Cornelio Aguilar Ortega

MÉXICO, D.F., (apro).- Con tan sólo cuatro años de edad, Cornelio Aguilar Ortega, sobrino de la gobernadora de Yucatán, Ivonne Ortega, es propietario de diez predios.Nueve de los terrenos los obtuvo por medio de la figura de donación, y el restant…

MÉXICO, D.F., (apro).- Con tan sólo cuatro años de edad, Cornelio Aguilar Ortega, sobrino de la gobernadora de Yucatán, Ivonne Ortega, es propietario de diez predios.

Nueve de los terrenos los obtuvo por medio de la figura de donación, y el restante mediante compraventa con su padre, Cornelio Aguilar Puc.

El Diario de Yucatán publica este martes que el matrimonio conformado por Socorro Ortega Pacheco, hermana de la gobernadora, y Cornelio Aguilar Puc, se ha enriquecido súbitamente en los últimos años.

El hijo de ambos, Cornelio, a su vez sobrino de Ivonne Ortega, es copropietario de dos bienes junto con su hermanastro, Paul Ortega Pacheco, de acuerdo con documentos obtenidos por medio del Instituto de Seguridad Jurídica Patrimonial de Yucatán.

Revela el periódico:

“La residencia oficial de los esposos Aguilar Ortega es la casa número 302 de la calle 16-A entre 17-A y 19 del fraccionamiento Paraíso Maya, cerca de Altabrisa.

“Fue adquirida en abril de 2008, nueve meses después de la llegada de Ivonne Ortega al gobierno del Estado y del nombramiento de Guadalupe como presidenta honoraria del DIF Yucatán.

“La escritura original estaba a nombre de la pareja, pero, como ya publicamos, Cornelio Aguilar cedió a su esposa el cincuenta por ciento que le correspondía, de tal forma que Guadalupe Ortega se convirtió en dueña única.

“En Paraíso Maya adquirieron también sus casas otros parientes y colaboradores cercanos de la gobernadora. Son casos que también hemos documentado.

“Cuando llegaron a Mérida procedentes de Dzidzantún, de donde Cornelio fue alcalde antes de convertirse en diputado local, el matrimonio Ortega Aguilar se estableció en la casa número 404 de la calle 31 entre 38 y 40 de Residencial del Norte (Chenkú)”.

Cornelio, además, recibe recursos de cargos públicos ligados al gobierno, en los que se ha desempeñado durante los últimos años; entre ellos: director de la Central de Abastos de Mérida y director de Organización de la Secretaría de Política Comunitaria y Social.

Además, fue coordinador de la campaña presidencial de Enrique Peña Nieto en Yucatán.

private universities

Senate Committee Report on For-Profit Colleges Condemns Costs and PracticesBy TAMAR LEWINPublished: July 29, 2012Wrapping up a two-year investigation of for-profit colleges, Senator Tom Harkin will issue a final report on Monday —…

Senate Committee Report on For-Profit Colleges Condemns Costs and Practices

By TAMAR LEWIN
Published: July 29, 2012
Wrapping up a two-year investigation of for-profit colleges, Senator Tom Harkin will issue a final report on Monday — a voluminous, hard-hitting indictment of almost every aspect of the industry, filled with troubling statistics and anecdotes drawn from internal documents of the 30 companies investigated.
Senator Tom Harkin, chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, completed a two-year investigation.
Schoolbook

According to the report, which was posted online in advance, taxpayers spent $32 billion in the most recent year on companies that operate for-profit colleges, but the majority of students they enroll leave without a degree, half of those within four months.
“In this report, you will find overwhelming documentation of exorbitant tuition, aggressive recruiting practices, abysmal student outcomes, taxpayer dollars spent on marketing and pocketed as profit, and regulatory evasion and manipulation,” Mr. Harkin, an Iowa Democrat who is chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, said in a statement on Sunday. “These practices are not the exception — they are the norm. They are systemic throughout the industry, with very few individual exceptions.”
In a statement on Sunday, the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities, the leading trade group of for-profit colleges, called the report “the result of a flawed process that has unfairly targeted private-sector schools and their students.”
For-profit higher education has long been a politically divisive issue, with Democrats generally arguing that greater regulation is needed to prevent huge publicly traded colleges from plundering the Treasury for student financial aid while leaving students with crippling debt and credentials that are worthless in the job market. Many Republicans see such colleges as a healthy free-market alternative to overcrowded community colleges, offering useful vocational training and education to working adults who will not attend more traditional institutions.
The Republicans on the Senate committee criticized the Democrats’ investigation for including testimony from Steve Eisman, the hedge fund manager who was one of the first to compare for-profit colleges to the subprime mortgage industry; for making public the internal company documents that the committee gathered; for refusing to broaden the investigation to include abuses by nonprofit colleges; and for being what they said was a hostile partisan effort.
Over the last 15 years, enrollment and profits have skyrocketed in the industry. Until the 1990s, the sector was made up of small independent schools offering training in fields like air-conditioning repair and cosmetology. But from 1998 to 2008, enrollment more than tripled, to about 2.4 million students. Three-quarters are at colleges owned by huge publicly traded companies — and, more recently, private equity firms — offering a wide variety of programs.
Enrolling students, and getting their federal financial aid, is the heart of the business, and in 2010, the report found, the colleges studied had a total of 32,496 recruiters, compared with 3,512 career-services staff members.
Among the 30 companies, an average of 22.4 percent of revenue went to marketing and recruiting, 19.4 percent to profits and 17.7 percent to instruction.
Their chief executive officers were paid an average of $7.3 million, although Robert S. Silberman, the chief executive of Strayer Education, made $41 million in 2009, including stock options.
With the Department of Education seeking new regulations to ensure that for-profit programs provide training for “gainful employment,” the companies examined spent $8 million on lobbying in 2010, and another $8 million in the first nine months of 2011.
The bulk of the for-profit colleges’ revenue, more than 80 percent in most cases, comes from taxpayers. The report found that many for-profit colleges are working desperately to find new strategies to comply with the federal regulation that at least 10 percent of revenue must come from sources other than the Department of Education. Because veterans’ benefits count toward that 10 percent even though they come from the federal government, aggressive recruiting of students from the military has become the norm.
The amount of available federal student aid is large and growing. The Apollo Group, which operates the University of Phoenix, the largest for-profit college, got $1.2 billion in Pell grants in 2010-11, up from $24 million a decade earlier. Apollo got $210 million more in benefits under the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill. And yet two-thirds of Apollo’s associate-degree students leave before earning their degree.
On Sunday, William Pepicello, president of the University of Phoenix, sent its 350,000 students a long e-mail warning of the criticism, and extolling the value of a Phoenix education.
On average, the Harkin report found, associate-degree and certificate programs at for-profit colleges cost about four times as much as those at community colleges and public universities.
And tuition decisions seem to be driven more by profit-seeking than instructional costs. An internal memo from the finance director of a Kaplan nursing program in Sacramento, for example, recommended an 8 percent increase in fees, saying that “with the new pricing, we can lose two students and still make the same profit.” Similarly, the chief financial officer at National American University wrote in an e-mail to executives that the university had not met its profit expectation for the summer quarter, so “as a result” it would need a midyear tuition increase.
Many of the for-profit colleges, the report found, set tuition at almost exactly what a student could expect in maximum federal aid, including Pell grants and Stafford loans. According to a Bridgepoint Education document, when a new $400 “digital materials fee” would make students pay more than would be available from federal aid, the chief executive frantically wrote an e-mail to the finance officer to complain that the change was going to cause a “shortfall.” And documents from Alta Colleges mention restructuring schedules “so we can grab more of the students’ Stafford.”
Furthermore, the report found, recruiters are often encouraged to avoid directly answering questions about costs and instead emphasize that with federal aid, student will pay little out of pocket. And costs are not easy for students to determine. A former Westwood College recruiter explained that prospective students were told that the cost was $4,800 per term, but not that there were five or six terms a year rather than the usual two or three.
At many schools, students learned only after the fact that their credits would not transfer to another college or university or qualify them for the professional licensing they sought.
Students at for-profit colleges make up 13 percent of the nation’s college enrollment, but account for about 47 percent of the defaults on loans. About 96 percent of students at for-profit schools take out loans, compared with about 13 percent at community colleges and 48 percent at four-year public universities.
Colleges with very high loan default rates in the two years after graduation (now changing to three years) lose their eligibility for federal student aid. As a result, the report found, many of the for-profit colleges try to move students having trouble with repayment into deferral or forbearance until they are past the years the government monitors.

strange and absurd

Russian anti-corruption campaigner Alexei Navalny has been charged with embezzlement in a case he describes as “strange and absurd”.Federal investigators in Moscow brought charges over a timber deal in the Kirov region in which he was involved as an un…

Russian anti-corruption campaigner Alexei Navalny has been charged with embezzlement in a case he describes as “strange and absurd“.

Federal investigators in Moscow brought charges over a timber deal in the Kirov region in which he was involved as an unofficial adviser three years ago.

The case was previously investigated and dropped by regional prosecutors.

Mr Navalny, who was also ordered not to leave the country, suggested the new charges were aimed at discrediting him.

Supporters of the anti-corruption lawyer, who led mass protests in Moscow against Russian leader Vladimir Putin this winter, demonstrated outside the offices of the Investigative Committee in Moscow, where he was charged on Tuesday.

Under Article 160 of the Russian criminal code on “misappropriation or embezzlement”, Mr Navalny faces between five and 10 years in prison if convicted.

wikileaks at Amazon

Under pressure from Sen. Joe Lieberman, Amazon.com kicked WikiLeaks.org off its servers. But why stop there? There’s all kinds of controversial customers the cowardly but remarkably convenient e-tailer can flee from. Take Hillary Clinton. Wikileaks rev…

Under pressure from Sen. Joe Lieberman, Amazon.com kicked WikiLeaks.org off its servers. But why stop there? There’s all kinds of controversial customers the cowardly but remarkably convenient e-tailer can flee from.


Take Hillary Clinton. Wikileaks revealed the Secretary of State to have “illegally” spied on the United Nations, but she remains welcome in Amazon’s books section.

Of course, Clinton didn’t disseminate thousands of secret diplomatic cables. Or actually, wait, she did, but through incompetence rather than intention. So maybe she doesn’t make Amazon cower quite like Wikileaks does.

What about the New York Times? The high-minded newspaper, whose editorial page considers itself a First Amendment champion, is a partner on Amazon.com’s Kindle; publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. even appeared on stage with Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos to introduce a new model of the e-reader.

And yet the newspaper went out of its way to get early access to the confidential diplomatic cables obtained by its sometime partner Wikileaks, and published much of the information they contained. The newspaper almost certainly violated the ridiculous Espionage Act in the process. Will Amazon evict the New York Times from the Kindle then? Or perhaps wipe the offending information remotely, George Orwell style, as Amazon has shown itself perfectly capable of doing?

Then there’s the Guardian, which also published Wikileaks data. The newspaper is listed as a customer of the same Amazon.com online services division that ejected Wikileaks. As is the Washington Post, which is also an Amazon partner delivering Kindle content, and which is no stranger to publishing controversial stories. In fact, it’s no stranger to the sort of State Department leaks Wikileaks is now trafficking. The Post, you’ll recall, revealed the existence of secret overseas CIA torture sites; a CIA analyst was later fired for purportedly leaking the data to the newspaper.

All of which is to say that Amazon’s unclear content standards will create a lot of confusion among its customers, clients and partners. As a private sector corporation, the company is of course free to pick and choose what it wants to sell and what bits it wants to serve. But the parties that do business with Amazon don’t want the uncertainty that comes from dealing with a weak-willed, unpredictable retailer. And avid readers with diverse tastes and a healthy appetite for controversy are unlikely to enjoy doing business with Amazon if they think the company is censorious. It’s bad enough that it’s in competition with adorable local booksellers.

Which is why it’s a big strike against the company that the criteria for getting kicked off Amazon is now totally unclear. Wikileaks, for example, is far from a clear cut case; the group is facing heat in Congress and from the State Department, as is Amazon, but no one has been convicted of any crimes in connection with this new data dump, or even formally charged.
Meanwhile, until the internet noticed and got upset, Amazon was content to sell “A Pedophile’s Guide.” Here’s how the company defended that title, before backing down and yanking the e-book:

Amazon believes it is censorship not to sell certain books simply because we or others believe their message is objectionable

Indeed it is. It’s also amazing how quickly those high-minded ideals have been discarded, not just for pedophilia books but for actual relevant information about government wrongdoing: Amazon issued the above quoted statement less than a month ago. Now it’s busy handling the holiday shopping crush. Don’t forget to take advantage of the Free Super Saver Shipping — or the McCarthyite repression, delivered faster than ever before.

Super Size Me

Super Size Me is a 2004 American documentary film directed by and starring Morgan Spurlock, an American independent filmmaker. Spurlock’s film follows a 30-day period from February 1 to March 2, 2003 during which he ate onl…

Super Size Me is a 2004 American documentary film directed by and starring Morgan Spurlock, an American independent filmmaker. Spurlock’s film follows a 30-day period from February 1 to March 2, 2003 during which he ate only McDonald’s food. The film documents this lifestyle’s drastic effect on Spurlock’s physical and psychological well-being, and explores the fast food industry’s corporate influence, including how it encourages poornutrition for its own profit.
Spurlock dined at McDonald’s restaurants three times per day, eating every item on the chain’s menu at least once. Spurlock consumed an average of 20.92 megajoules or 5,000 kcal (the equivalent of 9.26 Big Macs) per day during the experiment.
As a result, the then-32-year-old Spurlock gained 24½ lbs. (11.1 kg), a 13% body mass increase, a cholesterol level of 230, and experienced mood swingssexual dysfunction, and fat accumulation in his liver. It took Spurlock fourteen months to lose the weight gained from his experiment using avegan diet supervised by his future wife, a chef who specializes in gourmet vegan dishes.
The reason for Spurlock’s investigation was the increasing spread of obesity throughout U.S. society, which the Surgeon General has declared “epidemic,” and the corresponding lawsuit brought against McDonald’s on behalf of two overweight girls, who, it was alleged, became obese as a result of eating McDonald’s food [Pelman v. McDonald’s Corp., 237 F. Supp. 2d 512].[3] Spurlock points out that although the lawsuit against McDonald’s failed (and subsequently many state legislatures have legislated against product liability actions against producers and distributors of “fast food”), much of the same criticism leveled against the tobacco companies applies to fast food franchises whose product is both physiologically addictive and physically harmful.[4][5]
The documentary was nominated for an Academy Award for Documentary Feature.[6]
A comic book related to the movie has been made with Dark Horse as the publisher. It contains stories about various cases of fast food health scares

virtual rudeness

Why Is Everyone on the Internet So Angry?

A perfect storm engenders online rudeness,
including virtual anonymity and thus a lack of accountability, physical
distance and the medium of writing
By Natalie Wolchover and Life’s Little Mysteries

Why Is Everyone on the Internet So Angry?

A perfect storm engenders online rudeness,
including virtual anonymity and thus a lack of accountability, physical
distance and the medium of writing
By Natalie Wolchover and Life’s Little Mysteries

 |

July 25, 2012 

With a presidential campaign, health care and the gun control debate in
the news these days, one can’t help

cousins

Bonobo Genome Found Strikingly Similar To Humans And Chimps (via redOrbit) Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com The bonobo, one of man’s closest relatives, has had its genome completely mapped by German researchers, placing a new checkmark in the DNA-sequencing list that … Continue reading


Bonobo Genome Found Strikingly Similar To Humans And Chimps (via redOrbit)

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com The bonobo, one of man’s closest relatives, has had its genome completely mapped by German researchers, placing a new checkmark in the DNA-sequencing list that already includes humans, chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans, giving scientists a complete record of the…



Neanderthals Had Knowledge Of Plant Healing Qualities

Neanderthals Had Knowledge Of Plant Healing Qualities (via redOrbit) redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online A team of researchers has provided the first molecular evidence that Neanderthals not only ate a range of cooked plant foods, but … Continue reading


Neanderthals Had Knowledge Of Plant Healing Qualities (via redOrbit)

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online A team of researchers has provided the first molecular evidence that Neanderthals not only ate a range of cooked plant foods, but also understood their nutritional and medicinal qualities. Neanderthals, who disappeared between 30,000 and 24,000…



overuse of antibiotics in meat production

Clicking here will automatically add your name to this petition to Trader Joe’s :”Trader Joe’s, I urge you to source and sell only meat and poultry raised without antibiotics.”Automatically add your name:Learn more about this campaignTrader Joe’s has t…


Tell Trader Joe's: Stop selling meat raised with antibiotics!
Clicking here will automatically add your name to this petition to Trader Joe’s :
“Trader Joe’s, I urge you to source and sell only meat and poultry raised without antibiotics.”
Automatically add your name:
Take action now!

CREDO Action | more than a network, a movement.

Dear Friend,
Earlier this month, medical researchers at the University of Montreal linked a difficult-to-treat bladder infection that affects millions of women a year with a form of antibiotic-resistant E. coli commonly found in chicken.1
This is just one of a growing number of stories about the rise of antibiotic resistant superbugs making humans sick, which researchers are increasingly connecting with the rampant overuse of antibiotics in meat production.
This is an emergency situation. But federal regulators appear incapable of overcoming pressure from the Big Meat and pharmaceutical lobbies.
It’s time for major retailers like Trader Joe’s to step up and help get antibiotics out of our food.
CREDO is joining with Consumers Union2 and other groups to call on Trader Joe’s to sell only antibiotic-free meat because the company has shown a commitment to safe food in the past — including sourcing only non-GMO ingredients, and meat free of pink slime.
And because the company sells most of its products under its own label, Trader Joe’s has direct control of its supply chain.
The company already sells some meat that does not contain antibiotics, but going all the way would create a powerful incentive for other retailers to follow suit, by meeting the strong consumer demand for meat raised without antibiotics.3
Antibiotics are a crucial tool to cure illness for all of us. And whether or not you eat meat, we’re all endangered by the antibiotic-resistant bacteria that continue emerging as a result of antibiotic overuse on factory farms.
80% of all antibiotics are currently fed to livestock — primarily as a growth stimulant and to compensate for filthy, cruel living conditions. That needs to stop.
More than 100,000 CREDO members submitted a public comment to the FDA earlier this month urging the agency to strengthen its voluntary and inadequate antibiotics standards.
While we wait for FDA’s response, Trader Joe’s can show its commitment to food safety, and start moving meat producers away from their dangerous use of antibiotics.
Click below to automatically sign the petition to Trader Joe’s now:
http://act.credoaction.com/r/?r=6919616&p=tjs_meat&id=44141-5154581-Aks%3Dt7x&t=10
Thank you for fighting for save and healthy food.
Elijah Zarlin, Campaign Manager 
CREDO Action from Working Assets