the prospect of future wealth

In 2000, economist Steven Levitt and sociologist Sudhir Venkatesh published an article in the Quarterly Journal of Economics about the internal wage structure of a Chicago drug gang. This piece would later serve as a basis for a chapter in … Continue reading

In 2000, economist Steven Levitt and sociologist Sudhir Venkatesh published an article in the Quarterly Journal of Economics about the internal wage structure of a Chicago drug gang. This piece would later serve as a basis for a chapter in Levitt’s (and Dubner’s) best seller Freakonomics. [1] The title of the chapter, “Why drug dealers still live with their moms”, was based on the finding that the income distribution within gangs was extremely skewed in favor  of those at the top, while the rank-and-file street sellers earned even less than employees in legitimate low-skilled activities, let’s say at McDonald’s. They calculated 3.30 dollars as the hourly rate, that is, well below a living wage (that’s why they still live with their moms). [2]

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el primero de la ecovia

30/01/2014 06:17 AM

Monterrey

Durante su segundo día de operaciones, un camión de la Ecovía participó en un accidente vial, quedando en el registro como el primero para el recién inaugurado transporte público.

El percance fue reportado sobre la avenida Lincoln a la altura de la calle Aguaturma, en la colonia Valle Verde al norponiente de Monterrey.

La unidad de la Ecovía, con número económico

30/01/2014 06:17 AM

Monterrey

Durante su segundo día de operaciones, un camión de la Ecovía participó en un accidente vial, quedando en el registro como el primero para el recién inaugurado transporte público.

El percance fue reportado sobre la avenida Lincoln a la altura de la calle Aguaturma, en la colonia Valle Verde al norponiente de Monterrey.

La unidad de la Ecovía, con número económico

La Tuta

Published on Jan 28, 2014You might pass Servando “La Tuta” Gomez on the street and not look twice. But with a $2.5m bounty on his head, the charismatic leader of Mexico’s Knights Templar drug cartel commands respect and fear.Sign up for Snowmail, your…

Published on Jan 28, 2014

You might pass Servando “La Tuta” Gomez on the street and not look twice. But with a $2.5m bounty on his head, the charismatic leader of Mexico’s Knights Templar drug cartel commands respect and fear.Sign up for Snowmail, your daily preview of what is on

U.S. Drone Program

Edited time: October 29, 2013 20:58

 
 

The victims of a drone strike alleged to be launched last year by the United States spoke to members of Congress on Tuesday and urged the US government to stop killing civilians with weaponized unmanned aerial vehicles.

Rafiq ur Rehman, a primary school teacher from North Waziristan, Pakistan, spoke through an interpreter on Capitol Hill on Tuesday along with his two children, ages nine and 13.

Rep. Alan Grayson (D-Florida) invited Rehman to speak in Washington about the strike last October that killed Momina Bibi, his 67-year-old mother who was recognized around the region as a midwife, not a militant. Regardless, a weaponized drone purported to be under the control of the US Central Intelligence Agency executed Bibi in front of her grandchildren on Oct. 24, 2012. The US has not formally acknowledged the attack, nor taken responsibility.

“Nobody has ever told me why my mother was targeted that day,” Rehman said during the Tuesday morning panel. “All media reported three, four, five militants were killed. But only one person was killed that day. A mom, grandma, a midwife.”

“The string that holds the pearls together. That is what my mother was,” Rahman said. “Since her death, the string has been broken and life has not been the same. We feel alone and we feel lost.”

Speaking before members of Congress, Rehman thanked Rep. Grayson for the invitation and said it was reassuring that some members of the US government are willing to try and shed light on a gruesome operation rarely acknowledged publicly in Washington.

“As a teacher my job is to educate,” said Rehman. “But how can I teach this? How can I teach what I don’t understand?”

Rehman’s 12-year-old son, Zubair, told Grayson and the few congressional colleagues that joined him on the Hill Tuesday that he was with his grandmother last year when she was killed shortly after the buzzing of a drone was heard hovering above them.

“As I helped my grandma in the field, I could see and hear drone overhead but wasn’t worried because we’re not militants,” Zubair said. “I no longer like blue skies. In fact, I prefer gray skies. When sky brightens, drones return and we live in fear.”

“We used to love to play outside. But now people are afraid to leave their houses so we don’t play very often,” the boy added.

Zubair’s sister, nine-year-old Nabila, was picking okra in a field with her grandmother at the time of the attack. She testified that she heard the noise from above. “Everything was dark and I couldn’t see anything, but I heard a scream…I was very scared and all I could think of doing was just run,” she said.

The Rehman’s were joined at the hearing by Robert Greenwald, a filmmaker who has been working in Pakistan over the past several months on a project related to the ongoing US drone strikes. Testifying on his own behalf, Greenwald suggested that the ongoing operations waged by the US as an alleged counter-terrorism operation are breeding anti-American sentiment at a rate that makes Al-Qaeda jealous.

“Yes, there are 100 or 200 fanatics, but now you have 800,000 people in this area who hate the United States because of this policy,” Greenwald said. Indeed, last week a former US State Department official claimed that drone strikes in Yemen are creating dozens of new militants with each attack.

Greenwald added that the research he’s seen indicated that 178 children have been killed in Pakistan by US drone strikes. Independent studies suggest that the total number of civilians killed by unmanned aerial vehicles may be in the thousands.

“We’ve gone from being the most popular country among Pakistani to, according to the polling I’ve seen, the least popular,” Grayson said. “And if you ask people why, the reason is this program.”

Despite these numbers, though, the White House maintains that the best intelligence agencies in the world work in tandem with the mightiest military in order to gather information about targets, then order hits intended to take out extremists and cause as little collateral damage as possible.

According to Greenwald, this system is not without its flaws.

“How could we make decisions, let’s be clear about this, making decisions to clear people based on guesses?” asked Greenwald. “Guesses. No jury, no judge, no trial, no defense but because they are sitting in a certain pattern, because they’re in a certain place, an entire community of leadership has been wiped out.”

“I hope that by telling you about my village and grandmother, you realize drones are not the answer,” pleaded 12-year-old Zubair.

Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Illinois) said at the hearing that she would bring up the witnesses’ plight with the White House. Grayson said that “friends of the military industrial complex” in Washington would likely keep a full discussion from occurring immediately in Washington, adding that “I don’t expect to see a formal hearing conducted on this subject anytime soon.”


Published on Oct 19, 2013

America’s deadly drone strikes are essentially above the law, and must become transparent and accountable. That’s according to the UN’s special rapporteur on human rights and counter-terrorism. Washington has so far refused to disclose details on where its unmanned aerial strikes occur, and how many civilians are killed. Let’s get some reaction and insight from journalist and former Pakistani Air Force officer, Sultan M. Hali.


Let’s also Remember the 176 children Killed by US Drones

Posted on 12/16/2012 by Juan Cole

The US government continues to rain drones down on the tribal belt of Pakistan. While the Washington narrative is that these drones are precision machines that only kill terrorists, this story is not true.

The drone program is classified, and so it cannot be publicly debated. It cannot even be acknowledged by President Obama and his cabinet members. Drones are operated by civilians and sometimes by contractors. That is, we are subcontracting assassination.
Americans who were upset that the president did not seek congressional authorization for the enforcement of the no-fly zone in Libya are apparently all right with his administration bombing Pakistan without explicit authorization (the 2001 one authorizes action against perpetrators of 9/11, not their children.). The Obama administration has declared that no judges or judicial process need be involved in just blowing away people, even American citizens.
Of the some 3000 persons killed by US drones, something like 600 have been innocent noncombatant bystanders, and of these 176 were children. In some instances the US drone operators have struck at a target, then waited for rescuers to come and struck again, which would be a war crime. Obviously, children may run in panic to the side of an injured parent, so they could get hit by the indiscriminate second strike.
We don’t know the exact circumstances of the children’s deaths because the US government won’t talk about them, indeed, denies it all.
Someone actually wrote me chiding me that the Newtown children were “not in a war zone!” Americans seem not to understand that neither is Waziristan a “war zone.” No war has been declared there, no fronts exist, no calls for evacuation of civilians from their villages have been made. They’re just living their lives, working farms and going to school. They are not Arabs, and most are not Taliban. True, some sketchy Egyptians or Libyans occasionally show up and rent out a spare room. So occasionally an American drone appears out of nowhere and blows them away.
Robert Greenwald of the Brave New Foundation explains further: (warning: graphic and not for the squeamish):


Broad Spectrum of Organizations Support ACLU Legal Fight for Transparency on U.S. Drone Program

nine organizations submitted a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the ACLU’s Freedom of Information Act lawsuit seeking records about the CIA’s use of drones to carry out targeted killings around the world.  The organizations work on a diverse array of issues that don’t always overlap, including international human rights and rule of law, government transparency, investigative journalism, civil liberties and national security policy.  Although some of these groups seldom have occasion to collaborate, they joined together to urge the court to reject the CIA’s position that it can’t confirm whether it has a drone strike program at all.

Edited time: October 29, 2013 20:58

 
 

The victims of a drone strike alleged to be launched last year by the United States spoke to members of Congress on Tuesday and urged the US government to stop killing civilians with weaponized unmanned aerial vehicles.

Rafiq ur Rehman, a primary school teacher from North Waziristan, Pakistan, spoke through an interpreter on Capitol Hill on Tuesday along with his two children, ages nine and 13.

Rep. Alan Grayson (D-Florida) invited Rehman to speak in Washington about the strike last October that killed Momina Bibi, his 67-year-old mother who was recognized around the region as a midwife, not a militant. Regardless, a weaponized drone purported to be under the control of the US Central Intelligence Agency executed Bibi in front of her grandchildren on Oct. 24, 2012. The US has not formally acknowledged the attack, nor taken responsibility.

“Nobody has ever told me why my mother was targeted that day,” Rehman said during the Tuesday morning panel. “All media reported three, four, five militants were killed. But only one person was killed that day. A mom, grandma, a midwife.”

“The string that holds the pearls together. That is what my mother was,” Rahman said. “Since her death, the string has been broken and life has not been the same. We feel alone and we feel lost.”

Speaking before members of Congress, Rehman thanked Rep. Grayson for the invitation and said it was reassuring that some members of the US government are willing to try and shed light on a gruesome operation rarely acknowledged publicly in Washington.

“As a teacher my job is to educate,” said Rehman. “But how can I teach this? How can I teach what I don’t understand?”

Rehman’s 12-year-old son, Zubair, told Grayson and the few congressional colleagues that joined him on the Hill Tuesday that he was with his grandmother last year when she was killed shortly after the buzzing of a drone was heard hovering above them.

“As I helped my grandma in the field, I could see and hear drone overhead but wasn’t worried because we’re not militants,” Zubair said. “I no longer like blue skies. In fact, I prefer gray skies. When sky brightens, drones return and we live in fear.”

“We used to love to play outside. But now people are afraid to leave their houses so we don’t play very often,” the boy added.

Zubair’s sister, nine-year-old Nabila, was picking okra in a field with her grandmother at the time of the attack. She testified that she heard the noise from above. “Everything was dark and I couldn’t see anything, but I heard a scream…I was very scared and all I could think of doing was just run,” she said.

The Rehman’s were joined at the hearing by Robert Greenwald, a filmmaker who has been working in Pakistan over the past several months on a project related to the ongoing US drone strikes. Testifying on his own behalf, Greenwald suggested that the ongoing operations waged by the US as an alleged counter-terrorism operation are breeding anti-American sentiment at a rate that makes Al-Qaeda jealous.

“Yes, there are 100 or 200 fanatics, but now you have 800,000 people in this area who hate the United States because of this policy,” Greenwald said. Indeed, last week a former US State Department official claimed that drone strikes in Yemen are creating dozens of new militants with each attack.

Greenwald added that the research he’s seen indicated that 178 children have been killed in Pakistan by US drone strikes. Independent studies suggest that the total number of civilians killed by unmanned aerial vehicles may be in the thousands.

“We’ve gone from being the most popular country among Pakistani to, according to the polling I’ve seen, the least popular,” Grayson said. “And if you ask people why, the reason is this program.”

Despite these numbers, though, the White House maintains that the best intelligence agencies in the world work in tandem with the mightiest military in order to gather information about targets, then order hits intended to take out extremists and cause as little collateral damage as possible.

According to Greenwald, this system is not without its flaws.

“How could we make decisions, let’s be clear about this, making decisions to clear people based on guesses?” asked Greenwald. “Guesses. No jury, no judge, no trial, no defense but because they are sitting in a certain pattern, because they’re in a certain place, an entire community of leadership has been wiped out.”

“I hope that by telling you about my village and grandmother, you realize drones are not the answer,” pleaded 12-year-old Zubair.

Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Illinois) said at the hearing that she would bring up the witnesses’ plight with the White House. Grayson said that “friends of the military industrial complex” in Washington would likely keep a full discussion from occurring immediately in Washington, adding that “I don’t expect to see a formal hearing conducted on this subject anytime soon.”


Published on Oct 19, 2013

America’s deadly drone strikes are essentially above the law, and must become transparent and accountable. That’s according to the UN’s special rapporteur on human rights and counter-terrorism. Washington has so far refused to disclose details on where its unmanned aerial strikes occur, and how many civilians are killed. Let’s get some reaction and insight from journalist and former Pakistani Air Force officer, Sultan M. Hali.


Let’s also Remember the 176 children Killed by US Drones

Posted on 12/16/2012 by Juan Cole

The US government continues to rain drones down on the tribal belt of Pakistan. While the Washington narrative is that these drones are precision machines that only kill terrorists, this story is not true.

The drone program is classified, and so it cannot be publicly debated. It cannot even be acknowledged by President Obama and his cabinet members. Drones are operated by civilians and sometimes by contractors. That is, we are subcontracting assassination.
Americans who were upset that the president did not seek congressional authorization for the enforcement of the no-fly zone in Libya are apparently all right with his administration bombing Pakistan without explicit authorization (the 2001 one authorizes action against perpetrators of 9/11, not their children.). The Obama administration has declared that no judges or judicial process need be involved in just blowing away people, even American citizens.
Of the some 3000 persons killed by US drones, something like 600 have been innocent noncombatant bystanders, and of these 176 were children. In some instances the US drone operators have struck at a target, then waited for rescuers to come and struck again, which would be a war crime. Obviously, children may run in panic to the side of an injured parent, so they could get hit by the indiscriminate second strike.
We don’t know the exact circumstances of the children’s deaths because the US government won’t talk about them, indeed, denies it all.
Someone actually wrote me chiding me that the Newtown children were “not in a war zone!” Americans seem not to understand that neither is Waziristan a “war zone.” No war has been declared there, no fronts exist, no calls for evacuation of civilians from their villages have been made. They’re just living their lives, working farms and going to school. They are not Arabs, and most are not Taliban. True, some sketchy Egyptians or Libyans occasionally show up and rent out a spare room. So occasionally an American drone appears out of nowhere and blows them away.
Robert Greenwald of the Brave New Foundation explains further: (warning: graphic and not for the squeamish):


Broad Spectrum of Organizations Support ACLU Legal Fight for Transparency on U.S. Drone Program

nine organizations submitted a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the ACLU’s Freedom of Information Act lawsuit seeking records about the CIA’s use of drones to carry out targeted killings around the world.  The organizations work on a diverse array of issues that don’t always overlap, including international human rights and rule of law, government transparency, investigative journalism, civil liberties and national security policy.  Although some of these groups seldom have occasion to collaborate, they joined together to urge the court to reject the CIA’s position that it can’t confirm whether it has a drone strike program at all.

el gnomo

Encuentro con un Publicista

Allá en el bosque, sentado sobre el tronco de un árbol caído, Cri Crí se ocupaba en borrar de la pauta muchas notas musicales sin porvenir, un ruido de pisadas en la hojarasca lo distrajo y alzando la cara vio venir hacia él un hombrecillo regordete con una facilidad de palabra que demostraba haber practicado mucho. El recién llegado se presentó: Ditirambo Farfulla a sus órdenes ¿Ordenes ? Cri Crí no se las da a nadie como no sea un reloj despertador para que repiquete a las seis de la mañana. Bien, pues el muy conversador Ditirambo Farfulla resulto ser un publicista en busca de nuevos horizontes. Publicista es aquel que redacta y se encarga de hacer circular anuncios, avisos y toda clase de reclamo comercial. Este Farfulla pretendía entrar al País de los Cuentos, terreno vírgen en cualquier tipo de promociones, mas aunque no se necesite pasaporte al país de los cuentos no se entra así como así. Es preciso tener costumbre de traspasar las fronteras entre lo real y lo imaginario. Como a Cri Crí le encanta introducir gente nueva, con la mejor voluntad tomó la mano de Ditirambo Farfulla y en menos que canta un gallo ya estaban ambos al otro lado.

Hay que confesar que el País de los Cuentos se parece mucho a nuestro mundo, excepto en el modo como ocurren las cosas. Sin dejar de pensar en el interés que le movía, Farfulla encauzó hábiles preguntas para averiguar quien era el personaje más rico en el País de los Cuentos.

“Yo soy rico” aseguro Cri Crí. Gasto menos de lo que gano y siempre me sobra, pero no era éso lo que Farfulla quería saber sino quien tenía más propiedades en aquella región. Después de un breve silencio Cri Crí recordó que el dueño de bosques, prados, lagunas y lomas era el gnomo ¿Y cómo llego ese gnomo a adquirir tantas riquezas ? Muy sencillo respondió Cri Crí. Gritaba “ésto es mío, ésto es mío, ésto es mío” y así gritando terminó porque todo era suyo. Ditirambo Farfulla estaba pasmado de admiración. A su vez, codiciando una vega florida, pretendió gritar ¡Esto es mío!. “Imposible” le advirtió Cri Crí porque el Gnomo ya gritó antes. Lamentando no ser propietario a tan poco costo Ditirambo Farfulla se consoló con buscar a tan afortunado magnate para sacarle dinero a cambio de publicidad, pero una cosa es buscar al Gnomo y otra muy distinta dar con él.

© Francisco Gabilondo SolerCri-Crí el Grillito Cantor

Hablando de influencias literarias Francisco Gabilondo es indudablemente, si no la más, una de las fuertes y significativas en mi formación. En parte porque prefiero escuchar a leer pero principalmente porque los cuentos de Francisco no son propiamente cosas de niños sino de adulto, de un hombre que le cuenta sus quitas a un niño, a sabiendas que no sera entendido, con la esperanza de dejar una semilla que con el tiempo compartirá una vivencia.

La historia de Farfulla y el gnomo ha sido una de las que más me han intrigado. Ahora sé que gastar menos de lo que se gana y poder ahorrar es un privilegio que pocas personas en el mundo tienen y, como ahora ya no soy de esos, entiendo hasta las entrañas que nosotros los que vivimos al día también somos gente. Pero cuando era niño de privilegio no lo entendía y me intrigaba.

El método de adquisición de riqueza del gnomo es el único posible pero hay una diferencia fundamental entre el mundo de la fantasía y el de los hombres. En el mundo de los hombres la precedencia histórica solo es relevante en lo táctico pero lo esencial es la fuerza, a la que el fuerte llama justicia, y el más fuerte, derecho divino o destino manifiesto.

Cuando nació el hombre no existía más propiedad que el palmo de tierra que pisaba cuando lo pisaba, el cachito de rió donde bebía cuando bebía, la sombra donde dormía cuando dormía, y la mujer que se cogía cuando se la cogía.

Un día a una mujer – siendo ella misma semilla, tierra, y agua – tal vez en la penumbra donde terminan los sueños y nace el día, le hablo Dios de las semillas de los cereales y del ciclo de la vida, de la resurrección de los muertos, de los caminos del sol, y de ritmos. Tun, Tun, Tun. Y la mujer aprendió a sembrar y a cosechar y a escoger y a adaptar.

Con la agricultura llego la necesidad de asentarse y el uso de la fuerza para defender y ocupar buenas parcelas, salvaguardar y saquear buenas cosechas. Pero el concepto de propiedad privada tomo milenios en desarrollarse a partir de la idea de propiedad comunal y el entendimiento de que Dios, el dueño del mundo, es un miembro de nuestro clan.

Dicen los que han visto cosa tan triste, que en la India, por decir un lugar de donde he oído la historia, en villas asoladas por la sequía y la hambruna, donde todos mueren de hambre, los depositarios de semilla madre destinados para la siembra están llenos. ¿Porqué?¿Porque no usar la semilla y vivir unos días más? Cada campesino es un sacerdote del culto de la vida y la resurrección y acabar con la semilla es un sacrilegio y una traición a las abuelas milenarias que desde antes de la historia han trabajado en crear las variedades que tenemos hoy, pero aparte consumir la semilla es consumir la esperanza de la siguiente cosecha y sin esperanza no puede haber vida.

Igual que el gnomo las grandes corporaciones como GM, Monsanto y Bechtel se declaran dueñas del agua, del aire, del sorgo, el arroz, la cebada, de la vida misma y por lo tanto del cuerpo de todos y cada uno. ¿Tendrán toda la justicia y derecho divino de su parte o nos quedara a los nadies un poco de vigor?

Encuentro con un Publicista

Allá en el bosque, sentado sobre el tronco de un árbol caído, Cri Crí se ocupaba en borrar de la pauta muchas notas musicales sin porvenir, un ruido de pisadas en la hojarasca lo distrajo y alzando la cara vio venir hacia él un hombrecillo regordete con una facilidad de palabra que demostraba haber practicado mucho. El recién llegado se presentó: Ditirambo Farfulla a sus órdenes ¿Ordenes ? Cri Crí no se las da a nadie como no sea un reloj despertador para que repiquete a las seis de la mañana. Bien, pues el muy conversador Ditirambo Farfulla resulto ser un publicista en busca de nuevos horizontes. Publicista es aquel que redacta y se encarga de hacer circular anuncios, avisos y toda clase de reclamo comercial. Este Farfulla pretendía entrar al País de los Cuentos, terreno vírgen en cualquier tipo de promociones, mas aunque no se necesite pasaporte al país de los cuentos no se entra así como así. Es preciso tener costumbre de traspasar las fronteras entre lo real y lo imaginario. Como a Cri Crí le encanta introducir gente nueva, con la mejor voluntad tomó la mano de Ditirambo Farfulla y en menos que canta un gallo ya estaban ambos al otro lado.

Hay que confesar que el País de los Cuentos se parece mucho a nuestro mundo, excepto en el modo como ocurren las cosas. Sin dejar de pensar en el interés que le movía, Farfulla encauzó hábiles preguntas para averiguar quien era el personaje más rico en el País de los Cuentos.

“Yo soy rico” aseguro Cri Crí. Gasto menos de lo que gano y siempre me sobra, pero no era éso lo que Farfulla quería saber sino quien tenía más propiedades en aquella región. Después de un breve silencio Cri Crí recordó que el dueño de bosques, prados, lagunas y lomas era el gnomo ¿Y cómo llego ese gnomo a adquirir tantas riquezas ? Muy sencillo respondió Cri Crí. Gritaba “ésto es mío, ésto es mío, ésto es mío” y así gritando terminó porque todo era suyo. Ditirambo Farfulla estaba pasmado de admiración. A su vez, codiciando una vega florida, pretendió gritar ¡Esto es mío!. “Imposible” le advirtió Cri Crí porque el Gnomo ya gritó antes. Lamentando no ser propietario a tan poco costo Ditirambo Farfulla se consoló con buscar a tan afortunado magnate para sacarle dinero a cambio de publicidad, pero una cosa es buscar al Gnomo y otra muy distinta dar con él.

© Francisco Gabilondo SolerCri-Crí el Grillito Cantor

Hablando de influencias literarias Francisco Gabilondo es indudablemente, si no la más, una de las fuertes y significativas en mi formación. En parte porque prefiero escuchar a leer pero principalmente porque los cuentos de Francisco no son propiamente cosas de niños sino de adulto, de un hombre que le cuenta sus quitas a un niño, a sabiendas que no sera entendido, con la esperanza de dejar una semilla que con el tiempo compartirá una vivencia.

La historia de Farfulla y el gnomo ha sido una de las que más me han intrigado. Ahora sé que gastar menos de lo que se gana y poder ahorrar es un privilegio que pocas personas en el mundo tienen y, como ahora ya no soy de esos, entiendo hasta las entrañas que nosotros los que vivimos al día también somos gente. Pero cuando era niño de privilegio no lo entendía y me intrigaba.

El método de adquisición de riqueza del gnomo es el único posible pero hay una diferencia fundamental entre el mundo de la fantasía y el de los hombres. En el mundo de los hombres la precedencia histórica solo es relevante en lo táctico pero lo esencial es la fuerza, a la que el fuerte llama justicia, y el más fuerte, derecho divino o destino manifiesto.

Cuando nació el hombre no existía más propiedad que el palmo de tierra que pisaba cuando lo pisaba, el cachito de rió donde bebía cuando bebía, la sombra donde dormía cuando dormía, y la mujer que se cogía cuando se la cogía.

Un día a una mujer – siendo ella misma semilla, tierra, y agua – tal vez en la penumbra donde terminan los sueños y nace el día, le hablo Dios de las semillas de los cereales y del ciclo de la vida, de la resurrección de los muertos, de los caminos del sol, y de ritmos. Tun, Tun, Tun. Y la mujer aprendió a sembrar y a cosechar y a escoger y a adaptar.

Con la agricultura llego la necesidad de asentarse y el uso de la fuerza para defender y ocupar buenas parcelas, salvaguardar y saquear buenas cosechas. Pero el concepto de propiedad privada tomo milenios en desarrollarse a partir de la idea de propiedad comunal y el entendimiento de que Dios, el dueño del mundo, es un miembro de nuestro clan.

Dicen los que han visto cosa tan triste, que en la India, por decir un lugar de donde he oído la historia, en villas asoladas por la sequía y la hambruna, donde todos mueren de hambre, los depositarios de semilla madre destinados para la siembra están llenos. ¿Porqué?¿Porque no usar la semilla y vivir unos días más? Cada campesino es un sacerdote del culto de la vida y la resurrección y acabar con la semilla es un sacrilegio y una traición a las abuelas milenarias que desde antes de la historia han trabajado en crear las variedades que tenemos hoy, pero aparte consumir la semilla es consumir la esperanza de la siguiente cosecha y sin esperanza no puede haber vida.

Igual que el gnomo las grandes corporaciones como GM, Monsanto y Bechtel se declaran dueñas del agua, del aire, del sorgo, el arroz, la cebada, de la vida misma y por lo tanto del cuerpo de todos y cada uno. ¿Tendrán toda la justicia y derecho divino de su parte o nos quedara a los nadies un poco de vigor?

How the other half lives

After 35 years of teaching at elite private colleges, it was a real culture shock to teach at a junior college—and see a very different system at work.

After 35 years of teaching at elite private colleges, it was a real culture shock to teach at a junior college—and see a very different system at work.

NASA Preparing for 2014 Comet Watch at Mars

A close flyby of Mars in 2014 by comet Siding Spring could deliver opportunities for learning, but also possible hazards for orbiting spacecraft. NASA is preparing for both.


Comet 2013 A1 Siding Spring

A close flyby of Mars in 2014 by comet Siding Spring could deliver opportunities for learning, but also possible hazards for orbiting spacecraft. NASA is preparing for both.


NASA Radar Maps the Winter Pace of Iceland’s Glaciers

A high-precision radar instrument from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., left Southern California for Iceland today to create detailed maps of how glaciers move in the dead of winter.


A small part of the Hofsjökull ice cap in Iceland

A high-precision radar instrument from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., left Southern California for Iceland today to create detailed maps of how glaciers move in the dead of winter.