permit for another five years, even as drought conditions persists in the western U.S.1

That’s unacceptable. But our pressure can make a difference. The latest Forest Service plan comes after intense public pressure on the agency, including petitions from more than 190,000 CREDO activists. In a major step forward, the proposal triggers a re-evaluation of the impact of Nestlé’s water withdrawals under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). We have to make sure the review is as comprehensive as possible, which will show that Nestlé’s water extraction must be put to a stop.

Tell the U.S. Forest Service: Conduct a comprehensive review and put a stop to Nestlé’s water extraction in the San Bernardino National Forest. Submit a comment now.

Nestlé has been taking a self-reported 25 million gallons a year from the forest’s Strawberry Creek — which is only at 10 percent of its 90—year average level.2 As the water level drops over the summer, Nestlé’s continued withdrawals pose a risk to the creek ecosystem by making water levels even lower.

Incredibly, Nestlé pays only $524 (yes, five hundred and twenty four dollars!) each year to draw out the tens of millions of gallons it sells to the public under the Arrowhead Mountain label.

But this isn’t just about Nestlé or the San Bernardino National Forest — it’s a symbol of a much deeper problem in federal lands management that continues to prioritize corporate profits over protecting and preserving public resources.

Sally Jewell, secretary of the Department of the Interior, recently laid out a vision for re-evaluating our federal lands management to prioritize protection and preservation.3 But the U.S. Forest Service, which is under the Department of Agriculture, controls a full 25 percent of federal lands.

Pushing for the Forest Service to stop rubber-stamping Nestlé’s corporate water profiteering sends an important signal in the fight to preserve our public lands and resources.

Submit a comment now urging the Forest Service to stop Nestlé’s water extraction.

Thank you speaking out.

Elijah Zarlin, Director of Climate Campaigns
CREDO Action from Working Assets

Add your name:

Take action now ?
  1. Agency proposes 5-year Nestle bottled water permit,” Desert Sun News, 3/18/16.
  2. After years, review of Nestle water permit to begin,” Desert Sun News, 8/24/15.
  3. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell is calling for ‘a major course correction’ in the way the nation conserves its public lands,” Associated Press, 4/19/16.

The questions is: What happens when a military superpower and 1,5 billion desperate people start running out of water?


Future Impact of Climate Change Visible Now in Yemen

November 24, 2014

Water conflict is a term describing a conflict between countries, states, or groups over an access to water resources.[1][2][3] The United Nations recognizes that water disputes result from opposing interests of water users, public or private.[4]

A wide range of water conflicts appear throughout history, though rarely are traditional wars waged over water alone.[5] Instead, water has historically been a source of tension and a factor in conflicts that start for other reasons. However, water conflicts arise for several reasons, including territorial disputes, a fight for resources, and strategic advantage.[6] A comprehensive online database of water-related conflicts—the Water Conflict Chronology—has been developed by the Pacific Institute.[7] This database lists violence over water going back nearly 5,000 years.

These conflicts occur over both freshwater and saltwater, and both between and within nations. However, conflicts occur mostly over freshwater; because freshwater resources are necessary, yet limited, they are the center of water disputes arising out of need for potable water and irrigation.[8] As freshwater is a vital, yet unevenly distributed natural resource, its availability often impacts the living and economic conditions of a country or region. The lack of cost-effective water supply options in areas like the Middle East,[9] among other elements of water crises can put severe pressures on all water users, whether corporate, government, or individual, leading to tension, and possibly aggression.[10] Recent humanitarian catastrophes, such as the Rwandan Genocide or the war in Sudanese Darfur, have been linked back to water conflicts.[1]

A recent report “Water Cooperation for a Secure World” published by Strategic Foresight Group concludes that active water cooperation between countries reduces the risk of war. This conclusion is reached after examining trans-boundary water relations in over 200 shared river basins in 148 countries,[11] though as noted below, a growing number of water conflicts are sub-national.


No Wars for Water

Why Climate Change Has Not Led to Conflict


From California to the Middle East, huge areas of the world are drying up and a billion people have no access to safe drinking water. US intelligence is warning of the dangers of shrinking resources and experts say the world is ‘standing on a precipice’

Perhaps this chapter from THE WORLD’S WATER Volume 8 The Biennial Report on Freshwater Resources will be of interest (you should have heard of this book – The World’s Water is the most comprehensive and up-to-to date source of information and analysis on freshwater resources.)

The Syrian Conflict and the Role of Water

‘Starting in 2006, however, and lasting into 2011, Syria experienced a multi-season extreme drought and agricultural failures, described by Shahrzad Mohtadi as the “worst long-term drought and most severe set of crop failures since agricultural civilizations began in the Fertile Crescent many millennia ago” (Mohtadi 2012).

Robert Worth of the New York Times noted that this drought contributed to a series of social and economic dislocations (Worth 2010). The United Nations estimated that by 2011, the drought was affecting 2–3 million people, with 1 million driven into food insecurity. More than 1.5 million people—mostly agricultural workers and family farmers—moved from rural regions to cities and temporary settlements near urban centers, especially on the outskirts of Aleppo, Hama, Homs, Damascus, and Dara’a.

A research paper published in 2012 suggested that climate change is already beginning to influence long-term droughts in the region including Syria by reducing winter rainfall (Hoerling et al. 2012). That study suggests that winter droughts are increasingly common and that human-caused climate change is playing a role. Martin Hoerling of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Earth System Research Laboratory, one of the study’s authors, stated, “The magnitude and frequency of the drying that has occurred is too great to be explained by natural variability alone” (NOAA 2011).

If the international community wants to reduce the risks of local and international political conflicts and violence over water, more effort will have to be put into recognizing these risks and improving the tools needed to reduce them. ‘

—-

other reports have also shown the link between climate change and the war in Syria. For example,

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/03/150302-syria-war-climate-change-drought/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/climate-change-hastened-the-syrian-war/

http://www.pnas.org/content/112/11/3241.abstract

the last of these states ‘We conclude that human influences on the climate system are implicated in the current Syrian conflict.’

A leading panel of retired generals and admirals, the CNA Corporation Military Advisory Board, recently labeled the impacts of climate change “catalysts for conflict” in vulnerable regions. The Pentagon concluded similarly in last year’s Quadrennial Defense Review that the effects of climate change are “threat multipliers,” enabling terrorism and other violence by aggravating underlying societal problems.

The CNA report states:

‘The nature and pace of observed climate changes—and an emerging scientific consensus on their projected consequences—pose severe risks for our national security. During our decades of experience in the U.S. military, we have addressed many national security challenges, from containment and deterrence of the Soviet nuclear threat during the Cold War to political extremism and transnational terrorism in recent years. The national security risks of projected climate change are as serious as any challenges we have faced. ‘

—-

The Pentagon report states:

‘Climate change poses another significant challenge for the United States and the world at large. As greenhouse gas emissions increase, sea levels are rising, average global temperatures are increasing, and severe weather patterns are accelerating. These changes, coupled with other global dynamics, including growing, urbanizing, more affluent populations, and substantial economic growth in India, China, Brazil, and other nations, will devastate homes, land, and infrastructure. Climate change may exacerbate water scarcity and lead to sharp increases in food costs. The pressures caused by climate change will influence resource competition while placing additional burdens on economies, societies, and governance institutions around the world. These effects are threat multipliers that will aggravate stressors abroad such as poverty, environmental degradation, political instability, and social tensions – conditions that can enable terrorist activity and other forms of violence.’

and on the Turkana in northern Kenya:

Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (chapters 4-6 look at Kenya)

http://www.amazon.com/Tropic-Chaos-Climate-Geography-Violence/dp/1568587295

Climate Change and the Turkana and Merille Conflict

http://www1.american.edu/ted/ice/turkana-merille.htm

Climate Change and Violent Conflict in Kenya: A Two-way Relationship.

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/262984122_Climate_Change_and_Violent_Conflict_in_Kenya_A_Two….

The video here might also help http://e360.yale.edu/feature/when_the_water_ends_africas_climate_conflicts/2331/

Memoirs of Mr. Hempher

Memoirs of Mr. Hempher, The British Spy to the Middle East or Confessions of a British Spy is a document purporting to be the account by an 18th-century British agent, Hempher, of his instrumental role in founding the conservative Islamic … Continue reading

Memoirs of Mr. Hempher, The British Spy to the Middle East or Confessions of a British Spy is a document purporting to be the account by an 18th-century British agent, Hempher, of his instrumental role in founding the conservative Islamic reform movement of Wahhabism, as part of a conspiracy to corrupt Islam. It first appeared in 1888, in Turkish, in the five-volume Mir’at al-Haramayn of Ayyub Sabri Pasha (who is thought to be the actual author by at least one scholar).[1] It has been described as “apocryphal“,[2] a “forgery”, “utter nonsense”,[3] and “an Anglophobic variation on The Protocols of the Elders of Zion”.[2] It has been widely translated and disseminated, is available on the internet,[3][4][5][6] and still enjoys some currency among some individuals in theMiddle East and beyond. In 2002, an Iraqi military officer recapitulated the book in a “top secret document”.[1][7]

Tree Poaching In Old Growth Forest Along the Smith River

Originally posted on Siskiyou Land Conservancy:
There’s tree poaching going on in the Smith River National Recreation Area (SRNRA), near Big Flat on the South Fork Smith River. Not just any trees, but some of the biggest, oldest madrones in…

Siskiyou Land Conservancy

MadronePoach15N38Dec2015#2

There’s tree poaching going on in the Smith River National Recreation Area (SRNRA), near Big Flat on the South Fork Smith River. Not just any trees, but some of the biggest, oldest madrones in the region. It’s a tragic, bitter loss of some of the finest trees around, in protected old growth area. If you have information about who might be doing this please contact us or go directly to the law enforcement officer for the SRNRA: Jeremy Mack, 707-457-3874. (Please call only if you have information. Incredibly, Mack is the only enforcement officer for the entire 305,000-acre Smith River National Recreation Area.)

According to officials at the SRNRA, tree poaching is “a forest-wide problem.” In this case, it appears that the perpetrators, who cut down the giant madrones but left them, were planning to return to the site with a crane and a flatbed truck to haul out whole trees, probably for…

View original post 41 more words

?????

Uploaded on May 22, 2011
1999年4月25日發生了震動世界的法輪功萬人北京上訪事件,事件真相被中共封鎖至­今已有15年,”4.25法輪功萬人上訪真相”仍作為被禁的關鍵­詞,被中共嚴密封鎖和抹黑。
那一天,一萬多名法輪大法修煉者從四面八方來到北京國務院信訪辦公室所在地和平請願。­從清晨到夜晚,歷時十多個小時,無暴力、無口號、無擾民、無垃圾、善意平靜,創造了在­中共幾十年極權統治下不曾有過的官民成功對話、圓滿解決問題的獨有範例,也為

Uploaded on May 22, 2011
1999?4?25???????????????????????????????­???15??”4.25?????????”????????­?????????????
????????????????????????????????????????­????????????????????????????????????????­????????????????????????????????????

los bosques de Chernobyl

por Kike Pérez
el 14/12/2015

La tragedia natural vivida en la central nuclear de Chernobyl el 26 de abril de 1986, obligó al gobierno a evacuar la zona y las poblaciones adyacentes. Tras contener el reactor y estudiar el escape radiactivo, se determinó que la zona no era pata para la vida y 30 años después, la zona de exclusión permanece cerrada.

Las patrullas policiales vigilan el perímetro para evitar que nadie se adentre en razona radiactiva. A pesar de ello, Chernobyl y su atmósfera desoladora atraen a miles de personas cada año, deseosas de curiosear en sus calles y edificios vacíos.

Algo peligroso, ya que según indican los investigadores que trabajan en la zona limítrofe, la radiación es muy intensa en la zona centro. En cambio, la zona exterior parece estar sufriendo un inesperado cambio que ha dejado a los observadores de la vida silvestre de Chernobyl, gratamente sorprendidos.

Según explican, después de 30 años sin presencia humana en la zona, la vegetación floreció de forma abrumadora. Con grandes cantidades de comida, la población de herbívoros creció exponencialmente, y la zona se llenó de alces, ciervos, jabalíes, liebres y roedores.

por Kike Pérez
el 14/12/2015

La tragedia natural vivida en la central nuclear de Chernobyl el 26 de abril de 1986, obligó al gobierno a evacuar la zona y las poblaciones adyacentes. Tras contener el reactor y estudiar el escape radiactivo, se determinó que la zona no era pata para la vida y 30 años después, la zona de exclusión permanece cerrada.

Las patrullas policiales vigilan el perímetro para evitar que nadie se adentre en razona radiactiva. A pesar de ello, Chernobyl y su atmósfera desoladora atraen a miles de personas cada año, deseosas de curiosear en sus calles y edificios vacíos.

Algo peligroso, ya que según indican los investigadores que trabajan en la zona limítrofe, la radiación es muy intensa en la zona centro. En cambio, la zona exterior parece estar sufriendo un inesperado cambio que ha dejado a los observadores de la vida silvestre de Chernobyl, gratamente sorprendidos.

Según explican, después de 30 años sin presencia humana en la zona, la vegetación floreció de forma abrumadora. Con grandes cantidades de comida, la población de herbívoros creció exponencialmente, y la zona se llenó de alces, ciervos, jabalíes, liebres y roedores.