The grave-digger

Once, as I was burying one of my dead selves, the grave-digger came by and said to me, “Of all those who come here to bury, you alone I like.” Said I, “You please me exceedingly, but why do you … Continue reading

Once, as I was burying one of my dead selves, the grave-digger came by and said to me, “Of all those who come here to bury, you alone I like.”

Said I, “You please me exceedingly, but why do you like me?”

“Because,” said he, “They come weeping and go weeping—you only come laughing and go laughing.”

Khalil Gibran

Chicomóztoc

Chicomóztoc es el nombre del mítico lugar de origen de los aztecas mexicas, Tepanecas, Acolhuas, y otros pueblos de lengua náhuatl (o nahuas) de la región central de Mexico de Mesoamérica, en el periodo Postclásico.
Hay una asociación de Chicomo…

Chicomóztoc es el nombre del mítico lugar de origen de los aztecas mexicas, Tepanecas, Acolhuas, y otros pueblos de lengua náhuatl (o nahuas) de la región central de Mexico de Mesoamérica, en el periodo Postclásico.
Hay una asociación de Chicomoztoc con ciertas tradiciones relativas legendario Culhuacán (Colhuacan), un verdadero asentamiento prehispánico en el Valle de México, que se consideró


Asherah

Asherah (; Ugaritic: ???????????????? : ‘?rt; Hebrew: ?????????), in Semitic mythology, is a Semitic mother goddess, who appears in a number of ancient sources including Akkadian writings by the name of Ashratum/Ashratu and in Hittite as Asherdu(s) or Ashertu(s) or Aserdu(s) … Continue reading

Asherah (; Ugaritic: ???????????????? : ‘?rt; Hebrew: ?????????), in Semitic mythology, is a Semitic mother goddess, who appears in a number of ancient sources including Akkadian writings by the name of Ashratum/Ashratu and in Hittite as Asherdu(s) or Ashertu(s) or Aserdu(s) or Asertu(s). Asherah is generally considered identical with the Ugaritic goddess Athirat (more accurately transcribed as ?A?irat).

She is identified as the wife or consort of the Sumerian Anu or Ugaritic El, the oldest deities of their pantheons.[1] This role gave her a similarly high rank in the Ugaritic pantheon.[2] The name Allat (Elat, Ilat) in the Sanchuniathon is clearly associated with Asherah, because the same common epithet of “the goddess par excellence,” is used to describe her.[3] The Book of Jeremiah written circa 628 BC possibly refers to Asherah when it uses the title “queen of heaven” (Hebrew: ????????? ????????????) in Jer 7:18 and Jer 44:17–19, 25.[4] (For a discussion of “queen of heaven” in the Hebrew Bible, see Queen of heaven.)

FUSILLI CON TOMATE

Más en http://elcocinerofiel.com/
Ingredientes:
300 g de fusilli,
50 g de alcaparras en sal,
50 g de aceituna negra,
4 tomates maduros,
2 cebollas,
aceite de oliva virgen extra,
y sal.

Más en http://elcocinerofiel.com/
Ingredientes:
300 g de fusilli,
50 g de alcaparras en sal,
50 g de aceituna negra,
4 tomates maduros,
2 cebollas,
aceite de oliva virgen extra,
y sal.


biblical propaganda

A diaspora (from Greek ????????, “scattering, dispersion”)[1] is “the movement, migration, or scattering of people away from an established or ancestral homeland”[2] or “people dispersed by whatever cause to more than one location”,[3] or “people settled far from their ancestral … Continue reading

A diaspora (from Greek ????????, “scattering, dispersion”)[1] is “the movement, migration, or scattering of people away from an established or ancestral homeland”[2] or “people dispersed by whatever cause to more than one location”,[3] or “people settled far from their ancestral homelands”.[2]

The word has come to refer to historical mass-dispersions of people with common roots, particularly movements of an involuntary nature, such as the expulsion of Jews from the Middle East, the African Trans-Atlantic slave trade, the southern Chinese during the coolie slave trade, or the century-long exile of the Messenians under Spartan rule.[3]

Recently, scholarship has distinguished between different kinds of diaspora, based on its causes such as imperialism, trade or labor migrations, or by the kind of social coherence within the diaspora community and its ties to the ancestral lands. Some diaspora communities maintain strong political ties with their homeland. Other qualities that may be typical of many diasporas are thoughts of return, relationships with other communities in the diaspora, and lack of full assimilation into the host country.[3]





Misquoting Jesus

Bart D. Ehrman is an American New Testament scholar, currently the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ‘Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why’ is … Continue reading

Bart D. Ehrman is an American New Testament scholar, currently the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

‘Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why’ is a book by Bart D. Ehrman, a New Testament scholar at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The book introduces lay readers to the field of textual criticism of the Bible. Ehrman discusses a number of textual variants that resulted from intentional or accidental manuscript changes during the scriptorium era.